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I have a Dictionary with some simple string,string value pairs. The problem is that sometimes the key has to be empty for multiple items, which gives a dictonary error ->

 this key already exists.

Is there another class for this ?

Also, I'm using .NET 2.0 so I can't use the Tuple class ...

        while (nav.MoveToNext())
        {
            if (nav != null)
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(nav.Value))
                {
                    if (nav.HasChildren)
                    {
                        navChildren = nav.Clone();
                        navChildren.MoveToFirstChild();
                        if (navChildren != null)
                            if (!veldenToSkip.Contains(nav.LocalName.Trim().ToLower())
                                && !nav.LocalName.StartsWith("opmerkingen_"))
                                itemTable.Add(nav.LocalName.Replace("_", " "), navChildren.Value);
                                 //normal key and value
                        while (navChildren.MoveToNext())
                        {
                            if (!veldenToSkip.Contains(nav.LocalName.Trim().ToLower()))
                            {
                                if (navChildren != null)
                                {
                                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(navChildren.Value))
                                    {
                                        itemTable.Add("", navChildren.Value);
                                        //Add blank keys
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

I only want a structure like this:

value1    value2
value3    value4
          value5
          value6
value7    value8
...
share|improve this question
    
1  
Why would you need a value pair in your dictionary without a Key? How will you find it afterwards? Consider not adding the value pair untill you have a key or turning your dictionary around (switching Key and Value). –  InBetween Jun 10 '11 at 11:09
    
@aligray I don't think that's the same, he wants to allow multiple entries for the same key, not multiple keys per entry. –  George Duckett Jun 10 '11 at 11:09
    
Multimap –  dtb Jun 10 '11 at 11:15
1  
And what do you want returned for an empty key (when mult. values are stored) ? –  Henk Holterman Jun 10 '11 at 11:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just generate a pseudo-key...

int emptyKey = 0;

...
if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(navChildren.Value))
{
   string key = "Empty_" + emptyKey.ToString();
   emptyKey ++;
   itemTable.Add(key, navChildren.Value);
   //Add blank keys
}

You'll still have the Values, but note that a Dictionary does not preserve order (of Adding).

share|improve this answer
    
mmmmyeah that will work too :-) Thanks –  Run CMD Jun 10 '11 at 11:47

you could implement the ILookup interface ...

wrap a Dictionary< TKey,List< TValue > >

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the ILookup interface seems to be available from .NET 3.5 only, I'm using .NET 2.0 .... –  Run CMD Jun 10 '11 at 11:36

Because having multiple values with the same key sort of negates the utility of a dictionary, a List of KeyValuePairs frequently makes more sense:

List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> itemTable = new List<KeyValuePair<string, string>>();
share|improve this answer

you can use a Dictionary<yourKeyType, List<yourObjectType>>. Like that you can add multiple items per Key... Before add you check if a List already exists for your key --> add it, otherwise create a new List. More elegant to wrap it in a class which handles it internally.

example of a class you could use:

class MultiValueDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    private Dictionary<TKey, List<TValue>> _InternalDict = new Dictionary<TKey, List<TValue>>();

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        if (this._InternalDict.ContainsKey(key))
            this._InternalDict[key].Add(value);
        else
            this._InternalDict.Add(key, new List<TValue>(new TValue[]{value}));
    }

    public List<TValue> GetValues(TKey key)
    {
        if (this._InternalDict.ContainsKey(key))
            return this._InternalDict[key];
        else
            return null;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

try using Tuple:

http://sankarsan.wordpress.com/2009/11/29/tuple-in-c-4-0/

updated

ok now the post says .Net 2.0 so... this answer cannot work!

I think this can be useful:

Dictionary w/ null key?

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that applies, he wants to allow multiple entries for the same key, not multiple keys per entry –  George Duckett Jun 10 '11 at 11:11
    
The post tells he wants to use a dictionary string,string with sometimes null key. I think Tuple can work. –  danyolgiax Jun 10 '11 at 11:15
    
Updated the post! –  danyolgiax Jun 10 '11 at 11:20
    
Looks like he edited after i posted that. It's less clear to me what he wants now, your answer may well be relevent. –  George Duckett Jun 10 '11 at 11:22

Although very verbose, this could work:

class Pair<A, B>
{
    public A Key { get; set; }
    public B Value{ get; set; }
}

var items = new List<Pair<string, string>>();

items.Add(new Pair<string,string>() { Key = "", Value = "Test" });
items.Add(new Pair<string,string>() { Key = "", Value = "Test" });
share|improve this answer
1  
How do you lookup a list? –  Ritch Melton Jun 10 '11 at 11:21
    
Yeah just tried it! –  aligray Jun 10 '11 at 11:23

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