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Is there a way in C# to see if a string is Base 64 encoded other than just trying to convert it and see if there is an error? I have code code like this:

// Convert base64-encoded hash value into a byte array.
byte[] HashBytes = Convert.FromBase64String(Value);

I want to avoid the "Invalid character in a Base-64 string" exception that happens if the value is not valid base 64 string. I want to just check and return false instead of handling an exception because I expect that sometimes this value is not going to be a base 64 string. Is there some way to check before using the Convert.FromBase64String function?

Thanks!

Update:
Thanks for all of your answers. Here is an extension method you can all use so far it seems to make sure your string will pass Convert.FromBase64String without an exception. .NET seems to ignore all trailing and ending spaces when converting to base 64 so "1234" is valid and so is " 1234 "

public static bool IsBase64String(this string s)
{
    s = s.Trim();
    return (s.Length % 4 == 0) && Regex.IsMatch(s, @"^[a-zA-Z0-9\+/]*={0,3}$", RegexOptions.None);

}

For those wondering about performance of testing vs catching and exception, in most cases for this base 64 thing it is faster to check than to catch the exception until you reach a certain length. The smaller the length faster it is

In my very unscientific testing: For 10000 iterations for character length 100,000 - 110000 it was 2.7 times faster to test first.

For 1000 iterations for characters length 1 - 16 characters for total of 16,000 tests it was 10.9 times faster.

I am sure there is a point where it becomes better to test with the exception based method. I just don't know at what point that is.

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1  
It depends on how "thorough" you want the check to be. You can use some pre-validation using a regex as others have answered, but that isn't the only indicator. base64 encoding requires padding in some cases using the = sign. If the padding is wrong, it will give an error even though the input matches an expression. –  vcsjones Jun 10 '11 at 16:41

10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's pretty easy to recognize a Base64 string, as it will only be composed of characters 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '0'..'9', '+', '/' and it is often padded at the end with up to three '=', to make the length a multiple of 4. But instead of comparing these, you'd be better off ignoring the exception, if it occurs.

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1  
I think you are on the right track. I did some testing and it seems it is multiples of 4 instead of 3. –  Chris Mullins Jun 10 '11 at 17:24
    
Its length needs to be a multiple of 3, at the time of encoding, for successful encoding! Sorry about that... and yeah, you're right... The encoded string has a length which is a multiple of 4. Thats why we'd pad upto 3 '=' . –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jun 10 '11 at 17:27
3  
Marked Correct because you were first to mention the multiple thing. I updated my question with an implementation of the solution let me know if you see any problems with it. –  Chris Mullins Jun 10 '11 at 18:05

I know you said you didn't want to catch an exception. But, because catching an exception is more reliable, I will go ahead and post this answer.

public static bool IsBase64(this string base64String) {
     if(base64String.Replace(" ","").Length % 4 != 0) {
         return false;
     }

     try{
         Convert.FromBase64String(base64String);
         return true;
     }
     catch(Exception exception){
     // Handle the exception
     }
     return false;
}
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Why not just catch the exception, and return False?

This avoids additional overhead in the common case.

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1  
This is an unusual case I guess where I am going to use the value is more likely to not be base 64 so I would rather avoid the overhead of the exception. It is much faster to check before. I am trying to convert an old system I inherited from clear text passwords to hashed values. –  Chris Mullins Jun 10 '11 at 17:22
1  
Regular expressions are never faster than what Tyler is suggesting. –  Vincent Koeman Jun 10 '11 at 17:33
    
See the comment at the bottom of my post. I think depending upon the length of the strings you are working with it can be faster to test first, especially for small strings like hashed passwords. The string has to be a multiple of 4 to even get to the regex, and then regex on a small string is faster than on a very large string. –  Chris Mullins Jun 10 '11 at 18:25

The answer must depend on the usage of the string. There are many strings that may be "valid base64" according to the syntax suggested by several posters, but that may "correctly" decode, without exception, to junk. Example: the 8char string Portland is valid Base64. What is the point of stating that this is valid Base64? I guess that at some point you'd want to know that this string should or should not be Base64 decoded.

In my case, I have Oracle connection strings that may be in plain text like:

Data source=mydb/DBNAME;User Id=Roland;Password=.....`

or in base64 like

VXNlciBJZD1sa.....................................==

I just have to check for the presence of a semicolon, because that proves that it is NOT base64, which is of course faster than any above method.

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Agree, case specifics also impose certain additional fast checks. Just like plaintext connectionstring vs base64 encoded. –  Oybek Nov 24 '14 at 5:11

Just for the sake of completeness I want to provide some implementation. Generally speaking Regex is an expensive approach, especially if the string is large (which happens when transferring large files). The following approach tries the fastest ways of detection first.

public static class HelperExtensions {
    // Characters that are used in base64 strings.
    private static Char[] Base64Chars = new[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '+', '/' };
    /// <summary>
    /// Extension method to test whether the value is a base64 string
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">Value to test</param>
    /// <returns>Boolean value, true if the string is base64, otherwise false</returns>
    public static Boolean IsBase64String(this String value) {

