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I am new to Java. Just now I'm practing. If I give input as 6, output should be like this:

1
2 3
4 5 6

Here I'm posting code that I tried:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Number {
    public static void main(String args[]){

        int n;
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        n = in.nextInt();
        in.close();
        int k = 1;
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) 
        {
            // k=i;
            for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
            {
                System.out.print(" " + k);
                if (n==k)
                {
                    break;
                }
                k++;
            }       
            System.out.println("\n");
        }
    }
}

If I input n=4,i t show the output as:

1

2 3

4

4
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Idenation meka your code readable. This is the minimum to do when asking for help (and it will eventually make the solution of your problem obvious). –  deadalnix Jun 10 '11 at 11:52
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5 Answers

Your break will only exit the inner loop (the one that loops over j). The outer loop will continue to run, leading to extra numbers being printed.

You need to either replace it with a return; or System.exit(0), or put a label in front of your outer loop (the one that loops over i) and use a labeled break.

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return is probably the best option. –  Aaron Digulla Jun 10 '11 at 11:55
    
I agree. Especially when the "print a number pyramid for n" code is extracted to a separate method. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 10 '11 at 11:55
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Properly indent your code. It helps your brain to understand.

That said, the solution is two loops with three variables.

You need a loop that goes from 1 to n.

An inner loop that goes from 1 to the number of elements per line.

And you need the number of elements per line. This variable increases every time the inner loop is executed.

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It's a badly worded question, but I'm going to guess you want to know why the extra 4?

The reason is you have nested loops, so the break only breaks one loop. Here's how you break out of the outer loop:

outer: for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
...
break outer;

The label outer is arbitrary - you can call it fred is you want.

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int n = 6; // target

int i = 0;
int nextRowAt = 2;
int currentRow = 1;
while (++i <= n) {
    if (i == nextRowAt) {
        System.out.println();
        nextRowAt = ++currentRow + i;
    }
    System.out.print("" + i + " ");
}

But unless you understand it and can properly explain the code, you will probably get a fail on your assignment.

My suggestion is to start by creating/understanding on pen and paper. Write out the sequences and figure out how the algorithm should work. THEN you start coding it.

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public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    int n = 10;
    int k = 1;
    boolean breakOuter = false;
    for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) 
    {
    for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
    {
        System.out.print(" " + k);
        if (n==k)
        {
        breakOuter = true;
        break;
        }
        k++;
    }
    if(breakOuter) break;
    System.out.println("\n");
    }
}
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thank u..nw im clear.. –  user570786 Jun 10 '11 at 12:46
    
That's ... un-elegant. I'm not a huge fan of labeled breaks, but it would be much nicer here. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 10 '11 at 13:00
    
Labeled breaks feels kinda Basic, in all senses of the word :) –  pap Jun 10 '11 at 14:47
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