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I'm looking for a Pythonic way to get all the diagonals of a (square) matrix, represented as a list of lists.

Suppose I have the following matrix:

matrix = [[-2,  5,  3,  2],
          [ 9, -6,  5,  1],
          [ 3,  2,  7,  3],
          [-1,  8, -4,  8]]

Then the large diagonals are easy:

l = len(matrix[0])
print [matrix[i][i] for i in range(l)]              # [-2, -6, 7,  8]
print [matrix[l-1-i][i] for i in range(l-1,-1,-1)]  # [ 2,  5, 2, -1]

But I have trouble coming up with a way to generate all the diagonals. The output I'm looking for is:

[[-2], [9, 5], [3,-6, 3], [-1, 2, 5, 2], [8, 7, 1], [-4, 3], [8],
 [2], [3,1], [5, 5, 3], [-2, -6, 7, 8], [9, 2, -4], [3, 8], [-1]]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There are probably better ways to do it in numpy than below, but I'm not too familiar with it yet:

import numpy as np

matrix = np.array(
         [[-2,  5,  3,  2],
          [ 9, -6,  5,  1],
          [ 3,  2,  7,  3],
          [-1,  8, -4,  8]])

diags = [matrix[::-1,:].diagonal(i) for i in range(-3,4)]
diags.extend(matrix.diagonal(i) for i in range(3,-4,-1))
print [n.tolist() for n in diags]

Output

[[-2], [9, 5], [3, -6, 3], [-1, 2, 5, 2], [8, 7, 1], [-4, 3], [8], [2], [3, 1], [5, 5, 3], [-2, -6, 7, 8], [9, 2, -4], [3, 8], [-1]]

Edit: Updated to generalize for any matrix size.

import numpy as np

# Alter dimensions as needed
x,y = 3,4

# create a default array of specified dimensions
a = np.arange(x*y).reshape(x,y)
print a
print

# a.diagonal returns the top-left-to-lower-right diagonal "i"
# according to this diagram:
#
#  0  1  2  3  4 ...
# -1  0  1  2  3
# -2 -1  0  1  2
# -3 -2 -1  0  1
#  :
#
# You wanted lower-left-to-upper-right and upper-left-to-lower-right diagonals.
#
# The syntax a[slice,slice] returns a new array with elements from the sliced ranges,
# where "slice" is Python's [start[:stop[:step]] format.

# "::-1" returns the rows in reverse. ":" returns the columns as is,
# effectively vertically mirroring the original array so the wanted diagonals are
# lower-right-to-uppper-left.
#
# Then a list comprehension is used to collect all the diagonals.  The range
# is -x+1 to y (exclusive of y), so for a matrix like the example above
# (x,y) = (4,5) = -3 to 4.
diags = [a[::-1,:].diagonal(i) for i in range(-a.shape[0]+1,a.shape[1])]

# Now back to the original array to get the upper-left-to-lower-right diagonals,
# starting from the right, so the range needed for shape (x,y) was y-1 to -x+1 descending.
diags.extend(a.diagonal(i) for i in range(a.shape[1]-1,-a.shape[0],-1))

# Another list comp to convert back to Python lists from numpy arrays,
# so it prints what you requested.
print [n.tolist() for n in diags]

Output

[[ 0  1  2  3]
 [ 4  5  6  7]
 [ 8  9 10 11]]

[[0], [4, 1], [8, 5, 2], [9, 6, 3], [10, 7], [11], [3], [2, 7], [1, 6, 11], [0, 5, 10], [4, 9], [8]]
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I'm not too familiar with numpy either. Care to explain how this works and how you would generalize this for any n*n matrix. Thanks! –  BioGeek Jun 11 '11 at 10:30
1  
Updated with generalized explanation. –  Mark Tolonen Jun 11 '11 at 13:17
    
Thanks! Very helpfull and works like a charm. –  BioGeek Jun 12 '11 at 0:21
1  
Thanks! this is awesome. –  geekymartian Aug 1 at 23:43

Start with the diagonals that slope up-and-right.

If (x,y) is a rectangular coordinate inside the matrix, you want to transform to/from a coordinate scheme (p,q), where p is the number of the diagonal and q is the index along the diagonal. (So p=0 is the [-2] diagonal, p=1 is the [9,5] diagonal, p=2 is the [3,-6,3] diagonal, and so on.)

To transform a (p,q) into an (x,y), you can use:

x = q
y = p - q

Try plugging in values of p and q to see how this is working.

Now you just loop... For p from 0 to 2N-1, and q from max(0, p-N+1) to min(p, N-1). Transform p,q to x,y and print.

Then for the other diagonals, repeat the loops but use a different transformation:

x = N - 1 - q
y = p - q

(This effectively just flips the matrix left-right.)

Sorry I did not actually code this in Python. :-)

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This is for Moe.

I start off by making simple functions to copy rows or columns of any rectangular matrix.

def get_rows(grid):
    return [[cell for cell in row] for row in grid]

def get_cols(grid):
    cols = [[] for col in grid[0]]
    for row in grid:
        for col_index, cell in enumerate(row):
            cols[col_index].append(cell)
    return cols 

With these two functions I then get the diagonals by adding an increasing/decreasing buffer to the start/end of each row. I then get the columns of this buffered grid, then remove the buffer on each column afterwards. ie)

1 2 3    X X|X|X|1|2|3|X    | | |1|2|3|
4 5 6 => X X|X|4|5|6|X|X => | |4|5|6| | => [[7],[4,8],[1,5,9],[2,6],[3]]
7 8 9    X X|7|8|9|X|X|X    |7|8|9| | |

.

def get_forward_diagonals(grid):
    buff = ['X']*(len(grid[0])+1)
    buff_grid = []
    for row_index, row in enumerate(get_rows(grid)):
        buff_grid.append( buff[row_index:] + row + buff[:row_index+1] )
    cols = get_cols(buff_grid)[2:-1]
    for col in cols:
        while 'X' in col:
            col.remove('X')
    return cols

def get_backward_diagonals(grid):
    buff = ['X']*(len(grid[0])+1)
    buff_grid = []
    for row_index, row in enumerate(get_rows(grid)):
        buff_grid.append( buff[:row_index+1] + row + buff[row_index:] )
    cols = get_cols(buff_grid)[1:-2]
    for col in cols:
        while 'X' in col:
            col.remove('X')
    return cols
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