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I am working on a multi-threaded app. I'm processing reports and keeping track of the number of reports in the current batch as well as the total number of reports processed. Whenever I update the counters, I also need to update a label on the GUI which, since the process is on a separate thread, requires a call to a delegate. Which one of these is the better way to go?

private void UpdateTotalCount(int newValue)
{
    totalCount = newValue;
    if (labelTotalCount.InvokeRequired)
        BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker) delegate() { 
            labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount; });
    else
        labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount;
}

or

private int totalCount;
public int TotalCount
{
    get { return totalCount; }
    set {
        totalCount = value;
        if (labelTotalCount.InvokeRequired)
            BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker) delegate() { 
                labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount; });
        else
            labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount;
    }
}

Edit: Ok, third option.


private void UpdateTotalCountLabel()
{
    if (labelTotalCount.InvokeRequired)
        BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker) delegate() { 
            labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount; });
    else
        labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount;
}
// code elsewhere would look like this
totalCount++;
UpdateTotalCountLabel();
//or
totalCount+= curBatch.Length;
UpdateTotalCountLabel();
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7 Answers

I think using the public accessors is better since it allows more maintanable code in case later on you need to change the way the total value is calculated. In that way, the users of the TotalValue property will not need to worry about your changes since these changes will not affect their code in any way.

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The totalValue property is not used by anyone else. Famous last words, I know, but in this case it is true enough. –  Kevin Mar 10 '09 at 14:07
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I'd use observer design pattern and move the update logic to the observer class.
Don't mix logic and GUI.

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Yes, but only if the complexity of your scenario justifies it. If all you are doing is setting a label, an Observer is way overkill. –  Euro Micelli Mar 10 '09 at 14:07
    
Dividing logic from the GUI never overkill. It is better to make it straight from the start, in other case it won't be accomplished ever. –  Mykola Golubyev Mar 10 '09 at 14:10
    
Sorry; I disagree. It truly depends on the scenario. Adding an additional class and a layer of abstraction simply to "set a label" on a small program can certainly be overkill. The abstraction has to be there to help. –  Euro Micelli Mar 10 '09 at 14:16
    
Yes. For the small programs - it is true. The small programs tend to grow into a Enterprise Applications. He works with reports and multithreading - seams like something serious. –  Mykola Golubyev Mar 10 '09 at 14:22
    
I tend to agree with Mykola. If what seems like a small program at first, can blossom into something massive, it's better to have those patterns in place sooner rather than later when its more expensive to make the improvements. –  Jason Miesionczek Mar 10 '09 at 14:27
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I've always considered Properties to be the equivalent to get/set accessor methods. The rule of thumb for get/set accessors is that they are generally supposed to be for a public interface. If a class is calling it's own accessor methods, they should probably be in another class.

I'd consider it a code smell.

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I agree. It "smelled" as I was writing it. But the first one didn't seem much better. What do you think of the third option I added? –  Kevin Mar 10 '09 at 14:16
    
I think ideally the collection of records would be kept its own object. This collection would have an Updated event which the viewer could then hook into. –  Rick Minerich Aug 25 '09 at 14:27
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I prefer the first or

private void UpdateTotalCount(int newValue)
{
    totalCount = newValue;
    if (labelTotalCount.InvokeRequired)
        BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker) delegate() { 
            labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount; });
    else
        labelTotalCount.Text = "Total reports:" + totalcount;
}

The second one I dislike because it breaks Encapsulation. I would also modify the method name to be more descriptive such as 'UpdateTotalLabelCountAsync' since that is what the method is doing.

Since you are right now are working on the code you could get away with putting it in the property setter. However, when somebody else or even you later go to do maintenance work, you might not see how the label is set. With the method at least you know exactly how the label is set. Also a property is used to store data not updated a UI. It is also possible you might move the property out of the UI layer and store another location.

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I like option 4:

private int totalCount;
public int TotalCount
{
    get { return totalCount; }
    set {
            totalCount = value;
            UpdateTotalCountLabel(totalCount);
        }
}

Clear delineation of intent and scope, easy-to-follow logic -- what's not to love?

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(Update: I misread the order of the options and had them reversed - EM)

Since your code is "doing something" (setting the count label on an outside component), the first form is usually considered better.

However -- and OOP purists will disagree vehemently with me on this -- neither version is terribly wrong. I've done and seen both. I will not rewrite code that looks like #2 just for the heck of it.

In some contexts, the second alternative might actually be more sensible than the first. For example, if the code needs to track the counter for other reasons and sets and gets it a lot, it might make sense to think of the writing to the label as a View side-effect, and the setting/getting of the count property as the main artifact. In that case I would go for the property get/set pair.

UPDATE: About the new third alternative:

I actually don't recommend that idea. Now you have separated, into two separate of code, two actions that always must happen together; that's a net loss. You risk forgetting doing one of them somewhere in the code. Either #1 or #2 are better than #3.

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I actually favor #1, since it clearly conveys that you are doing something, other than setting a field.

However, I agree with Mykola that your UI interaction should not belong to the same class that your backing logic does.

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