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I want to convert a duration of time, i.e., number of seconds to colon-separated time string (hh:mm:ss)

I found some useful answers here but they all talk about converting to x hours and x minutes format.

So is there a tiny snippet that does this in jQuery or just raw JavaScript?

Thanks.

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8  
Benchmarks of a few of the suggested answers in this thread. jsperf.com/ms-to-hh-mm-ss-time-format –  Claudijo Jun 4 '13 at 9:19

25 Answers 25

up vote 225 down vote accepted
String.prototype.toHHMMSS = function () {
    var sec_num = parseInt(this, 10); // don't forget the second param
    var hours   = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600);
    var minutes = Math.floor((sec_num - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
    var seconds = sec_num - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);

    if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
    if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
    if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
    var time    = hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
    return time;
}

You can use it now like:

alert("5678".toHHMMSS());
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1  
Thanks for the prototype idea, I like how it is easier to call it. I prototyped the Number so I can call it on them too. I also found this answer that would remove the hours and minutes if they were not needed. –  alunsford3 May 25 '12 at 5:44
1  
wow, this is amazing! I hate dealing with time in javascript. –  simey.me Aug 16 '13 at 21:05
3  
use "%" operator >> var minutes = Math.floor((sec_num % 3600) / 60); var seconds = Math.floor(sec_num % 60); –  Ivan Malyshev Mar 31 '14 at 12:50
1  
awesome idea! just curious why string and not Number prototype? since seconds are usually an int and would need to be converted toString. This works for me ((date2 - date1) / 1000).secondsToTimespan() –  Sonic Soul Jun 26 at 16:47
1  
ah thanks. I don't see it working both ways as a string until you call .toString() on the integer. you can make it work the other way around by parsing int too –  Sonic Soul Jun 26 at 21:13

To get the time part in the format hh:MM:ss, you can use this regular expression:

var myDate = new Date().toTimeString().replace(/.*(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}).*/, "$1");

(This was mentioned above in same post by someone, thanks for that.)

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4  
+1 - Super-simple; thanks! Just used a variant of this to only show the minutes and seconds: var myDate = new Date().toTimeString().replace(/.*(\d{2}:\d{2})(:\d{2}).*/, "$1"); –  Topher Fangio May 17 '13 at 15:11
    
shouldn't that be "new Date(null, null, null, null, null, timeInSecs).toTimeString().replace(/.*(\d{2}:)(\d{2}:\d{2}).*/, "$2")" ? –  obie Aug 27 '13 at 15:36
    
Amazing! Thanks! –  Adrian P. Oct 14 '13 at 19:18
4  
The use of replace is confusing. Why not use new Date(null, null, null, null, null, timeInSeconds).toTimeString().match(/\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}/)[0] ? –  Călin Darie Jan 4 '14 at 19:17
2  
This is fine for showing a given time, but note the question (and other answers here) are about showing a duration, i.e. a given number of seconds independent of the current time. –  mahemoff Sep 29 '14 at 19:34

I recommend ordinary javascript, using the Date object:

var seconds = 9999;
// multiply by 1000 because Date() requires miliseconds
var date = new Date(seconds * 1000);
var hh = date.getUTCHours();
var mm = date.getUTCMinutes();
var ss = date.getSeconds();
// If you were building a timestamp instead of a duration, you would uncomment the following line to get 12-hour (not 24) time
// if (hh > 12) {hh = hh % 12;}
// These lines ensure you have two-digits
if (hh < 10) {hh = "0"+hh;}
if (mm < 10) {mm = "0"+mm;}
if (ss < 10) {ss = "0"+ss;}
// This formats your string to HH:MM:SS
var t = hh+":"+mm+":"+ss;
document.write(t);

(Of course, the Date object created will have an actual date associated with it, but that data is extraneous, so for these purposes, you don't have to worry about it.)

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to make the date in the local time zone, which in my case adds 1 hour to the time. With seconds=0, I get "01:00:00" (Thu Jan 01 1970 01:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET)), which is wrong. –  mivk Jun 7 '13 at 15:12
2  
I get a correct result if I use date.getUTCHours() and date.getUTCMinutes(). –  mivk Jun 7 '13 at 16:52
    
I don't understand why you're returning a 12 hour timestamp when he asked for a duration? –  Nathan C. Tresch Jan 26 at 21:02
    
@NathanC.Tresch thanks for the correction. See update above. –  JellicleCat Jan 26 at 22:52
    
