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I have a class with a enum DoStuff with values before, after, or none. These names are not the true names, but it gets the point across. The class has a method foo.

What follows is a set of readonly properties, of different types, each of which looks as follows:

public [type] MyProperty {
    get {
        if(enumValue == DoStuff.Before)
            foo();

        [type] result = //Do calculations here

        if(enumValue == DoStuff.After)
            foo();

        return result;
    }
}

Is there a way of abstracting these pre/post-calculation calls out? I can currently think of two solutions:

  • Create a private method that takes a delegate, and calls foo in the appropriate place. Complicated by the lack of generics on the platform I'm writing this for.

  • Make an uninstantiable base class with neither wrapper call, and derive a Before and After subclass that accesses the base class' properties, with the call in the appropriate place

Is there a well known pattern for this kind of structure?

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2  
As a general comment on style, I would avoid altering the state within a property getter except for initialization purposes. –  Reddog Jun 10 '11 at 20:37
1  
Infinite recursion! –  Dan Tao Jun 10 '11 at 20:38
    
@Dan Tao: Oops. My bad. –  Eric Jun 10 '11 at 20:42
    
@Reddog: foo() is not a state-altering call. –  Eric Jun 10 '11 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Create a method with this syntax:

delegate void Handler();

void DoHandler(Handler handler)
{
        if(enumValue == DoStuff.Before)
            foo();

        handler();

        if(enumValue == DoStuff.After)
            foo();
}

Then in your property

public [type] MyProperty 
{
    get 
    {
        [type] result = default(type); 
        DoHandler(() => 
        {
            int a = 5;
            int b = 6;
            result = a + b;
        });
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Two problems with that. Firstly, that requires me to write a DoHandler function for each type of return value, which makes the code messier, not cleaner. Secondly, I said in the question that I have no generics support, so no Func<type>. –  Eric Jun 11 '11 at 19:45
    
well, you can do it slightly different then. I'll modify it then. –  Chuck Savage Jun 11 '11 at 20:19
    
Can you do closures within lambdas in c#? –  Eric Jun 11 '11 at 21:27
    
Closures as in { }? A lambda is a short-hand function, so whatever you can do with functions you can do with lambda's (and more with lambda's, as you can see it assigns to a variable outside the function scope). Modified lambda some so maybe it may help you. –  Chuck Savage Jun 12 '11 at 0:27

I'd be inclined to create a Before and After event/delegate and slap foo() in the appropriate place, probably wherever you're setting enumValue right now. Then call:

get {
   BeforeDelegate();
   // Do calcs
   AfterDelegate();
}

What's the practical use? Why do you need this pattern?

Sidenote: If I have a getter doing that kind of logic I'm more likely to put it in a method. It's less likely to surprise folks. Methods insinuate that I probably did something under the hood to get the value you asked for beyond just exposing a scalar value.

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The code is to interface with a piece of hardware, so it seems reasonable to use properties (since they are properties of the hardware). The hardware has three modes: update continuously (Continuous, aka DoStuff.None), update when requested (Standby, aka DoStuff.Before), and update after read (Query, aka DoStuff.After). –  Eric Jun 10 '11 at 20:41
    
Hmmm... I'd still be more comfortable with a GetPropertyValue() call but it's a nitpicky thing to begin with. Is there anything other than foo() that happens in the decision points? I don't think this is a "best pattern" question so much as a "concise semantics" thing. If that's all that happens and this is the only property where it happens, then the enum approach is pretty clear. If this happens all over the place then I'd be inclined to go with the delegate/event approach. –  Pete M Jun 10 '11 at 22:20

I think its better to put enum value in a seperate class that has 1 property named EnamumValue and to event BEfore and After,and handle this to event in the class that uses enamvalue class, when enumvalue changes fire appropriate Event

public class EnumValueClass
{

    public event BeforeDelegate OnBefore();
    public event AfterDelegate OnAfter();
    private EnumType enumValue;
    public EnumType EnumValue
    {
        get {
            return enumValue;
        }
        set{
            this.enumValue = value;
            if(enumValue == DoStuff.Before)
                if(OnBefore!=null)
                    OnBefore();

            if(enumValue == DoStuff.After)
                if(OnAfter!=null)
                    OnAfter();
        }


    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't fit the contract of the call. Firstly, OnAfter is the same function as OnBefore. More importantly though, the method foo must be called either before or after most property accesses. It does not need to be called when the mode is changed. –  Eric Jun 11 '11 at 7:58

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