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There are times when exporting to a pdf image is simply troublesome. If the data you are plotting contains many points then your figure will be big in size and the pdf viewer of your choice will spend most of its time rendering this high quality image. We can thus export this image as a jpeg, png or tiff. The picture will be fine from a certain view but when you zoom in it will look all distorted. This is fine to some extent for the figure we are plotting but if your image contains text then this text will look pixelated.

In order to try to get the best of both worlds we can separate this figure into two parts: Axes with labels and the 3D picture. The axes can thus be exported as pdf or eps and the 3D figure as a raster. I wish I knew how later combine the two in Mathematica, so for the moment we can use a vector graphics editor such as Inkscape or Illustrator to combine the two.

I managed to achieve this for a plot I made in a publication but this prompt me to create routines in Mathematica in order to automatize this process. Here is what I have so far:

SetDirectory[NotebookDirectory[]];
SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"];

I like to start my notebook by setting the working directory to the notebook directory. Since I want my images to be of the size I specify I set the printing style environment to working, check this for more info.

in = 72;
G3D = Graphics3D[
  AlignmentPoint -> Center,
  AspectRatio -> 0.925,
  Axes -> {True, True, True},
  AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}},
  AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black],
  BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12},
  Boxed -> False,
  BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1},
  LabelStyle -> Directive[Black],
  ImagePadding -> All,
  ImageSize -> 5 in,
  PlotRange -> All,
  PlotRangePadding -> None,
  TicksStyle -> Directive[10],
  ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2},
  ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}
 ]

Here we set the view of the plot we want to make. Now lets create our plot.

g = Show[
  Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, 
   Mesh -> None,
   AxesLabel -> {"x", "y", "z"}
   ], 
  Options[G3D]
 ]

enter image description here

Now we need to find a way of separating. Lets start by drawing the axes.

axes = Graphics3D[{}, AbsoluteOptions[g]]

enter image description here

fig = Show[g, 
  AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]],
  FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}
 ]

enter image description here

I included the facegrids so that we can match the figure with the axis in the post editing process. Now we export both images.

Export["Axes.pdf", axes];
Export["Fig.pdf", Rasterize[fig, ImageResolution -> 300]];

You will obtain two pdf files which you can edit in and put together into a pdf or eps. I wish it was that simple but it isn't. If you actually did this you will obtain this:

enter image description here

The two figures are different sizes. I know axes.pdf is correct because when I open it in Inkspace the figure size is 5 inches as I had previously specified.

I mentioned before that I managed to get this with one of my plots. I will clean the file and change the plots to make it more accessible for anyone who wants to see that this is in fact true. In any case, does anyone know why I can't get the two pdf files to be the same size? Also, keep in mind that we want to obtain a pretty plot for the Rasterized figure. Thank you for your time.

PS. As a bonus, can we avoid the post editing and simply combine the two figures in mathematica? The rasterized version and the vector graphics version that is.


EDIT:

Thanks to rcollyer for his comment. I'm posting the results of his comment.

One thing to mention is that when we export the axes we need to set Background to None so that we can have a transparent picture.

Export["Axes.pdf", axes, Background -> None];
Export["Fig.pdf", Rasterize[fig, ImageResolution -> 300]];
a = Import["Axes.pdf"];
b = Import["Fig.pdf"];
Show[b, a]

enter image description here

And then, exporting the figure gives the desired effect

Export["FinalFig.pdf", Show[b, a]]

enter image description here

The axes preserve the nice components of vector graphics while the figure is now a Rasterized version of the what we plotted. But the main question still remains. How do you make the two figures match?

UPDATE:

My question has been answered by Alexey Popkov. I would like to thank him for taking the time to look into my problem. The following code is an example for those of you want to use the technique I previously mentioned. Please see Alexey Popkov's answer for useful comments in his code. He managed to make it work in Mathematica 7 and it works even better in Mathematica 8. Here is the result:

SetDirectory[NotebookDirectory[]];
SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"];
$HistoryLength = 0;
in = 72;
G3D = Graphics3D[
 AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, Axes -> {True, True, True},
 AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black],
 BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, Boxed -> False, 
 BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImagePadding -> 40,
 ImageSize -> 5 in, PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> 0,
 TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}
];
axesLabels = Graphics3D[{
 Text[Style["x axis (units)", Black, 12], Scaled[{.5, -.1, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, -.9}],
 Text[Style["y axis (units)", Black, 12], Scaled[{1.1, .5, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, .9}],
 Text[Style["z axis (units)", Black, 12], Scaled[{0, -.15, .7}], {0, 0}, {-.1, 1.5}]
}];
fig = Show[
  Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, Mesh -> None],
  ImagePadding -> {{40, 0}, {15, 0}}, Options[G3D]
];
axes = Show[
  Graphics3D[{}, FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, 
    AbsoluteOptions[fig]], axesLabels, 
    Epilog -> Text[Style["Panel A", Bold, Black, 12], ImageScaled[{0.075, 0.975}]]
];
fig = Show[fig, AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]]];
Row[{fig, axes}]