@JellicleCat Changed to a +1, and nice name. –  Nathan C. Tresch Jan 26 at 23:36

A Google search turned up this result:

function secondsToTime(secs)
{
    secs = Math.round(secs);
    var hours = Math.floor(secs / (60 * 60));

    var divisor_for_minutes = secs % (60 * 60);
    var minutes = Math.floor(divisor_for_minutes / 60);

    var divisor_for_seconds = divisor_for_minutes % 60;
    var seconds = Math.ceil(divisor_for_seconds);

    var obj = {
        "h": hours,
        "m": minutes,
        "s": seconds
    };
    return obj;
}
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4  
secondsToTime(119.9) => Object {h: 0, m: 1, s: 60}. To fix this, add secs = Math.round(secs); at the beginning of the method. Of course, we saw this bug during the demo... –  pinouchon Nov 18 '13 at 11:15

Variation on a theme. Handles single digit seconds a little differently

seconds2time(0)  ->  "0s" 
seconds2time(59) -> "59s" 
seconds2time(60) -> "1:00" 
seconds2time(1000) -> "16:40" 
seconds2time(4000) -> "1:06:40"

function seconds2time (seconds) {
    var hours   = Math.floor(seconds / 3600);
    var minutes = Math.floor((seconds - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
    var seconds = seconds - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);
    var time = "";

    if (hours != 0) {
      time = hours+":";
    }
    if (minutes != 0 || time !== "") {
      minutes = (minutes < 10 && time !== "") ? "0"+minutes : String(minutes);
      time += minutes+":";
    }
    if (time === "") {
      time = seconds+"s";
    }
    else {
      time += (seconds < 10) ? "0"+seconds : String(seconds);
    }
    return time;
}
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Thanks for saving me an hour on this –  starsinmypockets Oct 18 '13 at 18:10

I like the first answer. Some optimizations for him:

  • source data is a number, there is no need to recalculate.
  • much excess computing

Result code:

Number.prototype.toHHMMSS = function () {
    var seconds = Math.floor(this),
        hours = Math.floor(seconds / 3600);
    seconds -= hours*3600;
    var minutes = Math.floor(seconds / 60);
    seconds -= minutes*60;

    if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
    if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
    if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
    return hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
}
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1  
I think this function is a feature used in the fronted and therefor I prototype String and not Number. And Number can always be a string but not the other way round. –  powtac Nov 13 '12 at 20:43
1  
I think Number is right because seconds is, in fact, a number. you should convert from string before using this function, which is the right thing to do! –  caesarsol Dec 3 '13 at 9:55

You can manage to do this without any external JS library with the help of JS Date method like following:

    var date = new Date(null);
    date.setSeconds(SECONDS); // specify value for SECONDS here
    date.toISOString().substr(11, 8);
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3  
Why is this answer with so low? I get it in 2011 probably IE 7 and 8 was the base which will not support it, but it's end of 2014, so this simple plain, fuss free solution should be way higher. –  Emil Borconi Dec 10 '14 at 13:27
    
From MDN: If a parameter you specify is outside of the expected range, setSeconds() attempts to update the date information in the Date object accordingly. For example, if you use 100 for secondsValue, the minutes stored in the Date object will be incremented by 1, and 40 will be used for seconds. So yeah, looks good! –  Andrew Feb 9 at 3:50

using the amazing moment.js library

function humanizeDuration(input, units ) { 
  // units is a string with possible values of y, M, w, d, h, m, s, ms
  var duration = moment().startOf('day').add(units, input),
    format = "";

  if(duration.hour() > 0){ format += "H [hours] "; }

  if(duration.minute() > 0){ format += "m [minutes] "; }

  format += " s [seconds]";

  return duration.format(format);
}

This allows you to specify any duration be it hours, minutes, seconds , mills, and returns a human readable version

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new Date().toString().split(" ")[4];

result 15:08:03

share|improve this answer
    
Nice - thanks! And a small improvement I made for my needs was to convert a duration in milliseconds to HH:MM:SS -- new Date(new Date().getTime() - startTime).toUTCString().split(" ")[4] where startTime was set previously using startTime = new Date().getTime();. (I had to use toUTCString() because otherwise the times were an hour out.) –  Richard Wiseman Mar 17 at 10:06
s2t=function (t){
  return parseInt(t/86400)+'d '+(new Date(t%86400*1000)).toUTCString().replace(/.*(\d{2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2}).*/, "$1h $2m $3s");
}

s2t(123456);

result:

1d 10h 17m 36s
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A regular expression can be used to match the time substring in the string returned from the toString() method of the Date object, which is formatted as follows: "Thu Jul 05 2012 02:45:12 GMT+0100 (GMT Daylight Time)". Note that this solution uses the time since the epoch: midnight of January 1, 1970. This solution can be a one-liner, though splitting it up makes it much easier to understand.

function secondsToTime(seconds) {
    var start = new Date(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0).getTime();
    var end = new Date(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, parseInt(seconds), 0).getTime();
    var duration = end - start;

    return new Date(duration).toString().replace(/.*(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}).*/, "$1");
}
share|improve this answer

