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I have an object that I am trying to update using MVC(2), also using EntityFramework framework.

I know I haven't provided much code but don't really feel it necessary. The reason I have logic like this, i'll explain:

  • I have some cascading drop downs, and when one of the drop downs is empty I use jQuery to fill it with an "UNKNOWN" value e.g. with id like -1.
  • So when I get value -1, I create the UNKNOWN value which is in another table.
  • Then I find that object and assign it to Fruit

Code like this:

if (id == -1)
            {
                //The object was unknown so create it
                var newUnknown = new Fruit
                                 {
Name = "UNKNOWN";
};

EntityFramework.AddToFruits(newUnknown);
EntityFramework.SaveChanges();
defaultValueObject = EntityFramework.Fruits.Single(x=>x.FruitID == newUnknown.FruitID);

object.Fruit = defaultValueObject;
object.Date = DateTime.Now;

UpdateModel(object);
EntityFramework.SaveChanges();

After UpdateModel(object); line is run, the value I set in, for example, Fruit reverts to what was sent over from the form... (which is -1) and then EntityFramework.SaveChanges(); fails FK contrainst (because fruit with id -1 doesn't exist)! Fair enough - but that's not what I assigned to you!

I don't understand why it reverts, because after the first AddToFruits() the unknown is in the database fine... and all up untill UpdateModel(object); it is in object...

If it adds it like I have assigned it there will be no FK contraint exception. But MVC's UpdateModel decides to do something strange and default to (perhaps what came over with form submission) and screws it up.

Why does this happen? How can I fix it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can pass in an array of strings to UpdateModel to tell it what properties to update in your model.

public class Fruit
{
    int ID { get; set; }
    bool IsTasty { get; set; }
    string MyOtherPropert { get; set; }
    DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

...

if (id == -1)
{
    //The object was unknown so create it
    var newUnknown = new Fruit
    {
        Name = "UNKNOWN"
    };
    EntityFramework.AddToFruits (newUnknown);
    EntityFramework.SaveChanges ();

    defaultValueObject = EntityFramework.Fruits.Single (x=>x.FruitID == newUnknown.FruitID);
    defaultValueObject.Date = DateTime.Now;

    UpdateModel (object, new string[] { "IsTasty", "MyOtherProperty" });

    EntityFramework.SaveChanges ();
}

Doing this will make sure all the properties you want updated will be, and those you want left alone won't be touched. In this case, ID and Date are going to be ignored by UpdateModel.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked, by I don't really understand why I have to manually specify which fields to update? The default UpdateModel(object) I would have assumed attempts to update all that have changed? No one specifically answered but it seems that it overrides what has been set in the code and takes it instead from form. The other answer to this question suggests I should do this after the UpdateModel call. Seems like a strange practice and also the exception is thrown on that call, so it would seem strange to write excpetion handling for that then manually update it after - how bizarre! –  baron Jun 14 '11 at 2:54
    
It's updating all of the fields when you don't specify, not just the ones that have changed. This includes the properties that you set on it before before calling UpdateModel. So, to avoid that, you tell MVC exactly which properties you want updated to avoid it overriding the ones you want it to leave alone. –  Jim D'Angelo Jun 14 '11 at 5:23

UpdateModel is not doing anythign strange, it's doing what it's supposed to do; update an object with the values from the form submission.

EF is tracking changes, so it tries to update the db values with what the object has at the time of save.

Solve it by making your changes after running UpdateModel.

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Actually do you mean "Solve it by making your changes after running UpdateModel" and BEFORE calling EntityFramework.SaveChanges() –  baron Jun 14 '11 at 2:57
    
Yes, that's what I meant. You can also do the white list approach mentioned below, but in that case you'll still have to manually tie stuff together. –  Paul Jun 14 '11 at 4:26

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