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I have two example classes

class ClassToResolve
{
    private List<CollectionItem> _coll;

    public ClassToResolve(List<CollectionItem> coll)
    {
        _coll = coll;
    }
}

class CollectionItem
{
    //...
}

and I need to resolve ClassToResolve

var classToResolve = new ClassToResolve(
            new List<CollectionItem>()
                {
                    new CollectionItem(),
                    new CollectionItem(),
                    new CollectionItem()
                }

            );

Now I resolve it in a way

var classToResolve = new ClassToResolve(
            new List<CollectionItem>()
                {
                    unity.Resolve<CollectionItem>(),
                    unity.Resolve<CollectionItem>(),
                    unity.Resolve<CollectionItem>()
                }
            );

Is there a way to resolve ClassToResolve with Unity using dynamic registration?

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Your example doesn't make much sense. Why are you injecting multiple identical instances into the ClassToResolve? –  Steven Jun 10 '11 at 9:23
    
They are not identical. They are identical only in the example. I simplified the example. In fact, this list of objects that inherit / implement from one base class / interface, or a list of differently configured objects. This is very similar to the pattern design "Director" where ClassToResolve = Director and CollectionItem=Strategy (like IRunnable) –  vitidev Jun 11 '11 at 17:12
    
Are they all of the same interface or of different interfaces? What do you actually want to happen? –  Matt Ellen Jun 11 '11 at 21:49
    
This is a very common use case. One object uses a list of other objects. But the problem is already solved. –  vitidev Jun 12 '11 at 20:39
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3 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Unity will understand that T[] (array) dependencies are a list of things (but not IEnumerable<T>, nor List<T>). When you change the constructor of ClassToResolve to take an CollectionItem[] instead of a List<CollectionItem> you can configure your CollectionItem types as follows:

container.RegisterType<CollectionItem, CollectionItemA>("a");
container.RegisterType<CollectionItem, CollectionItemB>("b");
container.RegisterType<CollectionItem, CollectionItemC>("c");
container.RegisterType<CollectionItem, CollectionItemD>("d");

The trick here is to name all the registrations. A default (nameless) registration will never be part of a sequence dependency in Unity.

Now you can resolve ClassToResolve without the need to register it:

container.Resolve<ClassToResolve>();

If you rather inject List<CollectionItem> you can add the following registration:

container.RegisterType<IList<CollectionItem>, CollectionItem[]>();

And for IEnumerable<CollectionItem> you can add the following line:

container
  .RegisterType<IEnumerable<CollectionItem>, CollectionItem[]>();
share|improve this answer
    
-1 You're wrong Unity doesn't understand IEnumerable<T> unless you register it explicitly. –  Hasan Khan Jun 11 '11 at 17:58
    
@Hasan: You are right. I was too quick. Unity understands T[] by default, not IEnumerable<T>. I fixed it. –  Steven Jun 11 '11 at 21:44
    
Great, this is exactly what i need! Would be correct container.RegisterType<IList<CollectionItem>, CollectionItem[]>(); –  vitidev Jun 12 '11 at 20:33
1  
The name parameter is key! –  Honorable Chow Apr 18 '13 at 20:15
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You should register you class in unity

container.RegisterType()

It's better to use interface

share|improve this answer
    
Registration details are not present in the example. Because, this is the question - how to register this collection for auto-resolving it with Unity? –  vitidev Jun 11 '11 at 17:18
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Use this

class ClassToResolve:IEnumerable<CollectionItem>
{
    private List<CollectionItem> _coll;

    public ClassToResolve(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        _coll = container.ResolveAll<CollectionItem>();
    }

    public IEnumerator<CollectionItem> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _coll.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public void Add(CollectionItem)
    {
        this._coll.Add(CollectionItem);
    }
}

now register you class
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5  
Thank you. But I prefer do not use Unity as a service locator. –  vitidev Jun 12 '11 at 20:42
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