Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From ss64.com: /I : Ignore any changes to the current environment.

What does that mean? If you could give examples of usage and what it effects or doesn't effect, that would be great (none provided on website and have google searched with no luck).

share|improve this question
    
Thanks everyone for your answers! They are all right but I had to pick one that was solid and to the point (with minimal reading =P). I gave everyone UPs however. –  Mechaflash Jun 10 '11 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you modified the current environment by defining a variable;

set foo=bar
start app.exe

App.exe would see %foo% as being "bar"

set foo=bar
start /i app.exe

App.exe would see %foo% as being undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
So then you're actually creating a NEW environment altogether ignoring any rules placed before the START command? –  Mechaflash Jun 10 '11 at 18:02
    
yeah... To add to it, you would change the default environment. By that, I mean you would create system variables. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jun 10 '11 at 18:04
    
setx would be one example? –  Mechaflash Jun 10 '11 at 19:19

/I means that The new environment will be the original environment passed to the cmd.exe and not the current environment. Any changes made to the environment variables, paths, will not reflect in the current START instance.

It Passes the Cmd.exe startup environment to the new Command Prompt window, and nothing else.

See this

share|improve this answer
    
all those which set for a cmd window by default, are set... Ones set by the user temporarily are not. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jun 10 '11 at 18:02

From running start /? on my W7 box:

The new environment will be the original environment passed to the cmd.exe and not the current environment.

So the environment variables given are the ones given to the instances of cmd that start is invoked from, rather than the current environment stored on the system.

Example:

> set lol=1
> echo %lol%
1
> cmd
> echo %lol%
1

Now if I were to invoke a batch file which ran echo %lol%, but using the /I switch for start - %lol would not be defined, because I have changed the original environment settings passed to my original cmd.exe.

Why would you use it? Well say you needed to change %PATH% temporarily but then invoke a script that perhaps relied on the original version. start /I would be ideal here because no matter what you set it to, the environment passed to the cmd started by start will be whatever it was before you started your first instance of cmd.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.