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Is there a way for implementers of an interface where a ReadOnly property is defined to make it a complete Read/Write Property ?

Imagine I define an interface to provide a ReadOnly Property (i.e., just a getter for a given value) :

Interface SomeInterface

    'the interface only say that implementers must provide a value for reading
    ReadOnly Property PublicProperty As String

End Interface

This means implementers must commit to providing a value. But I would like a given implementer to also allow setting that value. In my head, this would mean providing the Property's setter as part of the implementation, doing something like this :

Public Property PublicProperty As String Implements SomeInterface.PublicProperty
    Get
        Return _myProperty
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        _myProperty = value
    End Set
End Property

but this will not compile as, for the VB compiler, the implementer no longer implements the interface (because it is no longer ReadOnly).

Conceptually, this should work, because, in the end, it just means Implement the getter from the Interface, and add a setter method. For "normal methods", this would be no problem.

Is there some way of doing it, without resorting to "interface hiding" or "home-made" SetProperty() method, and style having the Property behave like a Read/Write property in the implementations ?

Thanks !

--UPDATE-- (I have moved this question to a separate Question) My question is really : "why can't this be done in VB.NET", when the following is valid in C#.NET?" :

interface IPublicProperty
{
    string PublicProperty { get; }
}

with implementation :

public class Implementer:IPublicProperty
    {
        private string _publicProperty;

        public string PublicProperty
        {
            get
            {
                return _publicProperty;
            }
            set
            {
                _publicProperty = value;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
The update is a good question but not one I can answer, I prefer the c# implementation. –  Jodrell Jun 14 '11 at 8:24
    
I think I will post it in a separate question. Thanks anyway ! –  tsimbalar Jun 14 '11 at 8:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the end, I ended up with a solution that matches my goal :

  • users that access via the Interface see at least a getter
  • users that access the implementation can Read and Write.

I did this "shadowing" the implemented property like this :

'users who access through interface see only the Read accessor
Public ReadOnly Property PublicProperty_SomeInterface As String Implements SomeInterface.PublicProperty
    Get
        Return _myProperty
    End Get
End Property


'users who work with the implementation have Read/Write access
Public Property PublicProperty_SomeInterface As String
    Get
        Return _myProperty
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        _myProperty = value
    End Set
End Property

Then, depending on how you use it, you can do :

Dim implementorAsInterface As SomeInterface = New InterfaceImplementor()
logger.Log(implementor.PublicProperty) 'read access is always ok
implementor.PublicProperty = "toto" 'compile error : readOnly access

Dim implementor As InterfaceImplementor = New InterfaceImplementor()
implementor.PublicProperty = "toto" 'write access
share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially a "some other method" approach, PublicProperty is not accesible from the interface. You could implement some "shadowing" by calling the PublicProperty_FromInterface getter from the PublicProperty getter. Additionaly, you could rename PublicProperty_FromInterface to PublicProperty_SomeInterface, just in case you implement another interface that also requires a PublicProperty definition. –  Jodrell Jun 14 '11 at 7:28
    
You are right, I'll update my code. Thanks ! –  tsimbalar Jun 14 '11 at 7:51
    
I get "'Public ReadOnly Property Name As String' and 'Public Property Name As String' cannot overload each other because they differ only by 'ReadOnly' or 'WriteOnly'". I do not understand how you made it work. –  Michal B. Jan 30 at 10:43

There is nothing at a CLI level which prevents this type of implementation and as you've demonstrated it's already supported by C#. The VB.Net language just doesn't support this style of implementation.

Knowing why though is a bit tough since the decision is almost 10 years removed at this point. Very likely it was just an over site at the time interface implementation was designed.

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You can't do it as the interface requires that you implement a ReadOnly Property.

Properties don't allow overloading so there is no way to implement a non-ReadOnly and also a ReadOnly.

I would suggest you either implement a Custom Setter or drop the ReadOnly from the Interface.

Without details of why you want to do this it is hard to suggest the best solution

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I understand that if the Interface says "ReadOnly" then implementers should be "ReadOnly" ... but it can also be understood as : "implementers must provide, AT LEAST, read access to that property". I ended up "hiding" the implemented method (see my answer) –  tsimbalar Jun 14 '11 at 6:15

The simplest answer is to create two properties. One is public and available to users who have direct access to your class. The other is a private implementation of the Interface. When users access your class via the Interface, the private property becomes public. For example:

private _myProperty As String
Public Property MyProperty() As String
  Get
    Return _myProperty
  End Get
  Set (value as String)
    _myProperty = value
  End Set
End Property
Private Readonly Property __MyProperty() As String Implements IMyInterface.MyProperty
  Get
    Return Me.MyProperty
  End Get
End Property

There really isn't any other clean way to do this in VB.NET. Shadowing is a solution, but not ideal if you don't need the extra class.

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Now supported in Visual Studio 2015.

What's New for Visual Basic

Readonly Interface Properties

You can implement readonly interface properties using a readwrite property. The interface guarantees minimum functionality, and it does not stop an implementing class from allowing the property to be set.

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I know, I posted the update on one of my other questions : stackoverflow.com/questions/6341184/… –  tsimbalar Aug 26 at 12:52

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