Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While working in a Java app, I recently was needing to assemble a comma-delimited list of values to pass to another web service without knowing how many elements there would be in advance. The best I could come up with off the top of my head was something like this:

public String appendWithDelimiter( String original, String addition, String delimiter ) {
	if ( original.equals( "" ) ) {
		return addition;
	} else {
		return original + delimiter + addition;
	}
}

String parameterString = "";
if ( condition ) parameterString = appendWithDelimiter( parameterString, "elementName", "," );
if ( anotherCondition ) parameterString = appendWithDelimiter( parameterString, "anotherElementName", "," );

I realize this isn't particularly efficient, since there are strings being created all over the place, but I was going for clarity more than optimization.

In Ruby, I can do something like this instead, which feels much more elegant:

parameterArray = [];
parameterArray << "elementName" if condition;
parameterArray << "anotherElementName" if anotherCondition;
parameterString = parameterArray.join(",");

But since Java lacks a join command, I couldn't figure out anything equivalent.

So, what's the best way to do this in Java?

share|improve this question
    
The StringbBilder is the way to go - java.lang.StringBuilder. –  ElYusubov Dec 16 '12 at 14:30
    
For Java 8 have a look at this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/22577623/1115554 –  micha Mar 22 at 12:31

29 Answers 29

up vote 163 down vote accepted

Apache's commons lang is your friend here - it provides a join method very similar to the one you refer to in Ruby:

StringUtils.join(java.lang.Iterable,char)

share|improve this answer
    
I am wondering - does this take into account if the String representation of an Object in the Collection contains the delimiter character itself? –  GreenieMeanie Jul 8 '09 at 20:03
2  
Exactly what i was looking for: StringUtils.join(java.util.Collection,String) from package org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils , the jar file is commons-lang3-3.0.1.jar –  Umar Aug 30 '11 at 6:58
40  
On Android you can use TextUtils.join() too. –  James Wald Feb 29 '12 at 23:07
1  
@James Wald, Thanks for info. –  anujprashar Jul 14 '12 at 7:15
1  
It is not the best way. It will always add the char even if the Object in the Collection is null/empty. Its nice and clean but sometimes it will print a double delimiter char. –  Stephan Schielke Aug 30 '12 at 8:32

You could write a little join-style utility method that works on java.util.Lists

public static String join(List<String> list, String delim) {

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    String loopDelim = "";

    for(String s : list) {

        sb.append(loopDelim);
        sb.append(s);            

        loopDelim = delim;
    }

    return sb.toString();
}

Then use it like so:

    List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

    if( condition )        list.add("elementName");
    if( anotherCondition ) list.add("anotherElementName");

    join(list, ",");
share|improve this answer
1  
why should you write your own method if at least 2 implementations (apache and guava) already exist? –  Tim Nov 24 '12 at 11:16
16  
This might, e.g., be useful if one wants to have fewer external dependencies. –  Thomas Zumbrunn Feb 9 '13 at 21:10

You can generalize it, but there's no join in Java, as you well say.

This might work better.

public static String join(Iterable<? extends CharSequence> s, String delimiter) {
    Iterator<? extends CharSequence> iter = s.iterator();
    if (!iter.hasNext()) return "";
    StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder(iter.next());
    while (iter.hasNext()) buffer.append(delimiter).append(iter.next());
    return buffer.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with this answer but can someone edit the signature so that it accepts Collection<String> instead of AbstractCollection<String>? The rest of the code should be the same but I think AbstractCollection is an implementation detail that doesn't matter here. –  Outlaw Programmer Sep 15 '08 at 14:19
    
Better still, use Iterable<String> and just use the fact that you can iterator over it. In your example you don't need the number of items in the collection, so this is even more general. –  Jason Cohen Sep 15 '08 at 18:34
1  
Or even better, use Iterable<? extends Charsequence> and then you can accept collections of StringBuilders and Strings and streams and other string-like things. :) –  Jason Cohen Sep 15 '08 at 18:35
2  
You want to use a StringBuilder instead. They are identical, except StringBuffer provides unnecessary thread safety. Can someone please edit it! –  Casebash Aug 11 '10 at 4:43
1  
This code has several errors. 1. CharSequence has a capital s. 2. s.iterator() returns a Iterator<? extends CharSequence>. 3. An Iterable doesn't have a isEmpty() method, use the next() method instead –  Casebash Aug 12 '10 at 0:42

The Google's Guava library has com.google.common.base.Joiner class which helps to solve such tasks.

