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Ok, this is an odd one: (This is EXTREMELY cut down example code. Please don't get uppity about the lack of destructors or whatever)

template <class f, class g> class Ptr;

class RealBase
{
};

template <class a, class b, class c = Ptr<a,b> >
class Base : public RealBase
{
public:
    Base(){};
};

template <class d, class e>
class Derived : public Base <d,e>
{
public:
    Derived(){};
    void DerivedMethod(){};
};
typedef Derived<double,double> D_Derived;

template <class f, class g>
class Ptr
{
public:
    Ptr(){};
    Ptr(Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >* a){in = a;};
    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >* operator->()
    {
	    return in;
    };

    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >& operator*()
    {
	    return *in;
    };
private:
    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >* in;
};

I'm using the Ptr class from this example in a vector, as a pointer to a Derived class.

As we can see, the Ptr takes a Base<>* as it's constructor argument.

Unfortunately I need a constructor that takes a const Base<>*, and I cannot simply do this:

Ptr(const Base<>* a) { in = const_cast<Base<>*>(a)};
Any ideas how I can make this class accept a const Base<>* as it's constructor?

(N.B. I may be being dozy here and doing something dumb, so please forgive me if it's really obvious, I've been on a computer for faaar to long today)

EDIT

Come on guys, comment on why for a down vote

EDIT2 Quick syntax edit (used variable names from the real code instead of the example code)

EDIT

Ok, turns out I can fix this by making changes to unrelated code, so it's a bit of a non-problem now =] Took me about a day to fix it though =[

share|improve this question
1  
You lost me at "don't get uppity or whatever". –  Drew Dormann Mar 11 '09 at 4:17
    
My apologies. The last time I posted cut-down example code some guy kept going on about how I didn't have virtual destructors. –  Ed Woodcock Mar 11 '09 at 11:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you need to define a separate class to wrap pointers to const, since not only the arguments of the constructor, but also the return types of the operators should be changed to const versions. If you make the ConstPtr a friend of Ptr, this should work out quite nicely:

template<...>
class ConstPtr {
  const Base<...> *in;
  ConstPtr(Base<...>* a) { in = a; }
  ConstPtr(const Base<...>* a) { in = a; }
  ConstPtr(const Ptr<...> &a) { in = a.in; }
  ...
};

To construct wrappers from raw pointers you could add an overloaded function, more or less like this:

template<..., class P>
P make_ptr(Base<...> *t);

template<...>
Ptr<...> make_ptr< ..., Ptr<...> >(Base<...> *t) {
  return Ptr(t);
}

template<...>
ConstPtr<...> make_ptr< ..., ConstPtr<...> >(const Base<...> *t) {
  return ConstPtr(t)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Any chance of being a little more verbose on the friend syntax? It's not working as I expected and I'd like to see what you actually had in mind! –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 17:58
    
My plan was to put "friend ConstPtr<...>;" in the definition of "Ptr<...>", to let the constructor of ConstPtr access "a.in". I haven't tested it though and maybe there are some complications due to the templates. –  sth Mar 10 '09 at 18:15
    
Ok, that's what I did. Is there any way to throw it into a ConstPtr automatically? It's not an option to have distinct classes for the two opti –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 18:19
    
options* (Javascript is REALLY screwy on linux sometimes) –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 18:19
    
Edited and added a "factory function". But in the end, you won't get a simple Ptr<a,b> out of the poniter to const, you will be stuck with two different types one way or another. After all, the const and the non-const version are two different things. –  sth Mar 10 '09 at 19:24

according your example you should do

Ptr( const Base< f,g, Ptr< f, g > >* a )
{
   in = const_cast< Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >* > ( a );
}

ps: I don't like const_cast and in similar cases I try to avoid this. Maybe need do two implementation of Ptr for const and non const arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
"Invalid use of const_cast with type ‘Ptr<double, double>’, which is not a pointer, reference, nor a pointer-to-data-member type." I already said this was not a option. –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 17:19
    
I don't know why you can't compile my sample. I tested this on my msvc 2005 compiler - all ok. Please provide most detailed information about your problem. –  bayda Mar 10 '09 at 17:41
    
I understand that the code SHOULD compile. However, for completely unknown and probably incredibly complex reasons it doesn't, as I said in the question. I'll remove the -1 but you should really read the question before answering. –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 18:23
    
Sorry, I really read your question, it had misspelling errors, I fixed it and compiled, all worked. If it not compiles now, could you send me comlette code file? I will have chance to find problem. –  bayda Mar 10 '09 at 18:54

Your Ptr class has a non-const pointer member. You will not be able to assign a const Base* without some unsafe casts. Do you want that? Try this instead:

template <class f, class g>
class Ptr
{
   public:
    Ptr(){};
    Ptr(Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> > const* a) { in = *a; }
    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >* operator->()
    {
        return &in;
    };

    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> >& operator*()
    {
        return in;
    };

private:
    Base<f,g,Ptr<f,g> > in;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. Looks good, but if Base<f, g, Ptr<f, g> > has a member of type Ptr<f, g>, this will create an infinite-sized class. But I haven't figured out what the OP's trying to do so I'm not sure if that's likely to be the case... –  j_random_hacker Mar 10 '09 at 17:59
    
Sorry, that's not a feasible option: I have to keep a pointer to the original object in this case not the object itself in order to do things with the addresses later (it's not nice code). The full version of it is a Neural Network simulator, so it'd take about a week to explain the full situation! –  Ed Woodcock Mar 10 '09 at 18:13

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