Here is yet another version, which handles days also:

function FormatSecondsAsDurationString( seconds )
{
    var s = "";

    var days = Math.floor( ( seconds / 3600 ) / 24 );
    if ( days >= 1 )
    {
        s += days.toString() + " day" + ( ( days == 1 ) ? "" : "s" ) + " + ";
        seconds -= days * 24 * 3600;
    }

    var hours = Math.floor( seconds / 3600 );
    s += GetPaddedIntString( hours.toString(), 2 ) + ":";
    seconds -= hours * 3600;

    var minutes = Math.floor( seconds / 60 );
    s += GetPaddedIntString( minutes.toString(), 2 ) + ":";
    seconds -= minutes * 60;

    s += GetPaddedIntString( Math.floor( seconds ).toString(), 2 );

    return s;
}

function GetPaddedIntString( n, numDigits )
{
    var nPadded = n;
    for ( ; nPadded.length < numDigits ; )
    {
        nPadded = "0" + nPadded;
    }

    return nPadded;
}
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I think performance wise this is by far the fastest:

var t = 34236; // your seconds
var time = ('0'+Math.floor(t/3600) % 24).slice(-2)+':'+('0'+Math.floor(t/60)%60).slice(-2)+':'+('0' + t % 60).slice(-2)
//would output: 09:30:36
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Here's how I did it. It seems to work fairly well, and it's extremely compact. (It uses a lot of ternary operators, though)

function formatTime(seconds) {
  var hh = Math.floor(seconds / 3600),
    mm = Math.floor(seconds / 60) % 60,
    ss = Math.floor(seconds) % 60;
  return (hh ? (hh < 10 ? "0" : "") + hh + ":" : "") + ((mm < 10) && hh ? "0" : "") + mm + ":" + (ss < 10 ? "0" : "") + ss
}

...and for formatting strings...

String.prototype.toHHMMSS = function() {
  formatTime(parseInt(this, 10))
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, thanks Rookie! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Mar 26 '14 at 20:15
function toHHMMSS(seconds) {
    var h, m, s, result='';
    // HOURs
    h = Math.floor(seconds/3600);
    seconds -= h*3600;
    if(h){
        result = h<10 ? '0'+h+':' : h+':';
    }
    // MINUTEs
    m = Math.floor(seconds/60);
    seconds -= m*60;
    result += m<10 ? '0'+m+':' : m+':';
    // SECONDs
    s=seconds%60;
    result += s<10 ? '0'+s : s;
    return result;
}

Examples

    toHHMMSS(111); 
    "01:51"

    toHHMMSS(4444);
    "01:14:04"

    toHHMMSS(33);
    "00:33"
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Non-prototype version of toHHMMSS:

    function toHHMMSS(seconds) {
        var sec_num = parseInt(seconds);
        var hours   = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600);
        var minutes = Math.floor((sec_num - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
        var seconds = sec_num - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);        
        if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
        if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
        if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
        var time    = hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
        return time;
    }   
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I loved Powtac's answer, but I wanted to use it in Angular, so I created a filter using his code.

.filter('HHMMSS', ['$filter', function ($filter) {
    return function (input, decimals) {
        var sec_num = parseInt(input, 10),
            decimal = parseFloat(input) - sec_num,
            hours   = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600),
            minutes = Math.floor((sec_num - (hours * 3600)) / 60),
            seconds = sec_num - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);

        if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
        if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
        if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
        var time    = hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
        if (decimals > 0) {
            time += '.' + $filter('number')(decimal, decimals).substr(2);
        }
        return time;
    };
}])

It's functionally identical, except that I added in an optional decimals field to display fractional seconds. Use it like you would any other filter:

{{ elapsedTime | HHMMSS }} displays: 01:23:45

{{ elapsedTime | HHMMSS : 3 }} displays: 01:23:45.678

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This is how i did it

function timeFromSecs(seconds)
{
    return(
    Math.floor(seconds/86400)+'d :'+
    Math.floor(((seconds/86400)%1)*24)+'h : '+
    Math.floor(((seconds/3600)%1)*60)+'m : '+
    Math.round(((seconds/60)%1)*60)+'s');
}

timeFromSecs(22341938) will return '258d 14h 5m 38s'

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I'd upvote artem's answer, but I am a new poster. I did expand on his solution, though not what the OP asked for as follows

    t=(new Date()).toString().split(" ");
    timestring = (t[2]+t[1]+' <b>'+t[4]+'</b> '+t[6][1]+t[7][0]+t[8][0]);

To get

04Oct 16:31:28 PDT

This works for me...