Samples:

"My pets are: " + Joiner.on(", ").join(Arrays.asList("rabbit", "parrot", "dog")); 
// returns "My pets are: rabbit, parrot, dog"

Joiner.on(" AND ").join(Arrays.asList("field1=1" , "field2=2", "field3=3"));
// returns "field1=1 AND field2=2 AND field3=3"

Joiner.on(",").skipNulls().join(Arrays.asList("London", "Moscow", null, "New York", null, "Paris"));
// returns "London,Moscow,New York,Paris"

Joiner.on(", ").useForNull("Team held a draw").join(Arrays.asList("FC Barcelona", "FC Bayern", null, null, "Chelsea FC", "AC Milan"));
// returns "FC Barcelona, FC Bayern, Team held a draw, Team held a draw, Chelsea FC, AC Milan"

Here is an article about Guava's string utilities.

share|improve this answer

Use an approach based on java.lang.StringBuilder! ("A mutable sequence of characters. ")

Like you mentioned, all those string concatenations are creating Strings all over. StringBuilder won't do that.

Why StringBuilder instead of StringBuffer? From the StringBuilder javadoc:

Where possible, it is recommended that this class be used in preference to StringBuffer as it will be faster under most implementations.

share|improve this answer
2  
Yep. Also, StringBuffer is thread-safe, while StringBuilder isn't. –  Jon Mar 21 '13 at 17:33

In the case of Android, the StringUtils class from commons isn't available, so for this I used

android.text.TextUtils.join(CharSequence delimiter, Iterable tokens)

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/text/TextUtils.html

share|improve this answer

I would use Google Collections. There is a nice Join facility.
http://google-collections.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/index.html?com/google/common/base/Join.html

But if I wanted to write it on my own,

package util;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Iterable;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class Utils {
    // accept a collection of objects, since all objects have toString()
    public static String join(String delimiter, Iterable<? extends Object> objs) {
        if (objs.isEmpty()) {
            return "";
        }
        Iterator<? extends Object> iter = objs.iterator();
        StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder();
        buffer.append(iter.next());
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            buffer.append(delimiter).append(iter.next());
        }
        return buffer.toString();
    }

    // for convenience
    public static String join(String delimiter, Object... objs) {
        ArrayList<Object> list = new ArrayList<Object>();
        Collections.addAll(list, objs);
        return join(delimiter, list);
    }
}

I think it works better with an object collection, since now you don't have to convert your objects to strings before you join them.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know Google had a collections class. Thanks for the link! –  Sean McMains Sep 15 '08 at 14:38
    
+1 for Google Guava! –  spaaarky21 Apr 12 '12 at 16:11
    
This is the best one I've seen on several pages. You don't need to use an old style for loop and the loop is very clean and small. This is THE ANSWER. –  Jess Apr 1 '13 at 17:43

Apache commons StringUtils class has a join method.

share|improve this answer
    
I (heart) Apache commons. Did not even know that existed... –  Stu Thompson Sep 15 '08 at 14:22
    
I hate Apache commons. The reflection-based toString helper was written by idiots, for idiots. –  erickson Sep 15 '08 at 14:39
3  
Well don't use that bit then. Sheesh. –  skaffman Nov 15 '09 at 11:39

In Java 8 you can use String.join():

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("foo", "bar", "baz");
String joined = String.join(" and ", list); // "foo and bar and baz"

Also have a look at this answer for a Stream API example.

share|improve this answer

Use StringBuilder and Class Separator.

StringBuilder $ = new StringBuilder();
Separator sep = new Separator(", ");
for (String each : list) {
    $.append(sep).append(each);
}

Separator wraps a delimiter. The delimiter is returned by Separator's toString method, unless on the first call which returns the empty string!

share|improve this answer
    
What about modifying Separator so that it uses a StringBuilder instead of concatenating Strings? –  Mohamed Nuur Jun 2 '11 at 22:14
    
@Mohamed Separator just returns the delimiter, it does not concatenate the string itself. –  akuhn Jun 9 '11 at 0:41

You can use Java's StringBuilder type for this. There's also StringBuffer, but it contains extra thread safety logic that is often unnecessary.

share|improve this answer

Why not write your own join() method? It would take as parameters collection of Strings and a delimiter String. Within the method iterate over the collection and build up your result in a StringBuffer.

share|improve this answer

You should probably use a StringBuilder with the append method to construct your result, but otherwise this is as good of a solution as Java has to offer.

share|improve this answer

Why don't you do in Java the same thing you are doing in ruby, that is creating the delimiter separated string only after you've added all the pieces to the array?

ArrayList<String> parms = new ArrayList<String>();
if (someCondition) parms.add("someString");
if (anotherCondition) parms.add("someOtherString");
// ...
String sep = ""; StringBuffer b = new StringBuffer();
for (String p: parms) {
    b.append(sep);
    b.append(p);
    sep = "yourDelimiter";
}

You may want to move that for loop in a separate helper method, and also use StringBuilder instead of StringBuffer...

