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I'm trying to get a deeper hold on prototypal inheritance and class creation (I know, there are other ways, but for the purpose of this I'm trying to grasp prototypes.) My question is: Using the following code example, is there a way to create private variables inside of Tree and Fruit that will not be returned with the function, but is still accessible to the prototype functions genus and bulk?

var Tree = function ( name, size ) { 
    this.name = name;
    this.size = size;
};

Tree.prototype.genus = function(){
    return ((typeof this.name !== 'undefined') ? this.name : 'Hybridicus Maximus');
};
Tree.prototype.bulk = function(){
    return ((typeof this.size !== 'undefined') ? this.size : '8') + ' ft';
};


var Fruit = function( name, size ) { 
    this.name = name;
    this.size = size;
};

Fruit.prototype = new Tree();
// Fruit.prototype = Tree.prototype; -- I know this can be used, too.

Fruit.prototype.bulk =  function(){
    return ((typeof this.size !== 'undefined') ? Math.floor(this.size / 2) : '4') + ' lbs';
};

var pine = new Tree('Pine', 9);
var apple = new Fruit('Apple', 6);

console.log(pine.genus(), pine.bulk()); // Outputs: "Pine 9 ft"
console.log(apple.genus(), apple.bulk()); // Outputs: "Apple 3 lbs"

EDIT: I'm trying to replace this.name and this.size with private variables that can be accessed in the prototype functions. Sorry for the lack of clarity!

share|improve this question
    
Could you not tag language questions "reinforcement-learning"? – Don Reba Jun 10 '11 at 20:57
1  
@Don-Reba, yeah, sorry about that. I tagged it as "learning" and it must've bumped it to reinforcement. EDIT They have an appropriate tag now for prototypal-inheritance that wasn't available when I made this. Switched to it. Sorry for the confusion. – buzzedword Jun 13 '11 at 14:33
    
    
@ecampver yeah, they asked the same question I did. – buzzedword Jan 15 '14 at 22:59
    
Actually, there is a way. Check this answer. – Duarte Cunha Leão Jul 18 '14 at 0:11
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes. You can do this:

(function() {
  var private = "hi";

  Tree.prototype.genus = function(){
    return ((typeof this.name !== 'undefined') ? this.name : 'Hybridicus Maximus');
  };
  Tree.prototype.bulk = function(){
    return ((typeof this.size !== 'undefined') ? this.size : '8') + ' ft';
  };
})();

Now, that'll provide a private variable that those functions can see, but it'll be a private "class" variable - all instances will share the same variable, in other words. If you want a private variable per instance, you have to do that in the constructor (or "init" method, or whatever), meaning the methods that share those privates would also have to be created there. (You could of course put a function on the prototype that would create the instance methods at construction time.)

edit — One thing you could do is use a technique like this to build a mechanism like jQuery's ".data()", so that you'd have a class variable that acts as a place to keep per-instance values. It'd be kind-of clunky, but it'd be workable.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry-- added a clarity edit. Trying to replace this.name and this.size with the private variables. – buzzedword Jun 10 '11 at 14:45
    
I do like this though, this is a very useful pattern for a few other projects that use prototypes. Thanks! -- upvoted. – buzzedword Jun 10 '11 at 14:56

This is what I wrote about in a blog post about Classes, Private Members, & Prototypal Inheritance in JavaScript. Basically you want to create a private variable accessor function unique to every object and then have those prototype methods call that private accessor function, supplying it with the key that is only available within the closure:

(function(_) {
  Tree = function ( name, size ) { 
    var hidden = {
      name: name,
      size: size
    };
    this._ = function($) {
      return _ === $ && hidden;
    };
  };

  Tree.prototype.genus = function(){
    return ((typeof this._(_).name !== 'undefined') ? this._(_).name : 'Hybridicus Maximus');
  };
  Tree.prototype.bulk = function(){
    return ((typeof this._(_).size !== 'undefined') ? this._(_).size : '8') + ' ft';
  };

  Fruit = function( name, size ) { 
    Tree.apply(this, arguments);
  };
  Fruit.prototype = new Tree();
  // Fruit.prototype = Tree.prototype; -- I know this can be used, too.

