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I am trying to use an if condition to compare the objects in a vector, which represent integers, with values of type int, so that I can increment those which appear in the vector according to how many times they appear in the vector. I can't for the life of me get it to compile. Here is the code.

package countjava;
import java.util.*;

public class Count {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Vector vect = new Vector();
        int[] amounts = new int[100];

        for (int i = 0; i <= 9999; i++) {
            VectorIntObject intObject = 
                    new VectorIntObject((int)Math.random() * 100);
            vect.add(intObject);
        }

        Collections.sort(vect);
        for (int i =0; 1 < 40; i++) {
            System.out.println(vect.get(i));
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j <= 99; j++) {
                Object ourObject = vect.get(i);
                if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
                    amounts[j]++;
                }
            }
        }

        for (int j = 0; j <= 99; j++) {
                System.out.println(amounts[j]);
        }
    }
}

class VectorIntObject {
    int value;
    public VectorIntObject(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int getVectorIntValue() {
        return this.value;
    }
}

The comparison should happen in the nested for loops about half way down. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
The compiler is an awesome instrument. One of its greatest features is reporting the error in English. Please reciprocate. –  Kirk Woll Jun 10 '11 at 6:45
    
Is that your real code? Your sorting should fail since your VectorIntObject isn't comparable, and you haven't invoked sort with a custom comparator. –  Kaj Jun 10 '11 at 6:47
    
BTW: Vector is a legacy class which was replace in Java 1.2 (1998) by ArrayList. I wouldn't use it unless you have to. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 10 '11 at 7:00
    
@Peter Lawrey, I don't think in Tertiary level they emphasise that. List and Vectors are still taught but nobody mentions of deprecation of Vector in java. –  Buhake Sindi Jun 10 '11 at 7:03
    
@The Elite, Which is why I thought I might mention it. It was probably a legacy class when the teacher learnt Java. :) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 10 '11 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, this will not compile:

Object ourObject = vect.get(i);
if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
    amounts[j]++;
}

As you're returning an Object from a vector and trying to call getVectorIntValue() without typecasting it to VectorIntObject.

If you're using JDK 5 and higher, I suggest using Generics, and assign a type to Vector

Vector<VectorIntObject> vect = new Vector<VectorIntObject>();

Then this will be valid:

VectorIntObject ourObject = vect.get(i);
if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
    amounts[j]++;
}

Otherwise, typecasting will do

VectorIntObject ourObject = (VectorIntObject)vect.get(i);
if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
    amounts[j]++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Typecasting was my original solution, but it makes the compiler claim "unreachable statement" for the for loop directly above it, and I can't figure out why. I made a mistake posting it without the typecast. –  MassStrike Jun 10 '11 at 7:04
    
Jon Skeet explained to you the unreachable statement code. –  Buhake Sindi Jun 10 '11 at 7:07

EDIT: The "unreachable" statement problem is because of this

for (int i =0; 1 < 40; i++)

1 is always less than 40, so this is an infinite loop. You meant:

for (int i = 0; i < 40; i++)

The problem is that your ourObject variable is of type Object, so you can't call getVectorIntValue on it - that's not a method declared in Object.

You should be using the collection in a generic way. That way the compiler will "know" that the collection contains VectorIntObject references.

Vector<VectorIntObject> vect = new Vector<VectorIntObject>();

// Code as before...

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j <= 99; j++) {
        // Note type of ourObject here, with no need to cast
        VectorIntObject ourObject = vect.get(i);
        if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
            amounts[j]++;
        }
    }
}

Separately, I'd recommend using ArrayList instead of Vector.

If for some reason you can't use Java 1.5 or higher, so can't use generics, you have to cast in your loop instead:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j <= 99; j++) {
        VectorIntObject ourObject = (VectorIntObject) vect.get(i);
        if (ourObject.getVectorIntValue() == j) {
            amounts[j]++;
        }
    }
}

This basically has the same effect at execution-time as the generic version, but the compiler isn't able to give you as much help because it doesn't know what kind of value will be in the collection.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't compete with you. :) –  Buhake Sindi Jun 10 '11 at 6:51
    
Yes, ok, I had it casted this way and should have posted it like that, but when I do, a secondary problem arises. The first line of the above for loop gets a compiler error "unreachable statement". I took the cast off to see if it would fix the "unreachable", which it did, but with the problems you pointed out above. –  MassStrike Jun 10 '11 at 6:57
    
@MassStrike: See my edit (at the top of the answer). This is why you should always quote any compiler errors when you ask a question. –  Jon Skeet Jun 10 '11 at 7:04
    
Haha, ok I'm a moron. Thanks man, vote ups. –  MassStrike Jun 10 '11 at 7:06

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