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I just have a simple code to practice Object C.. I am not sure why I can this "WARNING"? My code is below

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@interface MyClass : NSObject {
@private
    NSDate *mdate;
}

@property (retain) NSDate *mdate;

@end

==================================

#import "MyClass.h"


@implementation MyClass

@synthesize mdate;

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code here.
        mdate = [[NSDate date] autorelease];
    }

    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [super dealloc];
}

@end

=============================================

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "MyClass.h"

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    MyClass *mclass = [[MyClass alloc]init];
    NSDate *myBirthday;
    NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc]init];
    [dateFormat setDateFormat:@"yyyy/MM/dd"];
    myBirthday=[dateFormat dateFromString:@"1990/09/02"];

    [mclass setMdate:myBirthday];
    NSLog(@"My Birthday is %@",[mclass mdate]);
    // insert code here...
    NSLog(@"Hello, World!");

    [mclass release];
    //[dateFormat release];

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

and in [pool drain] -> i got the message after I ran.

I am really newbie on Object C. Could someone please explain what I missed? I think this cause my memory management(?) btw, I was writing this for console.

share|improve this question
    
You don't release the pool object, which is a memory leak, although the app terminates directly after it, it's better to release it instead of draining it. Releasing it will drain it for you. –  user142019 Jun 11 '11 at 13:06
    
Actually, drain drains the pool and releases it. That line of code, at least, is correct. –  bbum Jun 11 '11 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

Mdate is over released.

In general, your memory management is quite wrong. Read the "Cocoa memory management guide" as it explains the relatively simple rules clearly.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 and enable "Run Static Analyser" in the build settings. –  user142019 Jun 11 '11 at 13:05

you should not release the object which are neither alloced or init by you.

mdate = [[NSDate date] autorelease]; //Wrong statement.

In your init function of MyClass, you should not call autorelease on the NSDate object,which you don't create , you get it from iOS framework and iOS own the responsibility to release it.

Here is the case of your mdate object overreleased.

mdate = [NSDate date]; //Correct statement.

Read the Apple Memory Management Programming Guide

share|improve this answer

If your .h file is defined like this:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
@private
    NSDate *mdate;
}

@property (retain) NSDate *mdate;

@end

Then your .m file should look like this:

#import "MyClass.h"

@implementation MyClass

@synthesize mdate;

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // mdate = [[NSDate date] autorelease];  WRONG
        // mdate = [NSDate date];  WRONG

        mdate = [[NSDate date] retain];  CORRECT
        // mdate = [[NSDate alloc] init];  CORRECT
        // mdate = [[[[NSDate alloc] init] autorelease] retain]; CORRECT (but weird)

        // self.mdate = [NSDate date];  CORRECT

    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [mdate release]; // NECESSARY
    [super dealloc];
}

@end
share|improve this answer

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