  Fruit.prototype.bulk =  function(){
    return ((typeof this._(_).size !== 'undefined') ? Math.floor(this._(_).size / 2) : '4') + ' lbs';
  };
})({});



var pine = new Tree('Pine', 9);
var apple = new Fruit('Apple', 6);

console.log(pine.genus(), pine.bulk()); // Outputs: "Pine 9 ft"
console.log(apple.genus(), apple.bulk()); // Outputs: "Apple 3 lbs"

console.log(pine._(), pine._({})); // Outputs: "false false" because outside of closure

You will notice that the last line shows that private variables are not accessible outside of the closure and thusly can't be retrieved by third-party code unless made available by an accessor function.

share|improve this answer
1  
You still can hijack that local key object (_) by overwriting the ._ method and then access all "hidden" data. – Bergi Feb 7 '13 at 21:24

It can be easily achieved like this

function SharedPrivate(){
  var private = "secret";
  this.constructor.prototype.getP = function(){return private}
  this.constructor.prototype.setP = function(v){ private = v;}
}

var o1 = new SharedPrivate();
var o2 = new SharedPrivate();

console.log(o1.getP()); // secret
console.log(o2.getP()); // secret
o1.setP("Pentax Full Frame K1 is on sale..!");
console.log(o1.getP()); // Pentax Full Frame K1 is on sale..!
console.log(o2.getP()); // Pentax Full Frame K1 is on sale..!
o2.setP("And it's only for $1,795._");
console.log(o1.getP()); // And it's only for $1,795._

Obviously the key point is to create an access route to a private variable by utilizing a closure and then sharing this access point among the objects to be created. Utilizing the access point as a prototype of the objects to be created for natural sharing is the ideal case. Accordingly the same functionality can be achieved by utilizing the factory pattern and Object.create() as follows;

function SharedPrivate(){
var priv = "secret";
return {gp : function(){return priv},
        sp : function(v){priv = v}
       }
}
sharedProto = SharedPrivate(); // priv is now under closure to be shared
var p1 = Object.create(sharedProto); // sharedProto becomes o1.__proto__
var p2 = Object.create(sharedProto); // sharedProto becomes o2.__proto__

JavaScript prototypical structure is golden..!

share|improve this answer
    
Never. ever. assign to prototype properties from within your constructor. – Bergi Apr 7 at 23:32
    
@Bergi Thanks for the comment... I keep hearing this cliche time to time yet neither could think of a justifiable reason myself nor heard anybody talking more than this sentence. I tend to believe it's nothing more than a gossip in the air. Could you please elaborate me on what are the dangers of adding two tiny functions to the prototype of a function that's also created by myself. – Redu Apr 8 at 9:13
    
It's not a cliche: it just doesn't make sense, and it has undesirable behaviour. You already seem to understand this, as you named that class "SharedPrivate", and even seem to expect the usually undesired behaviour where o1 interferes with o2; but even if you want to create a static, shared variable your approach doesn't work. Just try to create an o3 somewhere in that sequence of calls… The problem is not with adding to the prototype, but with doing so in the constructor. – Bergi Apr 8 at 10:35
    
Thank you for taking your time to explain. My bad.. i forgot to mention that my critic to the "Never. ever. assign to prototype properties from within your constructor" sentence was only related as per the pattern i have shown above. Otherwise of course you shouldn't modify the prototype from within the constructor. However, makes sense or not, if you need to create a shared private among several objects, then they have to be created at once together since as you have also figured out. There is no way to do this with a constructor without touching the prototype within itself. – Redu Apr 8 at 11:01
    
No, the sentence did not just relate to your specific code. There really is never a good reason to do that - "Otherwise of course you should modify the prototype from within the constructor." is plainly wrong. Or can you name a reason? If you want to share state across instances, you shouldn't create that state in (the last call of) the constructor. Just put it outside of the constructor, and wrap everything in an IIFE if you need privacy. – Bergi Apr 8 at 11:07

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