Edit: fixed the order of appends.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, why would you use StringBuffer instead of StringBuilder (as you are using Java 1.5+)? You also have your appends the wrong way around. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 15 '08 at 14:22

With Java 5 variable args, so you don't have to stuff all your strings into a collection or array explicitly:

import junit.framework.Assert;
import org.junit.Test;

public class StringUtil
{
    public static String join(String delim, String... strings)
    {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

        if (strings != null)
        {
            for (String str : strings)
            {
                if (builder.length() > 0)
                {
                    builder.append(delim).append(" ");
                }
                builder.append(str);
            }
        }           
        return builder.toString();
    }
    @Test
    public void joinTest()
    {
        Assert.assertEquals("", StringUtil.join(",", null));
        Assert.assertEquals("", StringUtil.join(",", ""));
        Assert.assertEquals("", StringUtil.join(",", new String[0]));
        Assert.assertEquals("test", StringUtil.join(",", "test"));
        Assert.assertEquals("foo, bar", StringUtil.join(",", "foo", "bar"));
        Assert.assertEquals("foo, bar, x", StringUtil.join(",", "foo", "bar", "x"));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you're using GS Collections, you can use makeString() or appendString().

makeString() returns a String representation, similar to toString().

It has three forms

  • makeString(start, separator, end)
  • makeString(separator) defaults start and end to empty strings
  • makeString() defaults the separator to ", " (comma and space)

Code example:

MutableList<Integer> list = FastList.newListWith(1, 2, 3);
assertEquals("[1/2/3]", list.makeString("[", "/", "]"));
assertEquals("1/2/3", list.makeString("/"));
assertEquals("1, 2, 3", list.makeString());
assertEquals(list.toString(), list.makeString("[", ", ", "]"));

appendString() is similar to makeString(), but it appends to an Appendable (like StringBuilder) and is void. It has the same three forms, with an additional first argument, the Appendable.

MutableList<Integer> list = FastList.newListWith(1, 2, 3);
Appendable appendable = new StringBuilder();
list.appendString(appendable, "[", "/", "]");
assertEquals("[1/2/3]", appendable.toString());

If you can't convert your collection to a GS Collections type, just adapt it with the relevant adapter.

List<Object> list = ...;
ListAdapter.adapt(list).makeString(",");

Note: I am a developer on GS collections.

share|improve this answer

And a minimal one (if you don't want to include Apache Commons or Gauva into project dependencies just for the sake of joining strings)

/**
 *
 * @param delim : String that should be kept in between the parts
 * @param parts : parts that needs to be joined
 * @return  a String that's formed by joining the parts
 */
private static final String join(String delim, String... parts) {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < parts.length - 1; i++) {
        builder.append(parts[i]).append(File.separator);
    }
    if(parts.length > 0){
        builder.append(parts[parts.length - 1]);
    }
    return builder.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

You can try something like this:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
if (condition) { sb.append("elementName").append(","); }
if (anotherCondition) { sb.append("anotherElementName").append(","); }
String parameterString = sb.toString();
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it will leave a stray comma on the end of the string, which I'd hoped to avoid. (Of course, since you know it's there, you can then trim it, but that smells a bit inelegant too.) –  Sean McMains Sep 15 '08 at 14:36

So basically something like this:

public static String appendWithDelimiter(String original, String addition, String delimiter) {

if (original.equals("")) {
    return addition;
} else {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(original.length() + addition.length() + delimiter.length());
        sb.append(original);
        sb.append(delimiter);
        sb.append(addition);
        return sb.toString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that he seems to be calling appendWithDelimiter() allot. The solution should instance one and only one StringBuffer and work with that single instance. –  Stu Thompson Sep 15 '08 at 14:22

Don't know if this really is any better, but at least it's using StringBuilder, which may be slightly more efficient.

Down below is a more generic approach if you can build up the list of parameters BEFORE doing any parameter delimiting.

// Answers real question
public String appendWithDelimiters(String delimiter, String original, String addition) {
	StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(original);
	if(sb.length()!=0) {
		sb.append(delimiter).append(addition);
	} else {
		sb.append(addition);
	}
	return sb.toString();
}


// A more generic case.
// ... means a list of indeterminate length of Strings.
public String appendWithDelimitersGeneric(String delimiter, String... strings) {
	StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
	for (String string : strings) {
		if(sb.length()!=0) {
			sb.append(delimiter).append(string);
		} else {
			sb.append(string);
		}
	}

	return sb.toString();
}

public void testAppendWithDelimiters() {
	String string = appendWithDelimitersGeneric(",", "string1", "string2", "string3");
}
share|improve this answer

Your approach is not too bad, but you should use a StringBuffer instead of using the + sign. The + has the big disadvantage that a new String instance is being created for each single operation. The longer your string gets, the bigger the overhead. So using a StringBuffer should be the fastest way:

public StringBuffer appendWithDelimiter( StringBuffer original, String addition, String delimiter ) {
        if ( original == null ) {
                StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
                buffer.append(addition);
                return buffer;
        } else {
                buffer.append(delimiter);
                buffer.append(addition);
                return original;
        }
}

