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consider the following:

class X {
public:
    X(int i) { cout << "X(int i)" << endl; }
    X(const X& x) { cout << "X(const X& x)" << endl; }
};

void main() {
    X x1(1);
    X x2 = X(1);
    X x3 = (X)1;
}

running this code produces this output:

X(int i)
X(int i)
X(int i)

I thought that all of the above three statements are equivalent as the copy CTOR is never called. However, changing X's copy CTOR to be private:

class X {
public:
    X(int i) { cout << "X(int i)" << endl; }
private:
    X(const X& x) { cout << "X(const X& x)" << endl; }
};

Will fail to compile (In visual studio 2010) with this error:

cannot access private member declared in class 'X'

So it seems the copy CTOR is involved somehow though I don't quite understand how.

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted
X x1(1);
X x2 = X(1);
X x3 = (X)1;

The reason is that all of these are not exactly equivalent.

First one is direct-initialization, while the second and third is copy-initialization. For copy-initialization, copy-constructor must be public, or else compiler will give error.

Now the question is, if 2nd and 3rd requires the copy-ctor to be public,then why the following output:

X(int i)
X(int i)
X(int i)

This surely says that copy-ctor is never called which is true. Compiler just elided the call to copy-ctor. According to §8.5/14, in such cases, the compiler is permitted to eliminate the need to call copy-constructor. That is why you don't see copy-ctor being called.

A little inside : in the 2nd and 3rd case, first a temporary is created by calling X(int i), then this temporary was supposed to be passed to the copy-ctor to copy-initialize the object being declared. But the compiler optimizes away this step, eliding the call to copy-ctor.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks again... I have one more coming up :) – dankilman Jun 10 '11 at 17:08
    
It would be interesting if you added some information on what the actual differences of the second and third line are, and under what circumstances (According to 8.5/14 in such cases...) to the answer – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 10 '11 at 22:45

The X x2 = ... invokes the copy constructor (even if the compiler optimises it out later). Thus, it must still be accessible.

share|improve this answer
  1. This :

    X x3 = (X)1; is c-style cast from int into the object of type X

  2. This copying :

    X x2 = X(1);

is optimized away but the compiler still needs the access to the copy-constructor.

share|improve this answer

Ist object makes use of parrametrized constructor as you know it and all others are using copy constructor. i.e. why when you are makin it private access violation occurs. The others two objects are making use of copy constructor.

These are the way of using copy constructor.

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