Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I am writing a program that takes in a textfile and goes through it and if it finds the message #GetFile "filename.txt" goes and gets that and stores it in the same arraylist as the first textfile but I am not able to think through the problem because if a file calls another file which calls another file and that file might be able to call another file. And I am wondering if I can call a method that contains a scanner class over and over again.

 This is file one 
 #GetFile "fileSecond.txt"

 ----------
 this is file two
 #GetFile "fileThird.txt" 
 ----------
 this is text file three
 #GetFile "fileOne.txt"

this is how different text file have it the --- <- is different textfile not same page sorry I didn't know how to show it here

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Project3
{
  public static void main(String[] args) 
  {
    ArrayList<String> text = new ArrayList<String>();
    File dictionaryFile = null; // set default value
    File dictionaryFileTwo = null;
    Scanner inputFile = null; // set default value
    Scanner inputFileTwo = null;
    // use a try-catch block to handle situations when the file is not present
    keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
    // fileName = keyboard.next();
    String fileName = "test1.txt";
    try {
      dictionaryFile = new File(fileName); // declare the file
      inputFile = new Scanner(dictionaryFile);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      // if File object creation failed (such as when file is not there)
      // then this code gets executed.
      // print the directory where this program expects to find dictionary
      System.out.println(System.getProperty("user.dir"));
      // ensure file exists and is in the correct directory
      if (!dictionaryFile.exists()) {
        System.out.println("*** Error *** \n"
            + "Your text file has the wrong name or is "
            + "in the wrong directory.  \n"
            + "Aborting program...\n\n");
        System.exit(-1); // Terminate the program
      }
    }// end catch

    // while there are words in the input file, add them to the dictionary
    while (inputFile.hasNext()) {
      if(inputFile.next().startsWith("#GetFile")){
        String filing = inputFile.next();
        System.out.println("HEY THIS IS THE FILE THAT I FOUND "+ filing);
        String fileNameSecond = filing;
        try {
          dictionaryFileTwo = new File(filing); // declare the file
          inputFile = new Scanner(dictionaryFile);
        }catch (Exception e) {
          // if File object creation failed (such as when file is not there)
          // then this code gets executed.
          // print the directory where this program expects to find dictionary
          System.out.println(System.getProperty("user.dir"));
          // ensure file exists and is in the correct directory
          if (!dictionaryFile.exists()) {
            System.out.println("*** Error *** \n"
                + "Your text file has the wrong name or is "
                + "in the wrong directory.  \n"
                + "Aborting program...\n\n");
            System.exit(-1); // Terminate the program
          }
        }// end catch
      } else {
        text.add(inputFile.nextLine());
      }
    }
    for(int i =0; i < text.size(); i++){
      System.out.println(text.get(i));
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Seems like a natural situation to use recursion. You have a loadFile(filename1) and it can call loadFile(filename2) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 11 '11 at 8:07
    
and it wouldn't through of arraylist because I want to store each textfile at the place where it is called. –  chuck finley Jun 11 '11 at 8:08
    
So basically, you want to implement the C-preprocessors #include functionality... is that correct? –  corlettk Jun 11 '11 at 8:11
    
yes that is EXACTLY want I want to accomplish but with a GetFile –  chuck finley Jun 11 '11 at 8:14
    
@ corlettk however I am having a hard time imagining how that works. –  chuck finley Jun 11 '11 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

The basic algorithm would be:

open the output-file

ExpandIncudes(input-file, output-file) {
  open input-file
  while (read line from input)
    if (line is-a #include) then
      ExpandIncudes(input-file)
    else
      write line to output-file
    endif
  next line
}

And no, I don't think you could keep reusing the same scanner for reading different files.

Cheers. Keith.

share|improve this answer
    
So I would have two scanner classes ? –  chuck finley Jun 11 '11 at 8:19
    
You would have one Scanner class and one scanner variable, but each call to the method has its own copy, you would have as many copies as you have files open at once. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 11 '11 at 8:49

Your question is a little muddled but it seems you need to investigate how to use some recursion here.

You'd just need a method that upon finding the "#GetFile" directive would then grab the file name to get and call the method again with this name.

public void parseFile(String filename) {
    //readline while not end of file...

    //is line a #GetFile directive?
        //parseFile(newFilename)  
}

... or something like that

share|improve this answer

Sibghatuk,

I'm going to presume that your homework's been handed in, so it's "safe" to just hand you "the answer".

I'd do it something like this:

package forums;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.IOException;

public class HashInclude
{
  private static final String[] INCLUDE_PATH = 
    System.getenv("INCLUDE_PATH").split(File.pathSeparator);

  public static void main(String... args) {
    try {
      for ( String filename : filenames ) {
        hashInclude(filename);
      }
    } catch (Exception e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }

  public static void hashInclude(String filename)
    throws FileNotFoundException, IOException
  {
    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(filename));
    try {
      String line = null;
      int lineCount = 0;
      while ( (line=reader.readLine()) != null ) {
        ++lineCount;
        if ( line.startsWith("#include ") ) {
          String targetFilename = line.replaceFirst("^#include[ \t]*", "").trim();
          if ( !targetFilename.matches("^[<\"][A-z0-9_]+\\.h[\">]$") )
            // not a <valid.h> or a "valid.h"
            throw new IncludeException(targetFilename, lineCount, filename);
          // <valid.h> --> valid.h
          targetFilename = targetFilename.substring(1, targetFilename.length()-1);
          // search directories in the INCLUDE_PATH for targetFilename
          for ( String dir : INCLUDE_PATH ) {
            File targetFile = new File(dir, targetFilename); // c:/path/to/valid.h
            if ( targetFile.exists() ) {
              hashInclude( targetFile.getAbsolutePath() ); // <<-- recursive call
              return;
            }
          } // next dir
          throw new FileNotFoundException("File " + targetFilename 
            + " not found in INCLUDE_PATH="+ System.getenv("INCLUDE_PATH"));
        } else {
          System.out.println(line);
        }
      } // next line
    } finally {
      reader.close();
    }
  }

}

class IncludeException extends RuntimeException {
  private static final long serialVersionUID = 0L;
  public IncludeException(String targetFilename, int lineCount, String filename) {
    super("Invalid #include: " + targetFilename + " at " + lineCount + " " + filename);
  }
}

I think that the above is a "reasaonbly elegant" solution to the problem... even if I do say so myself ;-)

Note that the hashInclude method recursively calls itself... recursion lends itself naturally to following an "arbitrary tree structure"... i.e. a tree whose precise structure is unknowable when you're writing the software... and therefore "recursion" is about the first thing pops into many programmers minds when they here the word "tree".

Please note that the above code implements a greatly-simplified version of the C preprocessor #include mechanism... but could (reasonably easily) be extended into a "proper preprocessor"... one that even (recursively) expands #defines.

Cheers. Keith.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mate I had given up on it after I started reading into it in depth and started reading up on overmyhead structures and codes. But this looks promising and understandable thank you ! –  chuck finley Jul 9 '11 at 9:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.