Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My CustomerActivity class happens also to be a presenter in the MVP sense. In response to actions by the user, the following code is called:

context.update(customer).fire(new Receiver<CustomerProxy>() {
  public void onSuccess(CustomerProxy response) {
    // set the view according to the response
  }
});

When the above code executes, two things happen:

  • I receive an updated copy of the Customer, with which I can refresh the state of the view

  • An EntityProxyChange event is fired

The CustomerActivity listens for EntityProxyChange events because other Activities also make changes to customer records, and I want to keep the CustomerActivity up-to-date.

EntityProxyChange.registerForProxyType(eventBus, CustomerProxy.class,
  new EntityProxyChange.Handler<CustomerProxy>() {
    public void onProxyChange(EntityProxyChange<CustomerProxy> event) {
      fetchCustomer(event.getProxyId());
      // ...but what if it was me that made the change?
    }
  });

Since theupdate method already returns an up-to-date Customer, I don't need to fetch the customer again during processing of the EntityProxyChange; and I don't want to incur the cost of another call to the server if I can avoid it.

I was hoping that the EntityProxyChange class would provide me with the entity's version number, which I could compare with the version of the customer I have cached. No dice.

I suppose I can set some kind of inTheMiddleOfAnUpdateOperation flag, and check it before fetching the customer. Is that what people are doing? The idea makes me gag just a little bit. Can you suggest a better way to write an activity that listens for changes and makes changes to the same entity types?

share|improve this question
    
What is the reason for listening to customer record changes from other Activities ? Unless I'm mistaken, you've only got one Activity active (being displayed) at a time. So what other activities do doesn't matter immediatly. Wouldn't it be better to check for changes to the customer record when the CustomerActivity becomes active and remove the EntityProxyChange Handler ? –  jonasr Jun 10 '11 at 8:21
    
I have two activities running, each pertaining to a different area of the display. One is for viewing/changing the customer settings, and the other for changing the customer name and address details. Perhaps it would be better to have two different entities: Customer and CustomerSettings. They do form part of the one conceptual object though. –  David Jun 10 '11 at 8:58

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure this would work, but you could try to create another event bus :

final EventBus customerActivityEventBus = new SimpleEventBus();

Initialize a new RequestFactory with this eventBus and use it in the CustomerActivity.

customerActivityRequestFactory = GWT.create(CustomerRequestFactory.class);
customerActivityRequestFactory.initialize(customeActivityEventBus);
CustomerRequest context = customerActivityRequestFactory.customerRequest();

Your CustomerActivity will still listen to change events from the main eventBus but will not see the events it fired. In your other activities, listen to events either only from the customerActivityEventBus or from both, depending on what you want.

Of course, keep only one main eventBus to use for events that are not from a Request Factory (ie. ActivityManager, PlaceHistoryHandler, etc ..)

share|improve this answer
    
Not a bad idea. Problem would be that the other activity wouldn't get any EntityProxyChanges from CustomerActivity. I'm starting to think that these two activities need to be disintertwingled. –  David Jun 10 '11 at 11:02
    
In such a case what I did is having 2 separate events thrown by the 2 activities. I know it's much more boiler plate code to be written, but those are serparate events indeed, even in your use case. If I had to refactor my code, now I'd have one event and a flag in it to test wether it is from one activity or the other. –  Christian Achilli Nov 30 '11 at 13:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.