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I've been told that a handle is a sort of "void" pointer. But what exactly does "void pointer" mean and what is its purpose. Also, what does "somehandle = GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE); do?

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You mean a Windows API HANDLE rather than handles in general? –  Rup Jun 10 '11 at 14:23
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A Windows API Handle –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:28
    
(I think that's what it is) –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A handle in the general sense is an opaque value that uniquely identifies an object. In this context, "opaque" means that the entity distributing the handle (e.g. the window manager) knows how handles map to objects but the entities which use the handle (e.g. your code) do not.

This is done so that they cannot get at the real object unless the provider is involved, which allows the provider to be sure that noone is messing with the objects it owns behind its back.

Since it's very practical, handles have traditionally been integer types or void* because using primitives is much easier in C than anything else. In particular, a lot of functions in the Win32 API accept or return handles (which are #defined with various names: HANDLE, HKEY, many others). All of these types map to void*.

Update:

To answer the second question (although it might be better asked and answered on its own):

GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE) returns a handle to the standard input device. You can use this handle to read from your process's standard input.

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Ok. Because I have been doing some keyboard and mouse imput type things, but I feel kind of lost without knowing what a handle is. So it is a value that essentially points to something that only the window knows? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:31
    
Good answer. I would simply add that the fact they map to void* is simply how they are implemented in some version of Windows. It could change in a later version (though it probably won't), and it isn't really important. You should think of the HANDLE types as simply a unique identifier and leave it at that. You aren't supposed to know anything else about them. –  andrewdski Jun 10 '11 at 14:32
    
Is it used as a reference point then? For the function to manipulate and use however it wants? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:33
    
@someguy: It "points to" something that only the kernel (of which the window manager is a subsystem) knows how to get to. I would prefer the verb "identifies" instead of "points to" because when talking about C, "point" is a word that carries strong connotations. The HANDLE is actually a pointer, but using it as such goes against the very reason we go to this trouble in the first place. Don't do it. –  Jon Jun 10 '11 at 14:33
    
Just to clarify in case it makes a difference, I'm using c++. –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:37

A HANDLE isn't necessarily a pointer or a double pointer, it may be an index in an OS table as well as anything else. It's defined for convenience as a void * because often is used actually as a pointer, and because in C void * is a type on which you can't perform almost any operation.

The key point is that you must think at it as some opaque token that represents a resource managed by the OS; passing it to the appropriate functions you tell them to operate on such object. Because it's "opaque", you shouldn't change it or try to dereference it: just use it with functions that can work with it.

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A HANDLE is a pointer to a pointer, it's pretty much as simple as that.

So to get the pointer to the data, you'd have to dereference it first.

GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE) will return the handle to the stdin stream - standard input. That's either the console or a file/stream if you invoke from the command prompt with a '<' character.

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HANDLE is defined as void * in winnt.h, not as a pointer to a pointer. –  nbt Jun 10 '11 at 14:27
    
Ok Thanks. That makes more sense. So it is pretty much a NULL pointer –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:28
    
@someguy No it isn't. –  nbt Jun 10 '11 at 14:29
    
A handle in the general sense is an opaque identifier. Therefore, a HANDLE (specific case) should definitely not be thought of as a pointer to anything, for the C definition of "pointer". –  Jon Jun 10 '11 at 14:29
    
Ok. Because I have been doing some keyboard and mouse imput type things, but I feel kind of lost without knowing what a handle is. So it is a value that essentially points to something that only the window knows? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:31

A Windows HANDLE is effectively an index into an array of void pointers, plus a few other things. A void pointer (void*) is the pointer that points to an unknown type and should be avoided at all costs in C++- however the Windows API is C-compatible and uses it to avoid having to expose Windows internal types.

GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE) means, get the HANDLE associated to the Standard output stream.

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Ok. So what is meant in the previous answer by a pointer to a pointer? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:27
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The whole point about HANDLE is that it isn't an index into an array of anything. It is simply an opaque pimpl type. Yes, the underlying implementation that is in use today might be known, but it could change completely tomorrow. –  David Heffernan Jun 10 '11 at 14:29
    
Ok. Because I have been doing some keyboard and mouse imput type things, but I feel kind of lost without knowing what a handle is. So it is a value that essentially points to something that only the window knows? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:31
    
You mean, the standard input stream. Duh. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 10 '11 at 14:32
    
Is it used as a reference point then? For the function to manipulate and use however it wants? –  someguy Jun 10 '11 at 14:33

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