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Where can I find the time complexity for methods in the standard .Net library?

I use MSDN and it occasionally mentions time complexity, but not often (I ran into a similar problem with Java).

For example I want to know if Microsoft.FSharp.Collections.Set<'T>.MaximumElement is O(1) (which would be the case if the class explicity always tracks the max element.) or if it's O(lg n), (which would be the case if we had to search the map for it).

This is a specific example, but surely somewhere the big-O time complexity is documented.

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I still have no general answer for .net collections. Surely this must have been documented. –  Oxinabox Jun 17 '11 at 6:23
    
You can always write a program to clock the particular function in which you're interested, plotting the results against N for various input patterns. I think the main reason that time complexity is not documented is that this is an implementation detail, so the .NET team reserve the right to change the implementation specifics in the future. As such, the specification for these classes is based on their functionality and not their performance. If a specific performance characteristic is very important for your requirements, then it's probably better to implement the algorithm yourself. –  Dan Bryant Jun 29 '11 at 14:13
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4 Answers

I don't know in general (the other answer just posted perhaps gives you exactly what you're after) - but you can reflect this and other methods of course using ILSpy (a little awkward with FSharp code, true) and this eventually yields this function as C#:

internal static a maximumElementAux<a>(SetTree<a> s, a n)
{
  while (true)
  {
    SetTree<a> setTree = s;
    if (setTree is SetTree<a>.SetOne)
    {
      break;
    }
    if (setTree == null)
    {
      return n;
    }
    SetTree<a>.SetNode setNode = (SetTree<a>.SetNode)s;
    SetTree<a> arg_23_0 = setNode.item3;
    n = setNode.item1;
    s = arg_23_0;
  }
  return ((SetTree<a>.SetOne)s).item;
  return n;
}

Okay so this is not exactly 'proper' code in C# terms - but the presence of the while(true) loop implies it can't be O(1) at least; as for what it actually is... well, my head hurts too much to find out :)

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Seems this may have come up with this question: Asymptotic complexity of .NET collection classes

Those responses have some details about specifics, but as everyone else seems to be finding, there does not seem to be a comprehensive source with this information for all the .NET collections.

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I know a lot of the BCL, (List<T>, Dictionary<K, T>) ones have this documented on MSDN. You could reflect the assembly using dotPeek to find the answer.

Edit I found this by Googling.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/F_Sharp_Programming/Mutable_Collections#Differences_Between_.NET_BCL_and_F.23_Collections

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As far as I saw there was no reference for that, in the wikibook. It is the expected values for the implimentions explected to be used, But subtlyies exist in the implemention (eg the cheching or maximum value aluded to in my question) –  Oxinabox Jun 17 '11 at 6:22
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The documentation says it is build on a binary tree, and does not mention tracking the maximum element. If the documentation is correct, that means it should be O( log n). There used to be at least one mistake in the collections documentation (referring to an array-backed data structure as a binary search tree), but that has been corrected.

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1  
To be fair, an array is a perfectly reasonable store for a binary tree. See: webdocs.cs.ualberta.ca/~holte/T26/tree-as-array.html –  Mike Caron Jun 29 '11 at 14:01
    
Yes and no. Yes, as it is of course all mapped to main memory, which provides an array-like interface (but very much skewed to preferring access to data in the same cache line). No, as this provides not a reasonable implementation for any but the smallest (and balanced) trees. A multiway tree fits much better with current processor design –  Stephan Eggermont Jul 8 '11 at 12:59
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