At this point you should see this:

enter image description here

The magnification takes care of the resolution of your image. You should try different values to see how this changes your picture.

fig = Magnify[fig, 5];
fig = Rasterize[fig, Background -> None];

Combine the graphics

axes = First@ImportString[ExportString[axes, "PDF"], "PDF"];
result = Show[axes, Epilog -> Inset[fig, {0, 0}, {0, 0}, ImageDimensions[axes]]];

Export them

Export["Result.pdf", result];
Export["Result.eps", result];

The only difference I found between M7 and M8 using the above code is that M7 does not export the eps file correctly. Other than that everything is working fine now. :)

enter image description here

The first column shows the output obtained from M7. Top is the eps version with file size of 614 kb, bottom is the pdf version with file size of 455 kb. The second column shows the output obtained from M8. Top is the eps version with file size of 643 kb, bottom is the pdf version with file size of 463 kb.

I hope you find this useful. Please check Alexey's answer to see the comments in his code, they will help you avoid pitfalls with Mathematica.

share|improve this question
1  
have you tried Importing them both and using Show? –  rcollyer Jun 10 '11 at 4:17
    
@rcollyer Genious! I didn't think about that possibility. This solves the bonus question. No need to use Inkscape anymore to do this. But the main question still remains. How do you get them both to match up? See my edit in the post. –  jmlopez Jun 10 '11 at 4:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The complete solution for Mathematica 7.0.1: fixing bugs

The code with comments:

(*controls the resolution of rasterized graphics*)
magnification = 5;

SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"]
(*Turn off history for saving memory*)
$HistoryLength = 0;
(*Epilog will give us the bounding box of the graphics*)
g1 = Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, 
   AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, 
   Axes -> {True, True, True}, 
   AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, 
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, 
   Boxed -> False, BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, 
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImagePadding -> All, 
   ImageSize -> 5*72, PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> None, 
   TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, 
   ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}, AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]], 
   FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, Mesh -> None, 
   ImagePadding -> 40, 
   Epilog -> {Red, AbsoluteThickness[1], 
     Line[{ImageScaled[{0, 0}], ImageScaled[{0, 1}], 
       ImageScaled[{1, 1}], ImageScaled[{1, 0}], 
       ImageScaled[{0, 0}]}]}];
(*The options list should NOT contain ImagePadding->Full.Even it is \
before ImagePadding->40 it is not replaced by the latter-another bug!*)
axes = Graphics3D[{Opacity[0], 
    Point[PlotRange /. AbsoluteOptions[g1] // Transpose]}, 
   AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, 
   Axes -> {True, True, True}, 
   AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, 
   AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black], 
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, 
   Boxed -> False, BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, 
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImageSize -> 5*72, 
   PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> None, 
   TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, 
   ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}, ImagePadding -> 40, 
   Epilog -> {Red, AbsoluteThickness[1], 
     Line[{ImageScaled[{0, 0}], ImageScaled[{0, 1}], 
       ImageScaled[{1, 1}], ImageScaled[{1, 0}], 
       ImageScaled[{0, 0}]}]}];
(*fixing bug with ImagePadding loosed when specifyed as option in \
Plot3D*)
g1 = AppendTo[g1, ImagePadding -> 40];
(*Increasing ImageSize without damage.Explicit setting for \
ImagePadding is important (due to a bug in behavior of \
ImagePadding->Full)!*)
g1 = Magnify[g1, magnification];
g2 = Rasterize[g1, Background -> None];
(*Fixing bug with non-working option Background->None when graphics \
is Magnifyed*)
g2 = g2 /. {255, 255, 255, 255} -> {0, 0, 0, 0};
(*Fixing bug with icorrect exporting of Ticks in PDF when Graphics3D \
and 2D Raster are combined*)
axes = First@ImportString[ExportString[axes, "PDF"], "PDF"];
(*Getting explicid ImageSize of graphics imported form PDF*)
imageSize = 
 Last@Transpose[{First@#, Last@#} & /@ 
    Sort /@ Transpose@
      First@Cases[axes, 
        Style[{Line[x_]}, ___, RGBColor[1.`, 0.`, 0.`, 1.`], ___] :> 
         x, Infinity]]
(*combining Graphics3D and Graphics*)
result = Show[axes, Epilog -> Inset[g2, {0, 0}, {0, 0}, imageSize]]
Export["C:\\result.pdf", result]