After you have finished creating your string simply call toString() on the returned StringBuffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Using StringBuffer here will just make it slower for no good reason. Using the + operator will internally use the faster StringBuilder so he is winning nothing but thread safety he doesn't need by using StringBuffer instead. –  Fredrik Jul 8 '09 at 20:14
    
Also... The statement "The + has the big disadvantage that a new String instance is being created for each single operation" is false. The compiler will generate StringBuilder.append() calls out of them. –  Fredrik Jul 8 '09 at 20:17

Instead of using string concatenation, you should use StringBuilder if your code is not threaded, and StringBuffer if it is.

share|improve this answer

You're making this a little more complicated than it has to be. Let's start with the end of your example:

String parameterString = "";
if ( condition ) parameterString = appendWithDelimiter( parameterString, "elementName", "," );
if ( anotherCondition ) parameterString = appendWithDelimiter( parameterString, "anotherElementName", "," );

With the small change of using a StringBuilder instead of a String, this becomes:

StringBuilder parameterString = new StringBuilder();
if (condition) parameterString.append("elementName").append(",");
if (anotherCondition) parameterString.append("anotherElementName").append(",");
...

When you're done (I assume you have to check a few other conditions as well), just make sure you remove the tailing comma with a command like this:

if (parameterString.length() > 0) 
    parameterString.deleteCharAt(parameterString.length() - 1);

And finally, get the string you want with

parameterString.toString();

You could also replace the "," in the second call to append with a generic delimiter string that can be set to anything. If you have a list of things you know you need to append (non-conditionally), you could put this code inside a method that takes a list of strings.

share|improve this answer
//Note: if you have access to Java5+, 
//use StringBuilder in preference to StringBuffer.  
//All that has to be replaced is the class name.  
//StringBuffer will work in Java 1.4, though.

appendWithDelimiter( StringBuffer buffer, String addition, 
    String delimiter ) {
    if ( buffer.length() == 0) {
        buffer.append(addition);
    } else {
        buffer.append(delimiter);
        buffer.append(addition);
    }
}


StringBuffer parameterBuffer = new StringBuffer();
if ( condition ) { 
    appendWithDelimiter(parameterBuffer, "elementName", "," );
}
if ( anotherCondition ) {
    appendWithDelimiter(parameterBuffer, "anotherElementName", "," );
}

//Finally, to return a string representation, call toString() when returning.
return parameterBuffer.toString();
share|improve this answer

So a couple of things you might do to get the feel that it seems like you're looking for:

1) Extend List class - and add the join method to it. The join method would simply do the work of concatenating and adding the delimiter (which could be a param to the join method)

2) It looks like Java 7 is going to be adding extension methods to java - which allows you just to attach a specific method on to a class: so you could write that join method and add it as an extension method to List or even to Collection.

Solution 1 is probably the only realistic one, now, though since Java 7 isn't out yet :) But it should work just fine.

To use both of these, you'd just add all your items to the List or Collection as usual, and then call the new custom method to 'join' them.

share|improve this answer

using Dollar is simple as typing:

String joined = $(aCollection).join(",");

NB: it works also for Array and other data types

Implementation

Internally it uses a very neat trick:

@Override
public String join(String separator) {
    Separator sep = new Separator(separator);
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for (T item : iterable) {
        sb.append(sep).append(item);
    }

    return sb.toString();
}

the class Separator return the empty String only the first time that it is invoked, then it returns the separator:

class Separator {

    private final String separator;
    private boolean wasCalled;

    public Separator(String separator) {
        this.separator = separator;
        this.wasCalled = false;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        if (!wasCalled) {
            wasCalled = true;
            return "";
        } else {
            return separator;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if I want to use separator on each line(record) of a file or something like that? every time create a new Separator? the moment you introduced an attribute wasCalled, you have added threading concerns. Finally what is $? This was a Java question. –  ring bearer Feb 3 at 6:01

Slight improvement [speed] of version from izb:

public static String join(String[] strings, char del)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    int len = strings.length;

    if(len > 1) 
    {
       len -= 1;
    }else
    {
       return strings[0];
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
       sb.append(strings[i]).append(del);
    }

    sb.append(strings[i]);

    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

in Java 8 you can do this like:

list.stream().map(Object::toString)
                        .collect(Collectors.joining(delimiter));

if list has nulls you can use:

list.stream().map(String::valueOf)
                .collect(Collectors.joining(delimiter))
share|improve this answer
public static String join(String[] strings, char del)
{
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    int len = strings.length;
    boolean appended = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        if (appended)
        {
            sb.append(del);
        }
        sb.append(""+strings[i]);
        appended = true;
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.