        // The quickest test. If the value is null or is equal to 0 it is not base64
        // Base64 string's length is always divisible by four, i.e. 8, 16, 20 etc. 
        // If it is not you can return false. Quite effective
        // Further, if it meets the above criterias, then test for spaces.
        // If it contains spaces, it is not base64
        if (value == null || value.Length == 0 || value.Length % 4 != 0
            || value.Contains(' ') || value.Contains('\t') || value.Contains('\r') || value.Contains('\n'))
            return false;

        // 98% of all non base64 values are invalidated by this time.
        var index = value.Length - 1;

        // if there is padding step back
        if (value[index] == '=')
            index--;

        // if there are two padding chars step back a second time
        if (value[index] == '=')
            index--;

        // Now traverse over characters
        // You should note that I'm not creating any copy of the existing strings, 
        // assuming that they may be quite large
        for (var i = 0; i <= index; i++) 
            // If any of the character is not from the allowed list
            if (!Base64Chars.Contains(value[i]))
                // return false
                return false;

        // If we got here, then the value is a valid base64 string
        return true;
    }
}

EDIT

As suggested by Sam, you can also change the source code slightly. He provides a better performing approach for the last step of tests. The routine

    private static Boolean IsInvalid(char value) {
        var intValue = (Int32)value;

        // 1 - 9
        if (intValue >= 48 && intValue <= 57) 
            return false;

        // A - Z
        if (intValue >= 65 && intValue <= 90) 
            return false;

        // a - z
        if (intValue >= 97 && intValue <= 122) 
            return false;

        // + or /
        return intValue != 43 && intValue != 47;
    } 

can be used to replace if (!Base64Chars.Contains(value[i])) line with if (IsInvalid(value[i]))

The complete source code with enhancements from Sam will look like this (removed comments for clarity)

public static class HelperExtensions {
    public static Boolean IsBase64String(this String value) {
        if (value == null || value.Length == 0 || value.Length % 4 != 0
            || value.Contains(' ') || value.Contains('\t') || value.Contains('\r') || value.Contains('\n'))
            return false;
        var index = value.Length - 1;
        if (value[index] == '=')
            index--;
        if (value[index] == '=')
            index--;
        for (var i = 0; i <= index; i++)
            if (IsInvalid(value[i]))
                return false;
        return true;
    }
    // Make it private as there is the name makes no sense for an outside caller
    private static Boolean IsInvalid(char value) {
        var intValue = (Int32)value;
        if (intValue >= 48 && intValue <= 57)
            return false;
        if (intValue >= 65 && intValue <= 90)
            return false;
        if (intValue >= 97 && intValue <= 122)
            return false;
        return intValue != 43 && intValue != 47;
    }
}
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Pathachiever11, You solution returns true for any string that is 4 chars long so it would be incorrect.

I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul.

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Sure. Just make sure each character is within a-z, A-Z, 0-9, /, or +, and the string ends with ==. (At least, that's the most common Base64 implementation. You might find some implementations that use characters different from / or + for the last two characters.)

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Yes, since Base64 encodes binary data into ASCII strings using a limited set of characters, you can simply check it with this regular expression:

/^[A-Za-z0-9\=\+\/\s\n]+$/s

which will assure the string only contains A-Z, a-z, 0-9, '+', '/', '=', and whitespace.

share|improve this answer
    
That isn't always a sure fire way to tell. Base64 does some padding for you using the = character at the end. If that padding is invalid, it's not a correct base64 encoding, even though it matches your regex. You can demo this by finding a base 64 string with 1 or 2 = at the end, removing them, and trying to decode it. –  vcsjones Jun 10 '11 at 16:40
    
I believe the OP asked to trap for illegal characters, not if the str was legal Base64. If the latter, you are correct, though padding errors in Base64 are easier to trap using exceptions. –  Rob Raisch Jun 10 '11 at 16:42
    
Not true, at least the .Net version of base64 parser ignores padding completely. –  Jay Jun 10 '11 at 16:44

I would suggest creating a regex to do the job. You'll have to check for something like this: [a-zA-Z0-9+/=] You'll also have to check the length of the string. I'm not sure on this one, but i'm pretty sure if something gets trimmed (other than the padding "=") it would blow up.

Or better yet check out this stackoverflow question

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Knibb High football rules!

This should be relatively fast and accurate but I admit I didn't put it through a thorough test, just a few.

It avoids expensive exceptions, regex, and also avoids looping through a character set, instead using ascii ranges for validation.

public static bool IsBase64String(string s)
    {
        s = s.Trim();
        int mod4 = s.Length % 4;
        if(mod4!=0){
            return false;
        }
        int i=0;
        bool checkPadding = false;
        int paddingCount = 1;//only applies when the first is encountered.
        for(i=0;i<s.Length;i++){
            char c = s[i];
            if (checkPadding)
            {
                if (c != '=')
                {
                    return false;
                }
                paddingCount++;
                if (paddingCount > 3)
                {
                    return false;
                }
                continue;
            }
            if(c>='A' && c<='z' || c>='0' && c<='9'){
                continue;
            }
            switch(c){ 
              case '+':
              case '/':
                 continue;
              case '=': 
                 checkPadding = true;
                 continue;
            }
            return false;
        }
        //if here
        //, length was correct
        //, there were no invalid characters
        //, padding was correct
        return true;
    }
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