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Is strlen(const char *s) defined when s is not null-terminated, and if so, what does it return?

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3  
Ask yourself: How should strlen() know where your string ends, if it's not null-terminated? –  DevSolar Mar 10 '09 at 20:50
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Technically speaking, there is no such thing as a C string that is not NUL-terminated, because the NUL-Terminator is defined to be part of the C string :) –  FredOverflow Oct 28 '11 at 16:37

9 Answers 9

up vote 16 down vote accepted

No, it is not defined. It may result in a memory access violation, as it will keep counting until it reaches the first memory byte whose value is 0.

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It can also cause demons to fly out your nose. catb.org/jargon/html/N/nasal-demons.html –  Paul Tomblin Mar 10 '09 at 18:02

From the C99 standard:

The strlen function returns the number of characters that precede the terminating null character.

If there is no null character that means the result is undefined.

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May be You need strnlen?

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Unfortunately, this isn't part of standard C. –  joveha Mar 12 '09 at 15:09

Not really, and it will cause bad things.

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If your string is not NUL terminated, the function will keep looking until it finds one.

If you are lucky, this will cause your program to crash.

If you are not lucky, you will get a larger than expected length back, with a lot of 'unexpected' values in it.

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It will return the number of characters encountered before '\0' is found.

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It is not defined. It causes undefined behavior which means anything can happen, most likely your program will crash.

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strlen() only works (does something useful) on null-terminated strings; you'll get an entirely undefined result if you pass in anything other than that. If you're lucky, it won't cause a crash :)

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correction, if he is lucky it will crash. You wouldn't want this type of error to go unnoticed :-P. –  Evan Teran Mar 10 '09 at 18:05

It is always defined.

It will return the length of the "string" until it reaches a byte with a null in it. Bad idea because this can cause a buffer overflow.

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1  
No, it's not defined. Once you start traversing beyond the space that was allocated for the string, either through malloc or on the stack/heap, the results are strictly undefined. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 10 '09 at 18:04

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