Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Well it is not a program problem. Is there any hint for such quiz? I am thinking about focusing on two random R1, R2, both of which is in range (0, 1). and supposing R2 > R1 and then fulfill two equation:

R1 + (1 - R2) > R2 - R1 // two sticks sum longer then the rest one
|R1 - (1 - R2)| < R2 - R1 // the difference of these two should be shorter the rest one

but I cannot move further...

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Paul R, Chowlett, Peter, ypercube, sdcvvc Jun 10 '11 at 9:48

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
unless I'm ignoring something, the probability is 1: 3 sticks will always form a triangle. –  jcomeau_ictx Jun 10 '11 at 8:23
2  
if your slices are 0.1, 0.1, 0.8, they never form a triangle. –  demaxSH Jun 10 '11 at 8:25
1  
ah, OK. must be time to go to bed :^\ –  jcomeau_ictx Jun 10 '11 at 8:26
    
In case you're interested, I wrote a blog post about this problem a couple of years ago. It has a link to the original video lecture where I first heard the problem. The Broken Stick Experiment –  Bill the Lizard Jun 14 '11 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is 1/4. Here is the explanation.

Let x is the length of the leftmost stick and y is the length of the rightmost stick. Then the middle stick has length n-x-y, if the original stick's length was n.

The possible values for x,y are those for which:

  1. x > 0
  2. y > 0
  3. x + y < n

In the plane Oxy this is equivalent to say that the point (x,y) lies within the triangle with vertices (0, 0), (n, 0), (0, n).

Now these three numbers (x, y, n-x-y) form a triangle if all of the three are satisfied:

  1. x + y > n - x - y <=> x + y < n/2
  2. x + (n - x - y) > y <=> y < n/2
  3. y + (n - x - y) > x <=> x < n/2

Again in the Oxy plane these are satisfied when the point (x,y) lies within the triangle with vertices (0, n/2), (n/2, n/2), (n/2, 0).

The area of this triangle is a quarter of the area of the (0, 0), (n, 0), (0, n) triangle, since it's the 'middle' triangle (whose vertices are the midpoints) of the bigger one.

Here is a simple C# program to verify the answer:

Random r = new Random();
int count = 0, total = 0, tries = 1000000;
double x, y;

for (int i = 0; i < tries; i++)
{
    x = r.NextDouble();
    y = r.NextDouble();
    if (x + y > 0.5 && x < 0.5 && y < 0.5) ++count;
    if (x + y < 1.0) ++total;
}

Console.WriteLine((double)count / total);
share|improve this answer

Think of (r1, r2) as a point in the unit square.

  • Which part of the unit square is allowed for r2 > r1?

  • Which part of that leads to three lengths that can form a triangle?

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a great hint –  demaxSH Jun 10 '11 at 8:30

I have just made a program to verify it, and I found it is 1/4:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int nIsTriangle = 0;
        Random ran = new Random(0);

        int nTry = 1000000;

        for (int i = 0; i < nTry; i++)
        {
            double r1 = ran.NextDouble();
            double r2 = ran.NextDouble();
            if (Check(r1, r2)) nIsTriangle++;
        }

        Console.WriteLine((double)nIsTriangle / (double)nTry);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static bool Check(double r1, double r2)
    {
        double first = Math.Min(r1, r2);
        double second = Math.Abs(r1 - r2);
        double third = 1 - Math.Max(r1, r2);
        bool conditionA = (first + second) > third;
        bool conditionB = Math.Abs(first - second) < third;
        return conditionA && conditionB;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
There are some errors in your Check method. Remember that r1 and r2 are both measured from 0. –  walkytalky Jun 10 '11 at 9:14
    
Opps, I just modify the program, yes it is 1/4 –  demaxSH Jun 10 '11 at 9:45

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.