Here is what I see in the Notebook:

screenshot

And here is what I get in the PDF:

screenshot

share|improve this answer
    
In Win7/M8.01 I don't see the axes and tick labels when running the above code. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 10 '11 at 14:31
    
@Sjoerd @belisarius I think we can conclude that some graphics functionality is broken in v.8... ;) –  Alexey Popkov Jun 10 '11 at 15:32
    
@Alexey, thank you for trying a different approach. I'll be checking on this once I install M8. –  jmlopez Jun 10 '11 at 18:17
    
@Alexey, I think the problem is that M8 does not export png or rasterized images with transparent background. For this reason, when you attempt to place g2 on top then you see no axes and tick labels (background of rasterized image is white). –  jmlopez Jun 10 '11 at 23:46
    
@jmlopez Please see edited version of the answer. It seems that I got it (at least for Mathematica 7.0.1)! –  Alexey Popkov Jun 11 '11 at 3:33

Just checking (Mma8):

SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"];
in = 72;
G3D = Graphics3D[AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, 
   Axes -> {True, True, True}, 
   AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, 
   AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black], 
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, 
   Boxed -> False, BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, 
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImagePadding -> All, 
   ImageSize -> 5 in, PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> None, 
   TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, 
   ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}];
g = Show[Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, Mesh -> None, 
    AxesLabel -> {"x", "y", "z"}], Options[G3D]];
axes = Graphics3D[{}, AbsoluteOptions[g]];
fig = Show[g, AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]], 
   FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}];
Export["c:\\Axes.pdf", axes, Background -> None];
Export["c:\\Fig.pdf", Rasterize[fig, ImageResolution -> 300]];
a = Import["c:\\Axes.pdf"];
b = Import["c:\\Fig.pdf"];
Export["c:\\FinalFig.pdf", Show[b, a]]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
With Mathematica 7.0.1 with this code I get the same image as showed in the question. –  Alexey Popkov Jun 10 '11 at 14:29
    
@Alexey I think we can conclude that the Export to PDF feature was fixed in v8 ... –  belisarius Jun 10 '11 at 14:38
    
Works for me. Win7/M8.01 –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 10 '11 at 14:52
    
So... all this time I've had problems because of Mathematica 7? Dear lord! I've also been having lots of problem using Graphics. Maybe switching to M8 will solve the problems. Anyway, thank you for checking. Now I'm wondering, which answer should I accept? Mathematica is simply broken. –  jmlopez Jun 10 '11 at 17:05
    
@jmlopez You should accept the answer that you found to be the most helpful to you as per meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… :) –  belisarius Jun 10 '11 at 17:09

In Mathematica 8 the problem may be solved even simpler using new Overlay function.

Here is the code from the UPDATE section of the question:

SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"];
$HistoryLength = 0;
in = 72;
G3D = Graphics3D[AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, 
   Axes -> {True, True, True}, 
   AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, 
   AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black], 
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, 
   Boxed -> False, BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, 
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImagePadding -> 40, 
   ImageSize -> 5 in, PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> 0, 
   TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, 
   ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}];
axesLabels = 
  Graphics3D[{Text[Style["x axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{.5, -.1, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, -.9}], 
    Text[Style["y axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{1.1, .5, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, .9}], 
    Text[Style["z axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{0, -.15, .7}], {0, 0}, {-.1, 1.5}]}];
fig = Show[Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, Mesh -> None], 
   ImagePadding -> {{40, 0}, {15, 0}}, Options[G3D]];
axes = Show[
   Graphics3D[{}, FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, 
    AbsoluteOptions[fig]], axesLabels, 
   Epilog -> 
    Text[Style["Panel A", Bold, Black, 12], 
     ImageScaled[{0.075, 0.975}]]];
fig = Show[fig, AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]]];

And here is the solution:

gr = Overlay[{axes, 
   Rasterize[fig, Background -> None, ImageResolution -> 300]}]
Export["Result.pdf", gr]

In this case we need not to convert fonts to outlines.

