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I have a small question. I have a file in the following format:

1 2 
1 2 3
1 2
1 2 3 4
2 4

The values in the code actually represent numbers(not necessarily single digit), but they can be any number, can be floating point values too.

Input file: For a particular row, each number is separated from another by a single whitespace (the separator can't be anything other than whitespace).

My task: I want to zero fill the empty spaces in such a way that it looks like this, i.e. fill up the empty spaces in such a way that it gives me a nice matrix-looking format:

1 2 0 0
1 2 3 0
1 2 0 0
1 2 3 4
2 4 0 0

Output file: Same rule applies. For a particular row, each number is separated from another by a single whitespace only.

Language used: Python(or may be Shell, if that's possible)

I know there is this function called zfill, but I don't think that would be much of a help to me.

My solution: Find the (maximum length/2) of each line, using len and max functions. Then, using split(), fill up with zeros at appropriate places of each line. I am afraid it might turn into a dirty code and I'm sure there are better ways to accomplish this task.

Any suggestion is welcome.

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
are all the numbers in the files single digit? –  gnibbler Jun 10 '11 at 5:43
    
Is this homework? –  GWW Jun 10 '11 at 5:43
3  
You need to be more specific. Do the 1, 2, 3, 4 values actually represent numbers (i.e. they can be anything), or are they some kind of symbol, being conceptually treated as a character (i.e. it will only ever be one digit each)? Could the whitespace in the input separating them be something other than spaces? Does it matter how they are spaced in the output file? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 10 '11 at 5:44
    
@GWW, no this not homework –  vandy_jug Jun 10 '11 at 6:00
    
@Karl Knechtel: I have tried to address your questions by updating my original question. Please let me know if you need any more details. –  vandy_jug Jun 10 '11 at 6:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assume myfile is the open file. We use izip_longest from itertools to iterate over the columns of the input file, filling in "0" for missing values:

[('1', '1', '1', '1', '2'),  ('2', '2', '2', '2', '4'),      
 ('0', '3', '0', '3', '0'), ('0', '0', '0', '4', '0')]

Then we simply zip this output again to restore the rows with zeroes filled in. This is the code:

from itertools import izip_longest

rows = [line.split() for line in myfile]            # Read
rows = zip(*izip_longest(*rows, fillvalue="0"))     # Add zeroes
print "\n".join(" ".join(row) for row in rows)      # Write

EDIT: The above (imho elegant) solution is slightly slower (8.55 usec vs. 7.08 usec) than the naive approach:

rows = [line.split() for line in myfile]
maxlen = max(len(x) for x in rows)
for row in rows:
    print " ".join(row + ["0"] * (maxlen - len(row)))

Re: comment

If you want to align the columns it's easiest to amend the first approach, because there we already have the numbers arranged by column at one point. That makes finding the column width easy.

from itertools import izip_longest

rows = [line.split() for line in myfile]
columns = list(izip_longest(*rows, fillvalue="0"))
column_width = [max(len(num) for num in col) for col in columns]

# We make a template of the form "{0:>a} {1:>b} {2:>c} ...",
# where a, b, c, ... are the column widths:
column_template = "{{{0}:>{1}s}}"
row_template = " ".join(column_template.format(i, n) for
    i, n in enumerate(column_width))

print "\n".join(row_template.format(*row) for row in zip(*columns))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. If I am not wrong, your solution seems fine as long as the columns are single digit numbers. But as I have mentioned, they needn't be. If the input file has a double/multi digit number in any of its columns, the output that your code provides is kind of messy i.e. they aren't (or rather don't start/end) in the same column. Think it this way: the output, hence generated is taken as a matrix for further matrix operations. For me, its not a problem as genfromtxt seems to take care of that(atleast as of now). So, I am raising it just for discussion purposes –  vandy_jug Jun 11 '11 at 1:20
    
Let me quote to you from your question: "Output file: Same rule applies. For a particular row, each number is separated from another by a single whitespace only". Have you changed your mind? –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 11 '11 at 10:11
    
Yeah, my bad. After looking at the output of multi-digit columns, I had to change my mind. –  vandy_jug Jun 13 '11 at 17:00

You could always read each lines and count the number of numbers that you have. Then you can write this line into a new temporary file and append the fillings after and you can overwrite the original file with this temporary file if required.

To count the number of numbers you can use str.split() with your white-space character as separator then you just get the number of entries in the list. Appending your filling number should be quite straight forward.

More documentation on str.split()

share|improve this answer

Something like this - but i also believe that it should be updated since not all is clear in your question:

tst="""
       1 2
       1 2 3
       1 2
       1 2 3 4
       2 4
    """
res = [line for line in tst.split('\n') if line != '']
mLen = max(len(line) for line in res)   
print '\n'.join(list((line + ' 0' * ((mLen - len(line))//2) for line in res)))
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to use list in the last line: '\n'.join(line + ' 0' * ((mLen - len(line))//2) for line in res) –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 10 '11 at 10:16
    
@lazyr Sure, my fault - just forgot to remove it before publish(was playing with iterators). –  Artsiom Rudzenka Jun 10 '11 at 10:18
    
Thanks. If I am not wrong, your solution seems fine as long as the columns are single digit numbers. But as I have mentioned, they needn't be. If the input file has a double/multi digit number in any of its columns, the output that your code provides is kind of messy i.e. they aren't (or rather don't start/end) in the same column. Think it this way: the output, hence generated is taken as a matrix for further matrix operations. For me, its not a problem as genfromtxt seems to take care of that(atleast as of now). So, I am raising it just for discussion purposes –  vandy_jug Jun 11 '11 at 1:21

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