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These are in a folder:

This_is_a_very_good_movie-y08iPnx_ktA.mp4
myMovie2-lKESbDzUwUg.mp4
his_is_another_movie-lKESbDzUwUg.mp4

How do I fetch the first part of the string mymovie1 from the file by giving the last part, y08iPnx_ktA? Something like:

get_first_part("y08iPnx_kTA") #=> "This_is_a_very_good_movie"
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3  
mymovie1, where is that coming from? Or do you want This_is_a_very_good_movie? –  Qtax Jun 11 '11 at 16:47
    
Can filenames have more than one hyphen in them, or do you normalize the names to remove hyphens before adding the hash? –  the Tin Man Jun 11 '11 at 18:09
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Break the problem into into parts. The method get_first_part should go something like:

  1. Use Dir to get a listing of files.

  2. Iterate over each file and;

    1. Extract the "name" ('This_is_a_very_good_movie') and the "tag" ('y08iPnx_ktA'). The same regex should be used for each file.

    2. If the "tag" matches what is being looked for, return "name".

Happy coding.


Play around in the REPL and have fun :-)

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thanks for your quick answer –  mko Jun 13 '11 at 15:16
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def get_first_part(path, suffix)
  Dir.entries(path).find do |fname|
    File.basename(fname, File.extname(fname)).end_with?(suffix)
  end.split(suffix).first
end

Kind of expands on the answer from @Steve Wilhelm -- except doesn't use glob (there's no need for it when we're only working with filenames), avoids Regexp and uses File.exname(fname) to the File.basename call so you don't have to include the file extension. Also returns the string "This_is_a_very_good_movie" instead of an array of files.

This will of course raise if no file could be found.. in which case if you just want to return nil if a match couldn't be found:

def get_first_part(path, suffix)
  file = Dir.entries(path).find do |fname|
    File.basename(fname, File.extname(fname)).end_with?(suffix)
  end
  file.split(suffix).first if file
end
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Can it be done cleaner than this? REVISED based on @Tin Man's suggestion

def get_first_part(path, suffix)
  Dir.glob(path + "*" + suffix + "*").map { |x| File.basename(x).gsub(Regexp.new("#{suffix}\.*$"),'') } 
end

puts get_first_part("/path/to/files/", "-y08iPnx_kTA")
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+1 For the clever trick of using a glob with a while card. I would argue that do/end and more newlines would make it cleaner, but.. ;-) Why the map though? –  user166390 Jun 11 '11 at 17:26
    
Dir.glob returned fully qualified paths to each file. There may be more than one file that matches the pattern. @yozloy wanted just the basename without the suffix. Is there a better way to do this? –  Steve Wilhelm Jun 11 '11 at 17:38
    
The OP doesn't want to give a suffix, he wants to give a sub-string. Add ` + '*'` to your glob and you'll meet his requirement. –  the Tin Man Jun 11 '11 at 18:06
    
Your solution is a wow! after figure your code out by myself, there is only one spot left I'm not sure .gsub(Regexp.new("#{suffix}\.*$")) what I understand is that if escape the dot. so the * repeat the '\.' several time until reach the end of line, but it's only only 1 dot in the '.mp4' extname. what I think is Regexp.new("#{suffix}\..*$"), this make sense to me, although your code totally works, however I don't understand –  mko Jun 14 '11 at 8:36
    
When I escape the period (aka dot), it means match the period literally. I did this so that the regex would math the provided suffix string followed by a file suffix. Using your example, It will find aaa-y08iPnx_kTA.mp4 but avoid bbb-y08iPnx_kTA-something-else.mp4. –  Steve Wilhelm Jun 14 '11 at 15:23
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If the filenames only have a single hyphen:

path = '/Users/greg/Desktop/test'
target = 'rb'

def get_files(path, target)
  Dir.chdir(path) do
    return Dir["*#{ target }*"].map{ |f| f.split('-').first }
  end
end

puts get_files(path, 'y08iPnx_ktA')
# >> This_is_a_very_good_movie

If there are multiple hyphens:

def get_files(path, target)
  Dir.chdir(path) do
    return Dir["*#{ target }*"].map{ |f| f.split(target).first.chop }
  end
end

puts get_files(path, 'y08iPnx_ktA')
# >> This_is_a_very_good_movie

If the code is assumed to be running from inside the directory containing the files, then Dir.chdir can be removed, simplifying things to either:

puts Dir["*#{ target }*"].map{ |f| f.split('-').first }
# >> This_is_a_very_good_movie

or

puts Dir["*#{ target }*"].map{ |f| f.split(target).first.chop }
# >> This_is_a_very_good_movie
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Tim Man Thanks for letting me know the usage of Dir[], –  mko Jun 14 '11 at 8:54
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