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Let's say I want to write a Sudoku solver with some representational abstraction using typeclasses. So I'd like to make a typeclass for the row and the matrix:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}

class Row r where
  (!) :: r -> Int -> Int

class Sudoku a where
  row :: (Row r) => Int -> a -> r

Obviously, I would add more, but just these functions are enough to get me in trouble. Now let's say I want to implement this with nested lists. Trying:

instance Row r => Sudoku [r] where
  row n s = s !! (n - 1)

lands me in hot water:

Couldn't match expected type `r1' against inferred type `r'
  `r1' is a rigid type variable bound by
       the type signature for `row' at 96b.hs:7:14
  `r' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the instance declaration at 96b.hs:12:13
In the expression: s !! (n - 1)
In the definition of `row': row n s = s !! (n - 1)
In the instance declaration for `Sudoku [r]'

A second stab with:

instance Row [Int] where
  r ! n = r !! (n - 1)

instance Sudoku [[Int]] where
  row n s = s !! (n - 1)

fares no better:

Couldn't match expected type `r' against inferred type `[Int]'
  `r' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the type signature for `row' at 96b.hs:8:14
In the expression: s !! (n - 1)
In the definition of `row': row n s = s !! (n - 1)
In the instance declaration for `Sudoku [[Int]]'

I appear to be missing something. What's the proper way of modelling a simple scenario like this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your Sudoku class does not indicate any relationship between a and r. It is currently saying that if you have a sudoku, you can get any type of row from it. Your instances only show how to get one specific type of row from a sudoku, so that doesn't meet the requirement that any row type should work.

There are two common ways to solve this. One way is to use type families to relate the row type to the sudoku type:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, FlexibleInstances #-}

class Sudoku a where
    type RowType a :: *
    row :: Int -> a -> RowType a

instance Row r => Sudoku [r] where
    type RowType [r] = r
    row n s = s !! (n - 1)

You can also obtain the same result by using functional dependencies. We then add the row type as an additional parameter to the Sudoku class, and indicate the relationship that the sudoku determines the row type by using a functional dependency | a -> r:

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses, FunctionalDependencies,
             FlexibleInstances #-}

class Row r where
  (!) :: r -> Int -> Int

instance Row [Int] where
  r ! n = r !! (n - 1)

class Sudoku a r | a -> r where
    row :: (Row r) => Int -> a -> r

instance Row r => Sudoku [r] r where
    row n s = s !! (n - 1)
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@hammar. Nice answer. Do you know if it's possible to specify class constraints on type families? In other words, to say that for Sudoku a, the RowType a must be an instance of Row ? –  Lambdageek Jun 10 '11 at 17:43
1  
@Lambdageek You could write row :: Row (RowType a) => Int -> a -> RowType a, IIRC –  FUZxxl Jun 10 '11 at 17:55
    
@hammar. Thank you this explanation is great. I understand how my second example (instance Sudoku [[Int]]) specifies a specific instance of Row and thus fails to meet the contract of the Sudoku typeclass. But I'm struggling to understand the problem with the first instance. To me, it says something like a Sudoku is a list of Rows, and the row function just pulls an index out of that list. Maybe the problem is that as an instance it doesn't say anything at all about the type of Row? –  Ara Vartanian Jun 10 '11 at 18:01
    
@Ara: Your class definition says that if I have a list of rows Row r => [r] for some row type r, I can get a Row r2 => r2 for any row type r2, as there is no dependency between them in the class definition. Your instance only shows how to get the same type of row, so it's less polymorphic than required. –  hammar Jun 10 '11 at 18:12
    
@FUZxxl: Correct, I was just figuring out how to do this. I don't suppose there's a way to have the constraint directly on the associated type? –  hammar Jun 10 '11 at 18:17

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