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I am wondering if someone can please explain this to me:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        AnotherDerivedClass d = new AnotherDerivedClass();
        Console.WriteLine(d.PrintMessage());

        IMsg m = d as IMsg;
        //Why this prints BaseClass.
        //How does it know that IMsg is implemented in the BaseClass.
        Console.WriteLine(m.PrintMessage());

        IMsg n = d as DerivedClass;
        //Why this prints BaseClass and not DerivedClass
        Console.WriteLine(n.PrintMessage());

        Console.Read();
    }
}

public interface IMsg
{
    string PrintMessage();
}

public class BaseClass : IMsg
{
    public string PrintMessage()
    {
        return "BaseClass";
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public new string PrintMessage()
    {
        return "DerivedClass";
    }
}

public class AnotherDerivedClass : DerivedClass
{
    public new string PrintMessage()
    {
        return "AnotherDerivedClass";
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the question you have? ... Ah, I see you have questions as comments in your code :) –  Kieren Johnstone Jun 10 '11 at 14:20
2  
It is much better to ask the questions in the question body, not in code comments as people gloss over code listings looking for the question... –  Oded Jun 10 '11 at 14:21
    
I thought it will be easy for people to understand what i want to understand if i ask question in the code comment. –  Asdfg Jun 10 '11 at 14:24
    
vote for close? Any reason? –  Asdfg Jun 10 '11 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have replaced the implementation in your derived classes, not overridden them. If you use the BaseClass, the original implementation will be used.

You need to make the method in the base virtual:

public class BaseClass : IMsg
{

    public BaseClass()
    {

    }

    public virtual string PrintMessage()
    {
        return "BaseClass";
    }
}

and override in the derived class:

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass()
    {

    }

    public override string PrintMessage()
    {
        return "DerivedClass";
    }
}

to get the behaviour you specified.

share|improve this answer
    
What i understand is "New" keyword will hide the baseclass implementation. So if the baseclass implementation is hidden, isnt it suppose to call New implementation? –  Asdfg Jun 10 '11 at 14:27
2  
@Asdfg, that's not how it works. Use new when the base method does not do what you want and it is not virtual and cannot be overriden. However, this only hides the base implementation as long as you are operating with through a reference to the derived type. References to the object via the base class will continue to use the base behavior. That is why it is absolutely preferrable to use the virtual modifier on base methods you truly intend to override in derived classes. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 10 '11 at 14:33
    
Thank you for the explanation. –  Asdfg Jun 10 '11 at 20:00

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