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Can someone pelase explain to me how I can avoid the error below?

I think I am following all I have read on template compilation but still get an error. Sorry for asking this - it seems trivial but I am stuck!

Thanks, Paolo

1>------ Build started: Project: BitsAndPieces, Configuration: Release Win32 ------
1>  NonTemplateFunctionFriend_main.cpp
1>NonTemplateFunctionFriend_main.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: int __thiscall Paolo<int>::getMyOnlyMember(void)" (?getMyOnlyMember@?$Paolo@H@@QAEHXZ)
1>\\na-13\agnolucp\my documents\visual studio 2010\Projects\BitsAndPieces\Release\BitsAndPieces.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 1 unresolved externals
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

main

#include "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.h"
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;


int main() { 
    Paolo<int> Me;
    cout << Me.getMyOnlyMember() << endl;
    return 1;
}

NonTemplateFunctionFriend.h

#ifndef NonTemplateFunctionFriend_H
#define NonTemplateFunctionFriend_H

    #include <iostream>

    template<class T> class Paolo {

    private:
        T myOnlyMember;
    public:
        Paolo(): myOnlyMember(1000) {};
        T getMyOnlyMember();
    };

    #include "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp"

#endif

NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp

#ifndef NonTemplateFunctionFriend_CPP
#define NonTemplateFunctionFriend_CPP

    #include "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.h"

    template<class T>   T getMyOnlyMember() {
            return myOnlyMember;
    }


#endif
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Please format your error message as a code sample –  Chris Frederick Jun 10 '11 at 22:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can separate the file as long as you're including it inside the header file (templates must be fully defined within the same translation unit, lacking proper support for the export keyword).

But you're not qualifying your function definition with the class

Paolo<T>::
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@ user793449 - thanks you were right! –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 22:13
#ifndef NonTemplateFunctionFriend_H
#define NonTemplateFunctionFriend_H

    #include <iostream>

    template<class T> class Paolo {

    private:
        T myOnlyMember;
    public:
        Paolo(): myOnlyMember(1000) {};
        T getMyOnlyMember();
    };

   template<class T>
   T Paolo<T>::getMyOnlyMember() {
            return myOnlyMember;
    }


#endif
share|improve this answer
    
@RTS - I was aware taht it would work this way but I woudl liek to put them in different files (as above) so as to learn how to organize my code –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 21:56
1  
@Paolo Rossi With templates good form says that you should have your function definition in the same file as the declaration. This is one of the few exceptions to the rule about keeping declaration separate from definition. This is due to the compiler and the C++ standard requiring that each templates definition be available in every compilation unit(generally a file) that the template is used in. –  Skyler Saleh Jun 10 '11 at 21:59
    
@Paolo Rossi: You actually cannot compile that as it is an abstract definition lacking at least the size of the T datastructure –  mbx Jun 10 '11 at 22:00
    
@RTS - Hi again, I appreciate that but the book I am studying off talks about inclusion compilation model which implies structuring the code as I did above, although without getting errors I guess!! Thansk anyway –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 22:01
    
@Paolo Does it contain any samples of separating declaration of a template and its definition? BTW is it mentioning the export keyword? :-) –  mbx Jun 10 '11 at 22:13

Template code must be defined before use, not just declared.

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hello by #including "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.h" which then #including "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp" am I not defining the template?? –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 21:53
    
If it would be compilable, it could be linked to. Thus the definition won't be needed at compile time. And yes, it's hypothetical. –  mbx Jun 10 '11 at 22:02
    
Paolo the compiler will generate the code for the templates based on the instantiations using the template usually found elsewhere in your code. –  AJG85 Jun 10 '11 at 22:44

You defined a free function in NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp, not a member function of Paolo<T>:

    template<class T>   T Paolo<T>::getMyOnlyMember() {
            return myOnlyMember;
    }

That is, you missed the Paolo<T>:: in the definition.

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That is definitely true - thnaks, but I copied the code you wrote and still get thw same error message –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 22:10
    
I got rid of return 1 in the main, re-run the code and it worked. Is there an explanation for this? –  Paolo Rossi Jun 10 '11 at 22:12
    
return 0 to terminate normally ... non zero returns from main can be used to signal abnormal termination. –  AJG85 Jun 10 '11 at 22:37

Paolo: Your code doesn't link because your code does not define the member function `Paulo::getMyOnlyMember. You do have a definition in NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp that looks somewhat like what you want, but to the compiler it is a completely different function template.

That said, never do this in a header:

#include "NonTemplateFunctionFriend.cpp"

Never do this in a header, either:

template<class T>
T Paolo<T>::getMyOnlyMember() {
    return myOnlyMember;
}

The problem here is that if multiple files include the header and create a getMyOnlyMember for the same type you will have an unhappy linker. Add the inline qualifier and everything will be cool.

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