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Does a huge amount of warnings make C# compile time longer?

In MSBuild / Visual Studio, if your code generates a lot of FXCop or StyleCop warnings, does this have a performance impact on the build time?

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marked as duplicate by Filip Ekberg, slugster, WTP, jonsca, Felice Pollano Jun 11 '11 at 13:28

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Build time should be your least concern when you get many warnings. –  delnan Jun 11 '11 at 12:59
    
Build time should be your least concern anyway. It's runtime performance what really matters. –  user142019 Jun 11 '11 at 13:03
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@WTP: Well, lower build time makes the write-compile-debug-cycle go faster, ultimately increasing productivity, so it is an advantage. Of course, just like squeezing a 1% speedup out of initialization code is pointless, shaving 1 second off a build that takes several minutes helps noone. –  delnan Jun 11 '11 at 13:09
    
@delnan If you have a build time of several minutes you either build for the first time, don't test enough or you recompile everything over and over again. Good compilers will keep the compiled code and only recompile what has changed. I have projects with over five hundred source files, when I change one file the total compile time is about a second. Though I do agree with you. (note: I have never worked with Visual Studio, only GCC and LLVM.) –  user142019 Jun 11 '11 at 13:15
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not the warnings that will add to the build time, it's the static analysis tools that you are using that will slow down, no matter whether the code is valid or not.

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