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I'm just learning myself how to use hashMaps, can someone check this piece of code I have written and tell me if it's correct? The idea is to have a list of staff working in a company, I want to add and remove staff from a hashMap.

public class Staff
{
    private HashMap<String, String>id;

    public Staff(String name, String number)
    {
        id = new HashMap<>(name,number);
    }

    public addStaff()
    {
       id.add("Joe","1234A2);   
    }

    public removeStaff()
    {
       id.remove("Joe","1234A2);
    }
}
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your class, you need to change / add things to look like:

private HashMap<String, String> id;

public Staff(String name, String number)
{
    id = new HashMap<String, String>();
}

public addStaff()
{
   id.put("Joe","1234A2");   
}

public removeStaff()
{
   id.remove("Joe");
}

to use a HashMap properly.

Note that addStaff() and removeStaff() are not likely to be very useful for most purposes because they only add and remove the one staff member "Joe". A more useful way of doing things would be

public void addStaff(StaffMember member) {
   id.put(member.getName(), member);
}

public StaffMember get(String name) {
   // this will return null if the member's name isn't a key in the map.
   return id.get(name);
}

What makes a Map different from other data structures is that it has a "key" which allows you to possibly retrieve one item. You cannot use a Map in the ways that give you a boost in performance if you don't have the item's key beforehand.

Note that HashMaps require keys to follow the rules for equality correctly in addition to equal items returning the same hashCode. Basically if on object a and another object b are considered equal, then

// Reflexive property
a.equals(a) must return true

// Symmetric property
if (a.equals(b)) then b.equals(a) must return true

// Transitive property
if (a.equals(b) and b.equals(c)) then a.equals(c) must return true

// Additional requirements to make hash related algorithms work properly
a.hashCode() == b.hashCode() // must be true

The hashCode() part is above and beyond simple equality, and is required for the HashMap to work correctly.

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2  
HashMap.get() does not remove the object from the map. –  Karl Øie Jun 10 '11 at 14:36
    
Un-terminated strings? –  Mikaveli Jun 10 '11 at 14:36
    
@Mikaveli, sorry it was a cut and paste from the original code above. Didn't notice that the strings were unterminated as the method names on the map being wrong led to tunnel vision. –  Edwin Buck Jun 10 '11 at 14:40
1  
@ZeroPage, thanks. It's fixed now. –  Edwin Buck Jun 10 '11 at 14:48
    
id.remove("Joe"); only. This method only takes 1 argument. –  toto2 Jun 10 '11 at 14:58
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Looks good to me, however I would have created a Employee class and use a unique id for each staff member.

class Employee {
  Integer id;
  String name;
}

Map<Integer, Employee> staff = new HashMap<Integer, Employee>();

This way you can extend the staff info at will without redefining your staff map. Also never assume that human names are unique.

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Yeah sorry shoulda went with the staff number as the key and the name as the value –  user445714 Jun 10 '11 at 14:41
    
@user445714: no need to be sorry, it's learning :-) –  Karl Øie Jun 10 '11 at 14:45
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First of all please read this http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Map.html and a lot of things will be more clear for you. Then take a look here for some samples:

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[read this], read what? [look here], look at what? Provide a link when pointing to something. –  Buhake Sindi Jun 10 '11 at 14:51
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