But if you are starting with just a time quantity, I use two functions; one to format and pad, and one to calculate:

function sec2hms(timect){

  if(timect=== undefined||timect==0||timect === null){return ''};
  //timect is seconds, NOT milliseconds
  var se=timect % 60; //the remainder after div by 60
  timect = Math.floor(timect/60);
  var mi=timect % 60; //the remainder after div by 60
  timect = Math.floor(timect/60);
  var hr = timect % 24; //the remainder after div by 24
  var dy = Math.floor(timect/24);
  return padify (se, mi, hr, dy);
}

function padify (se, mi, hr, dy){
  hr = hr<10?"0"+hr:hr;
  mi = mi<10?"0"+mi:mi;
  se = se<10?"0"+se:se;
  dy = dy>0?dy+"d ":"";
  return dy+hr+":"+mi+":"+se;
}
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If you know the number of seconds you have, this will work. It also uses the native Date() object.

function formattime(numberofseconds){    
    var zero = '0', hours, minutes, seconds, time;

    time = new Date(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, numberofseconds, 0);

    hh = time.getHours();
    mm = time.getMinutes();
    ss = time.getSeconds() 

    // Pad zero values to 00
    hh = (zero+hh).slice(-2);
    mm = (zero+mm).slice(-2);
    ss = (zero+ss).slice(-2);

    time = hh + ':' + mm + ':' + ss;
    return time; 
}
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Milliseconds to duration, the simple way:

// To have leading zero digits in strings.
function pad(num, size) {
    var s = num + "";
    while (s.length < size) s = "0" + s;
    return s;
}

// ms to time/duration
msToDuration = function(ms){
    var seconds = ms / 1000;
    var hh = Math.floor(seconds / 3600),
    mm = Math.floor(seconds / 60) % 60,
    ss = Math.floor(seconds) % 60,
    mss = ms % 1000;
    return pad(hh,2)+':'+pad(mm,2)+':'+pad(ss,2)+'.'+pad(mss,3);
}

It converts 327577 to 00:05:27.577.

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I liked Webjins answer the most, so i extended it to display days with a d suffix, made display conditional and included a s suffix on plain seconds:

function sec2str(t){
    var d = (Math.floor(t/86400) % 24),
        h = ('0'+Math.floor(t/3600) % 24).slice(-2),
        m = ('0'+Math.floor(t/60)%60).slice(-2),
        s = ('0' + t % 60).slice(-2);
    return (d>0?d+'d ':'')+(h>0?h+':':'')+(m>0?m+':':'')+(t>60?s:s+'s');
}

returns "3d 16:32:12" or "16:32:12" or "32:12" or "12s"

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I'm personally prefer the leading unit (days, hours, minutes) without leading zeros. But seconds should always be leaded by minutes (0:13), this presentation is easily considered as 'duration', without further explanation (marking as min, sec(s), etc.), usable in various languages (internationalization).

    // returns  (-)d.h:mm:ss(.f)
    //          (-)h:mm:ss(.f)
    //          (-)m:ss(.f)
    function formatSeconds (value, fracDigits) {
        var isNegative = false;
        if (isNaN(value)) {
            return value;
        } else if (value < 0) {
            isNegative = true;
            value = Math.abs(value);
        }
        var days = Math.floor(value / 86400);
        value %= 86400;
        var hours = Math.floor(value / 3600);
        value %= 3600;
        var minutes = Math.floor(value / 60);
        var seconds = (value % 60).toFixed(fracDigits || 0);
        if (seconds < 10) {
            seconds = '0' + seconds;
        }

        var res = hours ? (hours + ':' + ('0' + minutes).slice(-2) + ':' + seconds) : (minutes + ':' + seconds);
        if (days) {
            res = days + '.' + res;
        }
        return (isNegative ? ('-' + res) : res);
    }

//imitating the server side (.net, C#) duration formatting like:

    public static string Format(this TimeSpan interval)
    {
        string pattern;
        if (interval.Days > 0)          pattern = @"d\.h\:mm\:ss";
        else if (interval.Hours > 0)    pattern = @"h\:mm\:ss";
        else                            pattern = @"m\:ss";
        return string.Format("{0}", interval.ToString(pattern));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
try it under: jsfiddle.net/z4711/sknoewcr –  Peter Zehnder Mar 28 at 21:31

It's pretty easy,

function toTimeString(seconds) {
  return (new Date(seconds * 1000)).toUTCString().match(/(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d)/)[0];
}
share|improve this answer

As I am dissatisfied with the coding approach of the custom solutions presented here, I created a utility function myself called readableDuration. It is adapted for milliseconds which is kind of the standard time unit in JS, but you could easily convert from seconds like this:

var s = 3808; // Time in seconds
var str = readableDuration(s * 1000); // "1h 3m 28s"

Edit: I just proof-read and realized that OP wanted "hh:mm:ss" format badly, so I tweaked it. It has the format of "h+:mm:ss" since hours can be more than 2 digits, so that made more sense:

var str = readableDuration(3808); // "1:03:28"
share|improve this answer
2  
paste the code here? –  jedierikb Jul 7 '14 at 16:34

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