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I have a dataset with 10 columns. The first column is an unique identifier. The 9 other columns are related attributes. For now, let's just say they are integers. If needed, the data could easily be pivoted to a key-value.

Ex:

id|attr1|attr2|attr3|...
a |  2  |  5  |  7  |...
b |  3  |  1  |null |...
c |  2  |null |null |...
d |  1  |  2  |  5  |...
e |  2  |  1  |  3  |...

I'm essentially looking for the most frequent combinations of any length with at least a pair. So my output for this would be:

unq   | frequency
1,2   | 2
1,3   | 2
1,5   | 1
2,3   | 1
2,5   | 2
2,7   | 1
1,2,3 | 1
1,2,5 | 1
2,5,7 | 1

(did this manually - so hopefully there are no errors) - the order of the paring doesn't matter. 2,5,7 = 5,2,7 = 7,5,2 etc.

Any thoughts? I am open to different tools. I have access to R, excel, sql server, mysql, etc.

Excel is preferred but not required!

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How many attributes are there and what is the range of values an attribute can take on? A naive algorithm might not scale, and I don't know if there is any tractable algorithm (but I am not an expert on that) –  frankc Jun 10 '11 at 15:33
    
Can you explain how you get from your dataset to your answer? I'm struggling to make sense of "most frequent combinations of any length with at least a pair". –  Richie Cotton Jun 10 '11 at 16:24
    
Got some better info. It can have 1 to 9 attributes. @Richie - Basically for Row D - here are all the unique combinations for that row (semicolon delimited): 1 2 5 1,2 1,5 2,5 1,2,5 So the only ones that qualify as "at least a pair" are 1,2 1,5 2,5 1,2,5 Does that help? Please feel free to ask again if it doesn't. I want to be clear in my answer. –  elgabito Jun 10 '11 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is a solution in R:

Recreate the data

x <- data.frame(
    id = letters[1:5],
    attr1 = c(2,3,2,1,2),
    attr2 = c(5,1,NA,2,1),
    attr3 = c(7,NA,NA,5,3))
x

  id attr1 attr2 attr3
1  a     2     5     7
2  b     3     1    NA
3  c     2    NA    NA
4  d     1     2     5
5  e     2     1     3

Create a function to list all the combinations

make_combinations <- function(data, size){
  t1 <- apply(data[, -1], 1, function(data)unname(sort(data)))
  t2 <- lapply(t1, function(xt){if(length(xt)>=size){combn(xt, size)}})
  t3 <- sapply(t2[!is.na(t2)], 
      function(chunk){if(!is.null(chunk))apply(chunk, 2, function(x)paste(x, collapse=","))})
  t4 <- unlist(t3)
  t4
}

Create a second function to count the combinations

count_combinations <- function(data, nn=2:3){
  tmp <- unlist(lapply(nn, function(n)make_combinations(data, n)))
  sort(table(tmp), decreasing=TRUE)
}  

The results:

count_combinations(x, 2:3)


  1,2   1,3   2,5 1,2,3 1,2,5   1,5   2,3 2,5,7   2,7   5,7 
    2     2     2     1     1     1     1     1     1     1 
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I got Error in apply(x[, -1], 1, function(data) unname(sort(data))) : object 'x' not found I am VERY new to R so perhaps I did something wrong? –  elgabito Jun 10 '11 at 17:04
    
No, my mistake. I have edited the question. There still was an x lurking in the function that should have referred to data. Please try again. –  Andrie Jun 10 '11 at 17:12
1  
Yes, I'm sorry. But it's Friday night. I should have done real work, and I need to go spend some time with my other half. To reverse engineer, may I suggest you include print statements in the code to print t1, t2, t3 and t4. That should make it reasonably clear what's happening in the workings. –  Andrie Jun 10 '11 at 17:16
1  
Dude you rock - that totally worked. First time using R and I am impressed. IF you or anybody else could tell me how I could translate this output into a two column table, that would be awesome, but this is fantastic! –  elgabito Jun 10 '11 at 17:54
1  
Just in case anyone else comes along via search, I skipped the first part above, created the two functions (just copy/paste), imported my csv rawsku <- read.table("rawsku.csv",header=T,sep=","), made sure it looked right names(rawsku); head(rawsku) and then run rawsku_results <- count_combinations(rawsku,2:9) the 2:9 looks for groupings between 2 and 9, then write it out to csv: write.csv(rawsku_results,file="rawsku_results.csv") –  elgabito Jun 10 '11 at 18:20

Here's your data, without the id column.

dfr <- data.frame(
  attr1 = c(2,3,2,1,2), 
  attr2 = c(5,1,NA,2,1), 
  attr3 = c(7,NA,NA,5,3)
)

This retrieves all the combinations, but the output form takes a little bit of navigating.

lapply(
  seq_len(nrow(dfr)),              #loop over rows
  function(row) 
  {
    lapply(
      seq_along(dfr)[-1],          #loop over lengths of combination, -1 is to ignore singletons
      function(m) 
      {
        combn(dfr[row, ], m)
      }
    )
  }
)
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