UPDATE

As jmlopez pointed out in the comments to this answer, the option Background -> None does not work properly under Mac OS X in Mathematica 8.0.1. One workaround is to replace white non-transparent points by transparent:

gr = Overlay[{axes, 
   Rasterize[fig, Background -> None, 
     ImageResolution -> 300] /. {255, 255, 255, 255} -> {0, 0, 0, 0}}]
Export["Result.pdf", gr]
share|improve this answer
    
Something is not working when I try it. I only get fig with a white background. Is as if Rasterized ignored the background option. –  jmlopez Oct 10 '11 at 17:01
    
@jmlopez Are you using Mathematica 8.0.1? I use Windows version. The output looks good both inside of the Notebook and in PDF viewer. But exporting to EPS in this case works not so well. –  Alexey Popkov Oct 10 '11 at 18:19
    
I'm using MMA 8.0.1 in Mac OS X. I think there is a problem with Graphics3D or Rasterize. Take for instance: Overlay[{fig, Plot[x, {x, 1, 2}]}] with fig as defined in your post. Then overlay works. But if you try: Overlay[{fig, Graphics3D[]}] then it doesn't show fig. It might be a bug on the mac version. –  jmlopez Oct 10 '11 at 18:27
    
@jmlopez Try Overlay[{fig, Rasterize[Graphics3D[], Background -> None]}]. This works on my system. With the original code from my answer you could try also Rasterize[fig,Background->None,ImageResolution->300]/.{Repeated[255,{4}]}->{0,0‌​,0,0}. –  Alexey Popkov Oct 10 '11 at 18:40
    
That works. Unfortunately that seems to take longer to compute than in the previous method. Well, hopefully by the next release it will be fixed on the mac. –  jmlopez Oct 10 '11 at 19:57

Here I present another version of the original solution which uses the second argument of Raster instead of Inset. I think that this way is a little more straightforward.

Here is the code from the UPDATE section of the question (modified a bit):

SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Working"];
$HistoryLength = 0;
in = 72;
G3D = Graphics3D[AlignmentPoint -> Center, AspectRatio -> 0.925, 
   Axes -> {True, True, True}, 
   AxesEdge -> {{-1, -1}, {1, -1}, {-1, -1}}, 
   AxesStyle -> Directive[10, Black], 
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontSize -> 12}, 
   Boxed -> False, BoxRatios -> {3, 3, 1}, 
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black], ImagePadding -> 40, 
   ImageSize -> 5 in, PlotRange -> All, PlotRangePadding -> 0, 
   TicksStyle -> Directive[10], ViewPoint -> {2, -2, 2}, 
   ViewVertical -> {0, 0, 1}];
axesLabels = 
  Graphics3D[{Text[Style["x axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{.5, -.1, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, -.9}], 
    Text[Style["y axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{1.1, .5, 0}], {0, 0}, {1, .9}], 
    Text[Style["z axis (units)", Black, 12], 
     Scaled[{0, -.15, .7}], {0, 0}, {-.1, 1.5}]}];
fig = Show[Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}, Mesh -> None], 
   ImagePadding -> {{40, 0}, {15, 0}}, Options[G3D]];
axes = Show[
   Graphics3D[{}, FaceGrids -> {{-1, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, 
    AbsoluteOptions[fig]], axesLabels, 
   Prolog -> 
    Text[Style["Panel A", Bold, Black, 12], 
     ImageScaled[{0.075, 0.975}]]];
fig = Show[fig, AxesStyle -> Directive[Opacity[0]]];
fig = Magnify[fig, 5];
fig = Rasterize[fig, Background -> None];
axes2D = First@ImportString[ExportString[axes, "PDF"], "PDF"];

The rest of the answer is the new solution.

At first, we set the second argument of Raster so that it will fill the complete PlotRange of axes2D. The general way to do this is:

fig = fig /. 
   Raster[data_, rectangle_, opts___] :> 
    Raster[data, {Scaled[{0, 0}], Scaled[{1, 1}]}, opts];

Another way is to make direct assignment to the corresponding Part of the original expression:

fig[[1, 2]] = {Scaled[{0, 0}], Scaled[{1, 1}]}

Note that this last code is based on the knowledge of internal structure of the expression generated by Rasterize which is potentially version-dependent.

Now we combine two graphical objects in a very straightforward way:

result = Show[axes2D, fig]

And export the result:

Export["C:/Result.pdf", result];
Export["C:/Result.eps", result];

Both .eps and .pdf are exported perfectly with Mathematica 8.0.4 under Windows XP 32 bit and look identical to the files exported with the original code:

result = Show[axes2D, 
  Epilog -> Inset[fig, Center, Center, ImageScaled[{1, 1}]]]
Export["C:/Result.pdf", result];
Export["C:/Result.eps", result];

Note that we need not necessarily to convert axes to outlines at least when exporting to PDF. The code

result = Show[axes, 
  Epilog -> Inset[fig, Center, Center, ImageScaled[{1, 1}]]]
Export["C:/Result.pdf", result];

and the code

fig[[1, 2]] = {ImageScaled[{0, 0}], ImageScaled[{1, 1}]};
result = Show[axes, Epilog -> First@fig]
Export["C:/Result.pdf", result];

produce PDF files looking identical to both previous versions.

share|improve this answer

This looks like much ado about nothing. As I read it, the problem you want to solve is the following:

  • You want to export in a vector format, so that when printed the optimal resolution is used for fonts, lines and graphics
  • In your edit program you don't want be bothered by the slowness of rendering a complex vector drawing

These requirements can be met by exporting as .eps and using an embedded rasterized preview image.

