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Hi I'm creating a new audio tag element in Javascript this is the code:

var audio = document.createElement("audio");
audio.setAttribute("id","myid");
audio.setAttribute("autoplay","autoplay");
document.body.appendChild(audio);

before appending it to the body, I'd like to place an onended event handler, I tried something like this:

audio.onended = foo;

where foo is something like: function foo(){alert('Hola')}

and

audio.setAttribute("onended","foo()");

in both case it didn't work. In the first case the audio tag is appended without any onended event handler; while in the second case the audio tag is appended, the onended event is on the attributes but it does not fire.

does someone have any idea?

thanks in advance.

-z-

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3 Answers 3

up vote 48 down vote accepted

try:

audio.addEventListener('ended', foo);

This is the correct and standard method to add event listeners.

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You are right, thanks a lot.. –  Zeta Jun 11 '11 at 7:54
2  
Before I stumbled upon this answer, I tried, $(audio).bind('onended'). Not suprisingly, it did not work. Yours does, and so did $(audio).bind('ended'). Can't decide which I like better... in jquery-depended code. –  KateYoak Jun 7 '12 at 20:43
1  
In jQuery dependent code where all your bindings are made through jQuery there is no reason to make an exception when it comes to audio elements. –  Variant Jul 15 '12 at 8:36
1  
Works. But I'm pretty sure it's inaccurate to say, "This is the correct and standard method to add event listeners." Directly assigning event listeners is still a supported mechanism for pretty much every other tag. That it doesn't work on the audio tag for this particular event is a bit of an anomaly. –  svidgen Nov 18 '13 at 22:21
    
Directly assigning events (The traditional model) works for most events but certainly not for all and surely not for custom events. Also you can only assign one event handler and not append and remove multiple listeners. the standard (w3c) way is by using addEventListener. Read more here quirksmode.org/js/events_advanced.html –  Variant Nov 19 '13 at 8:58

First, make sure whether audio element has the event before you use it, suppose the HTMLAudioElement is audio, you can test it like this audio.hasOwnProperty('onended')

Based on my browser, it doesn't support.

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I found this very helpful jsfiddle from Google: http://jsfiddle.net/aarongloege/fzXsT/light/

{Code on /*jsFiddle*/}
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