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I am working on learning Android. From the documents I have read so far I can't figure out how to get the splash View to show (during the sleep the screen stays blank). It appears I need to start a new activity for the main layout, but this seems wasteful (the splash should be forever gone, I'd like to reuse its thread).

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.util.Log;

public class Ext3 extends Activity {

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.splash);

        Log.v("Ext3", "starting to sleep");

        try {
            Thread.sleep (5000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        Log.v("Ext3", "done sleeping");

        setContentView (R.layout.main);
    }

}
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

I believe your splash screen never gets shown because you never give the UI thread (that you are in) a chance to draw it since you just sleep there doing nothing.

Instead of the Thread.sleep, I would suggest you look into a Timer or something like that to schedule the refresh and changing the content of your view; an alternative would be to start an AsyncTask where you could sleep before changing the view as you are doing now.

Do not sleep or in any other way block the UI thread, that's bad... (causes ANR)

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1  
See anddev.org/simple_splash_screen-t811.html for examples of how to accomplish this. – levis501 Jun 10 '11 at 17:03
    
So apparently my conviction that between calling the function and it returning its work gets done, is wrong. This seriously calls the machine model I had in question. Apparently the thread does more than my code. What and when are these actions? – kasterma Jun 10 '11 at 19:09
1  
@kasterma - This is described under Activity Lifecycle in the Activity docs and in Managing the Activity Lifecycle section of the Activities guide. – Ted Hopp Jun 10 '11 at 19:17
    
So in the UI thread the work is done by other code, my code just "sets some variables" to the right values. I had read the Activity Lifecycle, but not understood the import. – kasterma Jun 11 '11 at 5:26
    
You are correct, the UI thread is the thread that does all the drawing, layout and so on... and part of it is to call your activity to setup all those components. If you block it (sleep or wait for something), then you are freezing your user interface and make your application unresponsive. – Matthieu Jun 11 '11 at 6:13

When you call sleep like that, you are blocking the UI thread. Instead, put the second call to setContentView in a Runnable, create a Handler, and use the Handler's postDelayed method to run the Runnable. Something like this:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.splash);
    Runnable endSplash = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            setContentView (R.layout.main);
        }
    }
    new Handler().postDelayed(endSplash, 5000L);
}
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment in the answer by @Matthieu , I would expect sleep in the UI thread to block any further interaction. But I already set the layout; with my mental model I should not be able to block anything anymore. – kasterma Jun 10 '11 at 19:15
1  
Setting the layout does not automatically cause the screen to be rendered. That is code within the framework that executes after onCreate returns. Since you weren't returning until you had changed the content view, the splash screen never had a chance. The entire UI for the app was stalled for the duration of the sleep. – Ted Hopp Jun 10 '11 at 19:20

I have tried this code in my application and its working perfectly.May be it will help you.

public class SplashScreen extends Activity {

    /**
     * The thread to process splash screen events
     */
    private Thread mSplashThread;

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        // Splash screen view
        setContentView(R.layout.splash);



        final SplashScreen sPlashScreen = this;

        // The thread to wait for splash screen events
        mSplashThread = new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    synchronized (this) {
                        // Wait given period of time or exit on touch
                        wait(5000);
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                }

                finish();

                // Run next activity
                Intent intent = new Intent();
                intent.setClass(sPlashScreen, MainActivity.class);
                startActivity(intent);
                stop();
            }
        };

        mSplashThread.start();

    }

    @Override
    public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu) {
        super.onCreateOptionsMenu(menu);
        return false;
    }

    /**
     * Processes splash screen touch events
     */
    @Override
    public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent evt) {
        if (evt.getAction() == MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN) {
            synchronized (mSplashThread) {
                mSplashThread.notifyAll();
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Starting a new activity surely is more work then starting a new thread. – kasterma Jun 11 '11 at 5:28
    
@kasterma - not necessarily. There's a lot to be said for that approach. It keeps the splash screen separate from the main activity, for one. The main problem with it is that the main purpose of a splash screen (in my view) is to do time-consuming initialization that would prevent the main view from showing up right away. Doing the initialization in a separate splash activity means having to then transfer the initialized data to the main activity. (As an aside, it's wrong to call the deprecated stop() method in the thread's run() method; I don't know why people do it.) – Ted Hopp Jun 12 '11 at 3:19

This is the snippet for a basic splash screen

public class Splash extends Activity {

//private ProgressDialog pd = null;
private final int SPLASH_DISPLAY_LENGTH = 3000; 

/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle icicle) {
    super.onCreate(icicle);
    setContentView(R.layout.splashscreen);
    //this.pd = ProgressDialog.show(this, "Initializing..", "Initializing Infraline...", true, false);

    /* New Handler to start the InfralineTabWidget-Activity
     * and close this Splash-Screen after some seconds.*/

    new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable(){
        @Override
        public void run() {
        /* Create an Intent that will start the InfralineTabWidget-Activity. */
            Intent mainIntent = new Intent(Splash.this,InfralineTabWidget.class);
            Splash.this.startActivity(mainIntent);
            Splash.this.finish();
        }
    }, SPLASH_DISPLAY_LENGTH);

}

}

And in your AndroidManifest.xml put

    <activity android:name=".Splash" android:theme="@android:style/Theme.NoTitleBar" android:configChanges="orientation|keyboardHidden">
        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />
            <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
        </intent-filter>
    </activity>

Hopefully this works for you :)

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