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I know this is simple PHP logic but it just won't work...

 $str = "dan";
 if(($str != "joe") 
   || ($str != "danielle")
   || ($str != "heather")
   || ($str != "laurie")
   || ($str != "dan")){         

 echo "<a href='/about/".$str.".php'>Get to know ".get_the_author_meta('first_name')." &rarr;</a>";
                  }

What am I doing wrong?

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5  
What do you expect to happen?Please,describe. –  lam3r4370 Jun 10 '11 at 19:15
    
What's going wrong? –  Damien Pirsy Jun 10 '11 at 19:15
    
Also,your variable is set to dan and you check if the variable isn't dan (or other) and echo something.I think that you expect to see the info ,outputed with echo but your variable is dan. –  lam3r4370 Jun 10 '11 at 19:18
2  
To be honest, it seems like you want == instead of != ... –  joakimdahlstrom Jun 10 '11 at 19:20
6  
Also you probably should be using in_array() here. –  mario Jun 10 '11 at 19:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I am not exactly sure what you want, but that logic always evaluate to true. You might mean to use AND (&&) instead of OR (||)

The furthest statement that is ever tested is ($str != "danielle") and there are only two possible outcomes as PHP enters the block as soon as a statement yields true.

This is the first:

$str = "dan";

$str != "joe" # true - enter block
$str != "danielle" #ignored
$str != "heather" #ignored
$str != "laurie" #ignored
$str != "dan" #ignored

This is the second:

$str = "joe";

$str != "joe" # false - continue evaluating
$str != "danielle" # true - enter block
$str != "heather" #ignored
$str != "laurie" #ignored
$str != "dan" #ignored

If the OR was changed to AND then it keeps evaluating until a false is returned:

$str = "dan";

$str != "joe" # true - keep evaluating
$str != "danielle" # true - keep evaluating
$str != "heather"  # true - keep evaluating
$str != "laurie" # true - keep evaluating
$str != "dan"  # false - do not enter block

The solution doesn't scale well though, you should keep an array of the exclude list and check against that do:

$str = "dan";
$exclude_list = array("joe","danielle","heather","laurie","dan")
if(!in_array($str, $exclude_list)){          
    echo " <a href='/about/".$str.".php'>Get to know ".get_the_author_meta('first_name')." &rarr;</a>";
}
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just curious, but wouldn't && mean that they all must be right? basically the full function will get the authors name and only do that for certain authors not named above... –  Greg Thompson Jun 10 '11 at 19:16
    
Yeah, so you want to return if the $str is not equal to "joe" and $str is not equal to "danielle" $str is not equal to "heather" etc. –  Gazler Jun 10 '11 at 19:18
7  
+1 for giving a good answer to a bad question :) –  NikiC Jun 10 '11 at 19:34
8  
@Gazler Congrats on the Reversal badge :-) –  Bridge Aug 16 '13 at 12:08
1  
@Gazler according to stackoverflow.com/questions/2473989/… in_array also scales O(n). Using array('key' => true); and !isset($exclude_list[$key]) scales O(1) or O(ln(n)). Great answer anyway! –  Christoph Aug 21 '13 at 9:20

Another approach is

$name = 'dan';
$names = array('joe', 'danielle', 'heather', 'laurie', 'dan');

if(in_array($name,$names)){  
    //the magic
}
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Welcome to boolean logic:

$str = 'dan'

$str != "joe" -> TRUE, dan is not joe
$str != "danielle" -> TRUE, danielle is not dan
$str != "heather") -> TRUE, heather is not dan
$str != "laurie" -> TRUE, laurie is not dan
$str != "dan" -> FALSE, dan is dan

Boolean logic truth tables look like this:

and:

TRUE && TRUE -> TRUE
TRUE && FALSE -> FALSE
FALSE && FALSE -> FALSE
FALSE && TRUE -> FALSE

or:

TRUE || TRUE -> TRUE
TRUE || FALSE -> TRUE
FALSE || TRUE -> TRUE
FALSE || FALSE -> FALSE

Your statement boiled down to:

TRUE || TRUE || TRUE || TRUE || FALSE -> TRUE
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try this

$str = "dan";

if($str == "joe" || $str == "daniella" || $str == "heather" || $str == "laurine" || $str == "dan"){ ... }
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Based on your comment in Glazer's answer, it looks like you want to enter the if block when $str is not one of the listed names.

In that case it would be more readable if you write it as

if( !( ($str == "joe") || ($str == "danielle") || ($str == "heather") || ($str == "laurie") || ($str == "dan") ) )

This actually reads as "if it's not one of these people..." to someone looking at your code. Which is equivalent to the slightly less obvious

if( ($str != "joe") && ($str != "danielle") && ($str != "heather") && ($str != "laurie") && ($str != "dan") )

The fact that they're equivalent is called DeMorgan's law in logic.

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