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Is there an easy way to convert a number (in my case an integer) to a comma separated nvarchar string?

For instance, if I had an int value of 1000000 stored in a field, how can I convert to an nvarchar string, with the output value of "1,000,000"?

I could easily write a function to do this but I wanted to be sure there wasn't an easier way involving a call to either CAST or CONVERT.

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Are you trying to go from 1000000 to 1,000,000? –  Abe Miessler Jun 10 '11 at 16:49
    
Yes, that is correct. –  RLH Jun 10 '11 at 18:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

The reason you aren't finding easy examples for how to do this in T-SQL is that it is generally considered bad practice to implement formatting logic in SQL code. RDBMS's simply are not designed for presentation. While it is possible to do some limited formatting, it is almost always better to let the application or user interface handle formatting of this type.

But if you must (and sometimes we must!) use T-SQL, cast your int to money and convert it to varchar, like this:

select convert(varchar,cast(1234567 as money),1)

If you don't want the trailing decimals, do this:

select replace(convert(varchar,cast(1234567 as money),1), '.00','')

Good luck!

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Yes, that second statement is what I am looking for. In the case of this statement, I am having to generate a table with a one particular column that has data at fixed positions. Some of that data is numeric and the primary user (ahem, my boss) wants the data formatted. Yes, I could iterate over the table in my C# app, however, I prefer to keep table data manipulation to a minimum when the data that is coming from SQL is for display only. Maybe that's considered "bad practice" but I prefer to keep my "data"bases as my primary source of "data". –  RLH Jun 10 '11 at 18:11
    
Well done body. Cheers –  Rikki Rockett Nov 26 '12 at 8:27
    
@RLH Formatting is a presentation concern. Addition of trailing zeros and commas aren't part of the data, but the certainly make it more human-friendly when displaying it in the presentation layer. –  jinglesthula Jan 23 '13 at 15:57

Quick & dirty for int to nnn,nnn...

declare @i int = 123456789
select replace(convert(varchar(128), cast(@i as money), 1), '.00', '')
>> 123,456,789
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Not sure it works in tsql, but some platforms have to_char():

test=#select to_char(131213211653.78, '9,999,999,999,999.99');
        to_char        
-----------------------
    131,213,211,653.78
test=# select to_char(131213211653.78, '9G999G999G999G999D99');
        to_char        
-----------------------
    131,213,211,653.78
test=# select to_char(485, 'RN');
     to_char     
-----------------
         CDLXXXV

As the example suggests, the format's length needs to match that of the number for best results, so you might want to wrap it in a function (e.g. number_format()) if needed.


Converting to money works too, as point out by the other repliers.

test=# select substring(cast(cast(131213211653.78 as money) as varchar) from 2);
     substring      
--------------------
 131,213,211,653.78
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You really shouldn't be doing that in SQL - you should be formatting it in the middleware instead. But I recognize that sometimes there is an edge case that requires one to do such a thing.

This looks like it might have your answer:

How do I format a number with commas in T-SQL?

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This should be a comment or not included at all in favor of marking it a duplicate –  jmorc Aug 21 '13 at 19:09

remove the commas with a replace and convert:

CONVERT(INT,REPLACE([varName],',',''))

where varName is the name of the variable that has numeric values in it with commas

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2  
This is the opposite of the answer I as originally looking for. I have a number and I want to convert it to a string, formatted with commas. –  RLH Sep 13 '12 at 13:13

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