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How can I edit the following regex

/(?<=src=")(.*?)(?=")/ui

to get only the matches that ends to jpeg, png, gif like the one below?

!http://.+\.(?:jpe?g|png|gif)!Ui

Thank you

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please explain a bit more about what you are trying to accomplish –  dqhendricks Jun 10 '11 at 20:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
/(?<=src=")([^"]+\.(jpe?g|png|gif))(?=")/ui

Replace the .* in the middle ( it represents file name ) - so this will match only if file name ends with jpg, jpeg, png, gif

EDIT:

Solutin with query string is :

/(?<=src=")([^"]+\.(jpe?g|png|gif))(\?[^"]*)?(?=")/ui

And i replaced . with [^"], because double quote is invalid in URI ( and not used often ) - or you can use this ([^"]|(?<=\)|") for escaped double quote

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Is there any solution for this type of url ? www.domain.com/media/k2/items/cache/98fa1e7f44a7213e727a7cb29f736fdb_L.jpg?time‌​stamp=1307719333 The code I posted, gets those images. –  Xalloumokkelos Jun 10 '11 at 20:27
    
see edit :-) small update –  SergeS Jun 10 '11 at 20:30
    
Thanks for the update! –  Xalloumokkelos Jun 10 '11 at 20:48

And in place of the catch-all (.*?) use ([^"]+) preferrably.

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Can you please explain me the difference ? –  Xalloumokkelos Jun 10 '11 at 20:30
    
The catch-all matches everything, and might accidently eat up two image strings in a single line. The second is a negated character class and only matches everything but double quotes - which is what you need since the searched string must always be enclosed in double quotes for your case anyway. -- Well see what SergeS updated now, that's exactly how it should read. –  mario Jun 10 '11 at 20:32
    
Thank you for the info! –  Xalloumokkelos Jun 10 '11 at 20:48

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