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I imagine this is common enough that it's a solved problem, but being a bit of a newbie with Loofah and Nokogiri I haven't found the solution yet.

I'm using Loofah, a HTML scrubber library that wraps Nokogiri, to scrub some HTML text for display. However, that text sometimes happen to things like e-mail addresses and such between < and > characters, for example, < foo@domain.com >. Loofah is considering that as an HTML or XML tag, and is stripping it away from the text.

Is there a way to prevent this from happening while still doing a good job of scrubbing away the actual tags?

Edit: Here's a failing test case:

require 'test/unit'
require 'test/unit/ui/console/testrunner'
require 'nokogiri'

MAGICAL_REGEXP = /<([^(?:\/|!\-\-)].*)>/

def filter_html(content)
  # Current approach in a gist: We capture content enclosed in angle brackets.
  # Then, we check if the excerpt right after the opening bracket is a valid HTML
  # tag. If it's not, we substitute the matched content (which is the captured
  # content enclosed in angle brackets) for the captured content enclosed in
  # the HTML entities for the angle brackets. This does not work with nested
  # HTML tags, since regular expressions are not meant for this.

  content.to_s.gsub(MAGICAL_REGEXP) do |excerpt|
    capture = $1
    Nokogiri::HTML::ElementDescription[capture.split(/[<> ]/).first] ? excerpt : "&lt;#{capture}&gt;"
  end
end

class HTMLTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @raw_html = <<-EOS
<html>
<foo@bar.baz>
<p><foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz></p>
<p>
<foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz>
</p>
< don't erase this >
</html>
EOS

    @filtered_html = <<-EOS
<html>
&lt;foo@bar.baz&gt;
<p>&lt;foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz&gt;</p>
<p>
&lt;foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz&gt;
</p>
&lt; don't erase this &gt;
</html>
EOS
  end

  def test_filter_html
    assert_equal(@filtered_html, filter_html(@raw_html))
  end
end

# Can you make this test pass?
Test::Unit::UI::Console::TestRunner.run(HTMLTest)

We're currently using some pretty evil regex hackery to try and accomplish this, but as the comment above states, it doesn't work for tags "nested" inside non-tags. And we actually want to preserve the <b class="highlight"> elements as well.

The sample below isn't using Loofah, but the application itself does in other places so it wouldn't be hard to add it here. We're just not sure of what configuration options we should use, if any.

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1  
Does the text actually contain a "<" character or is it a "&lt;" entity? –  Andy Waite Jun 10 '11 at 15:39
1  
It would be easier to answer if you provided a minimal script that displays the problem (along with its input and output). –  Mark Thomas Jun 10 '11 at 23:02
    
@mark-thomas : I've edited the question to add a failing test case. I hope it sheds some light on the problem. –  Bira Jun 13 '11 at 21:14
    
@andy-waite : As the test above shows, the text actually contains a < character. –  Bira Jun 13 '11 at 21:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As the main issue was HTML tags enclosed in HTML entities angle brackets -- which is totally mangled by Nokogiri -- we solved it by just removing the aforementioned HTML tags, escaping the non-HTML-tag angle brackets and then putting the HTML tags back. It sounds a little hackish but it's working perfectly. Our first goal was escaping email addresses enclosed in angle brackets, but this approach (supposedly) works for any kind text.

# Does not run on ruby 1.9

require 'test/unit'
require 'test/unit/ui/console/testrunner'
require 'nokogiri'
require 'active_support/secure_random'

def filter_html(content)
  # Used to mark highlighted words.
  random_hex = SecureRandom.hex(6)

  # Remove highlighting.
  highlighted_terms = []
  without_highlighting = content.to_s.gsub(/<b class="highlight">(.*?)<\/b>/) do |match|
    highlighted_terms << $1
    "highlight-#{random_hex}:#{$1}"
  end

  # Escape non-HTML angle brackets.
  escaped_content = without_highlighting.to_s.gsub(/<(?:\s*\/)?([^!\-\-].*?)>/) do |excerpt|
    capture = $1
    tag = capture.split(/[^a-zA-Z1-6]/).reject(&:empty?).first
    !!Nokogiri::HTML::ElementDescription[tag] ? excerpt : "&lt;#{capture}&gt;"
  end

  # Add highlighting back.
  highlighted_terms.uniq.each do |term|
    escaped_content.gsub!(/highlight-#{random_hex}:(#{term})/) do |match|
      "<b class=\"highlight\">#{$1}</b>"
    end
  end

  escaped_content
end

class HTMLTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @raw_html = <<-EOS
      <html>
        <foo@bar.baz>
        <p><foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz></p>
        <p>
          <foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz>
        </p>
        <    don't erase this   >
      </html>
    EOS

    @filtered_html = <<-EOS
      <html>
        &lt;foo@bar.baz&gt;
        <p>&lt;foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz&gt;</p>
        <p>
          &lt;foo@<b class="highlight">bar</b>.baz&gt;
        </p>
        &lt;    don't erase this   &gt;
      </html>
    EOS
  end

  def test_filter_html
    assert_equal(@filtered_html, filter_html(@raw_html))
  end
end

# It passes!
Test::Unit::UI::Console::TestRunner.run(HTMLTest)
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1  
It's not really a hack to do it that way. Not all programming problems are solved in a straight-ahead or elegant manner, especially when it comes to dealing with HTML and XML. Sometimes we have to get really dirty and just get it to work, and then go somewhere to get the taste out of our mouth. It's part of the task. –  the Tin Man Jul 19 '12 at 20:05
    
To clarify something: "the main issue was HTML tags enclosed in HTML entities angle brackets -- which is totally mangled by Nokogiri". Nokogiri isn't mangling the HTML, it's trying to make sense of malformed markup, closing tags that weren't closed correctly, or adjusting the embedding so the HTML meets the specs. You can use the errors method to look at the parsed doc's errors to see what Nokogiri had to do. See stackoverflow.com/a/14515622/128421 for an example of how I'd use Nokogiri to clean up malformed HTML. –  the Tin Man Jan 25 '13 at 6:23

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