Export["file.eps","PreviewFormat"->"TIFF"]

This will work in many applications. Unfortunately, MS Word's eps filter has been changing wildly over the last four versions or so, and whereas it once worked for me in one of the older functions it doesn't anymore in W2010. I've heard rumors that it might work in the mac version, but I can't check right now.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that the idea of the question is really interesting from the practical point of view. I thought of this earlier but I found it too difficult or impossible. We have too many problems with PDF export of Graphics3D (and even Graphics!) in Mathematica. Any workarounds are interesting and possibly helpful for others. –  Alexey Popkov Jun 10 '11 at 15:42
    
@jmlopez I added the requested line of code for those unable or unwilling to find it in the doc center. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 11 '11 at 14:33
    
Unless I'm not using it correctly all I obtain is a file with size bigger than without using that option. Try this in M7.0.1 Export["FIG.eps", Graphics3D[Sphere[{0, 0, 0}, 1], Axes -> True], Background -> None, "PreviewFormat" -> "TIFF"] with and without the option. The idea like you said: "optimal resolution is used for fonts, lines and graphics". More specifically, fonts and simple lines in vector graphics, complex figures such as surfaces in rasterized versions. This should reduce file size and give you some good looking plots. –  jmlopez Jun 11 '11 at 14:57
    
@jmlopez A bigger file size is to be expected. An eps with embedded preview contains both the vector description and a preview of how these should look like when rendered. The idea is that your text editor should show the preview as a quick placeholder and should send the postscript stuff to the printer. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 12 '11 at 9:29

Mathematica 9.0.1.0 / 64-bit Linux: In general, it seems to be very tricky to place the vectorized axes at the correct position. In most applications it will be sufficient to simply rasterize everything with a high resolution:

fig = Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, 3}, {y, 0, 3}, Mesh -> None];

Export["export.eps", fig, "AllowRasterization" -> True, 
  ImageResolution -> 600];

The code exports the graphic to an EPS-file using a high quality rasterization of both the 3D content and the axis. Finally, you can convert the EPS-file to a PDF using for example the Linux command epspdf:

epspdf export.eps

This is probably sufficient for most of the users and it saves you a lot of time. However, if you really want to export the text as vector graphic, you might want to try the following function:

ExportAsSemiRaster[filename_, dpi_, fig_, plotrange_, 
   plotrangepadding_] := (
   range = 
    Show[fig, PlotRange -> plotrange, 
     PlotRangePadding -> plotrangepadding];
   axes = Show[Graphics3D[{}, AbsoluteOptions[range]]];
   noaxes = Show[range, AxesStyle -> Transparent];
   raster = 
    Rasterize[noaxes, Background -> None, ImageResolution -> dpi];
   result = 
    Show[raster, 
     Epilog -> Inset[axes, Center, Center, ImageDimensions[raster]]];
   Export[filename, result];
   );

You need to explicitly specify the PlotRange and the PlotRangePadding. Example:

fig = Graphics3D[{Opacity[0.9], Orange, 
    Polygon[{{0, 0, 0}, {4, 0, 4}, {4, 5, 7}, {0, 5, 5}}], 
    Opacity[0.05], Gray, CuboidBox[{0, 0, 0}, {4, 5, 7}]}, 
   Axes -> True, AxesStyle -> Darker[Orange], 
   AxesLabel -> {"x1", "x2", "x3"}, Boxed -> False, 
   ViewPoint -> {-8.5, -8, 6}];
ExportAsSemiRaster["export.pdf", 600, 
  fig, {{0, 4}, {0, 5}, {0, 7}}, {.0, .0, .0}];
Print[Import["export.pdf"]];
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot check in MMa 9.01 right now but in MMa 8.0.4 your ExportAsSemiRaster function gives incorrect positioning of the axes. Also possibly you can find this useful (have not checked myself). –  Alexey Popkov Jul 5 '14 at 17:54
    
Strongly related: mathematica.stackexchange.com/a/1550/280 –  Alexey Popkov Jul 5 '14 at 17:57

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