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I am currently trying to save an array as bin file in Matlab, send it to Python and read it in Python. However, Matlab is showing errors when I run it. I am using the following codes:

Read the array in Matlab, convert to bin file and pass to Python:

array1 = rand(5,1); %% array1 is the desired array that needs to be sent to Python

fid = fopen('nazmul.bin','wb'); %% I want to save array1 in the nazmul.bin file

fwrite(fid,array1);

status=fclose(fid);

python('squared.py','nazmul.bin'); %% I want to send the parameters to squared.py program

squared.py file:

import sys

if __name__ == '__main__':
f = open("nazmul.bin", "rb")   # Trying to open the bin file

try:

   byte = f.read(1)       # Reading the bin file and saving it in the byte array

   while byte != "":

   # Do stuff with byte.

       byte = f.read(1)

   finally:

       f.close()

   print byte                # printing the byte array from Python

However, when I run this program, nothing gets printed. I guess that the bin file is not getting passed properly to the squared.py file.

Thanks for your feedback.

Nazmul

share|improve this question
    
I am using the proper format in if name == 'main'. But it's not appearing properly in the question. – Nazmul Jun 11 '11 at 4:41
    
In your python script, you're hardcoding the name 'nazmul.bin', so passing a value is not necessary. What happens if you try running it without passing a value? – Jeff Jun 11 '11 at 4:48
1  
Also, matlab might not be writing to the same path that python is reading from. If this is the case, you should specify the path in one or both of your scripts. – Jeff Jun 11 '11 at 4:51

There are several problems here.

  1. You should use double underscore when checking for 'main'. I.e. __main__ == "__main__".
  2. You are not collecting bytes but rather always storing the last byte read. Therefore, the last byte is always "".
  3. Finally, it seems like indentation is not correct. I assume this is just a stackoverflow formatting error.
  4. One more potential issue - When you use fwrite(fid, A) in MATLAB, it assumes that you want to write bytes (8 bit numbers). However, your rand() command generates reals, so MATLAB first rounds the results to integers and your binary file will hold '0' or '1' only.

Final note: Reading a file one byte at a time is probably very inefficient. It is probably better to read the file in large chunks, or - if it is a small file - read the entire file in one read() operation.

The corrected Python code is as follows:

if __name__ == '__main__':
   f = open("xxx.bin", "rb")   # Trying to open the bin file

   try:
     a = [];
     byte = f.read(1)       # Reading the bin file and saving it in the byte array
     while byte != "":
       a.append(byte);
       # Do stuff with byte.
       byte = f.read(1)

   finally:
       f.close()

   print a;
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