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I have a code in which the character array is populated by integers (converted to char arrays), and read by another function which reconverts it back to integers. I have used the following function to get the conversion to char array:

char data[64];
int a = 10;
std::string str = boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(a);
memcpy(data + 8*k,str.c_str(),sizeof(str.c_str()));   //k varies from 0 to 7

and the reconversion back to characters is done using:

char temp[8];
memcpy(temp,data+8*k,8);
int a = atoi(temp);

This works fine in general, but when I try to do it as part of a project involving qt (ver 4.7), it compiles fine and gives me segmentation faults when it tries to read using memcpy(). Note that the segmentation fault happens only while in the reading loop and not while writing data. I dont know why this happens, but I want to get it done by any method.

So, are there any other other functions which I can use which can take in the character array, the first bit and the last bit and convert it into the integer. Then I wouldnt have to use memcpy() at all. What I am trying to do is something like this:

new_atoi(data,8*k,8*(k+1)); // k varies from 0 to 7

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are copying only a 4 characters (dependent on your system's pointer width). This will leave numbers of 4+ characters non-null terminated, leading to runaway strings in the input to atoi

 sizeof(str.c_str()) //i.e. sizeof(char*) = 4 (32 bit systems)

should be

 str.length() + 1

Or the characters will not be nullterminated

STL Only:

make_testdata(): see all the way down

Why don't you use streams...?

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> data = make_testdata();

    std::ostringstream oss;
    std::copy(data.begin(), data.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(oss, "\t"));

    std::stringstream iss(oss.str());

    std::vector<int> clone;
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(iss), std::istream_iterator<int>(),
              std::back_inserter(clone));

    //verify that clone now contains the original random data:
    //bool ok = std::equal(data.begin(), data.end(), clone.begin());

    return 0;
}

You could do it a lot faster in plain C with atoi/itoa and some tweaks, but I reckon you should be using binary transmission (see Boost Spirit Karma and protobuf for good libraries) if you need the speed.

Boost Karma/Qi:

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/karma.hpp>

namespace qi=::boost::spirit::qi;
namespace karma=::boost::spirit::karma;

static const char delimiter = '\0';

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> data = make_testdata();

    std::string astext;
//  astext.reserve(3 * sizeof(data[0]) * data.size()); // heuristic pre-alloc
    std::back_insert_iterator<std::string> out(astext);

    {
        using namespace karma;
        generate(out, delimit(delimiter) [ *int_ ], data);
    //  generate_delimited(out, *int_, delimiter, data); // equivalent
    //  generate(out, int_ % delimiter, data); // somehow much slower!
    }

    std::string::const_iterator begin(astext.begin()), end(astext.end());
    std::vector<int> clone;
    qi::parse(begin, end, qi::int_ % delimiter, clone);

    //verify that clone now contains the original random data:
    //bool ok = std::equal(data.begin(), data.end(), clone.begin());

    return 0;
}

If you wanted to do architecture independent binary serialization instead, you'd use this tiny adaptation making things a zillion times faster (see benchmark below...):

karma::generate(out, *karma::big_dword, data);
// ...
qi::parse(begin, end, *qi::big_dword, clone);

Boost Serialization

The best performance can be reached when using Boost Serialization in binary mode:

#include <sstream>
#include <boost/archive/binary_oarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/binary_iarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/serialization/vector.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> data = make_testdata();

    std::stringstream ss;
    {
        boost::archive::binary_oarchive oa(ss);
        oa << data;
    }

    std::vector<int> clone;
    {
        boost::archive::binary_iarchive ia(ss);
        ia >> clone;
    }

    //verify that clone now contains the original random data:
    //bool ok = std::equal(data.begin(), data.end(), clone.begin());

    return 0;
}

Testdata

(common to all versions above)

#include <boost/random.hpp>

// generates a deterministic pseudo-random vector of 32Mio ints
std::vector<int> make_testdata()
{
    std::vector<int> testdata;

    testdata.resize(2 << 24);
    std::generate(testdata.begin(), testdata.end(), boost::mt19937(0));

    return testdata;
}

Benchmarks

I benchmarked it by

  • using input data of 2<<24 (33554432) random integers
  • not displaying output (we don't want to measure the scrolling performance of our terminal)
  • the rough timings were
    • STL only version isn't too bad actually at 12.6s
    • Karma/Qi text version ran in 18s 5.1s, thanks to Arlen's hint at generate_delimited :)
    • Karma/Qi binary version (big_dword) in only 1.4s (roughly 12x 3-4x as fast)
    • Boost Serialization takes the cake with around 0.8s (or when subsituting text archives instead of binaries, around 13s)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. What you are saying is correct, that was a mistake. What I want is to convert integers into char* format and send them. Since, the size of the char* varies with the integer size, how will the receiving end be able to convert it back to integers? –  Neel Mehta Jun 11 '11 at 19:52
    
I implemented what you did, but the problem of memcpy() at receiving end is still there. So, I am still looking for a function like new_itoa() as defined in my question. Thanks for your help. –  Neel Mehta Jun 11 '11 at 20:24
    
Well, I have added my $0.02 of advice to my answer –  sehe Jun 11 '11 at 20:30
    
Ok, my $0.02 grew into my $20. I realize all of this might not interest you, but it interested me, so I figured I'd publish the findings :) –  sehe Jun 11 '11 at 22:46
    
@sehe The Karma/Qi text version should be much faster than the STL. I improved your code and it runs twice as fast than the STL. –  Arlen Jun 13 '11 at 13:50

There is absolutely no reason for the Karma/Qi text version to be any slower than the STL version. I improved @sehe implementation of the Karma/Qi text version to reflect that claim.

The following Boost Karma/Qi text version is more than twice as fast as the STL version:

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/karma.hpp>
#include <boost/random.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_core.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_operator.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_stl.hpp>

namespace ascii = boost::spirit::ascii;
namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;
namespace karma = boost::spirit::karma;
namespace phoenix = boost::phoenix;


template <typename OutputIterator>
void generate_numbers(OutputIterator& sink, const std::vector<int>& v){

  using karma::int_;
  using karma::generate_delimited;
  using ascii::space;

  generate_delimited(sink, *int_, space, v);
}

template <typename Iterator>
void parse_numbers(Iterator first, Iterator last, std::vector<int>& v){

  using qi::int_;
  using qi::phrase_parse;
  using ascii::space;
  using qi::_1;
  using phoenix::push_back;
  using phoenix::ref;

  phrase_parse(first, last, *int_[push_back(ref(v), _1)], space);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

  static boost::mt19937 rng(0); // make test deterministic
  std::vector<int> data;
  data.resize(2 << 24);
  std::generate(data.begin(), data.end(), rng);

  std::string astext;
  std::back_insert_iterator<std::string> out(astext);
  generate_numbers(out, data);

  //std::cout << astext << std::endl;

  std::string::const_iterator begin(astext.begin()), end(astext.end());
  std::vector<int> clone;
  parse_numbers(begin, end, clone);

  //verify that clone now contains the original random data:
  //std::copy(clone.begin(), clone.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ","));

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Out of all the complicating code only this one makes a difference: the API generate_delimited turns out much quicker than the equivalent karma::int_ % delimiter. I have updated that in my answer, thanks. I have shown all other possible tweaks (using phoenix_stl and/or using phrase_parse) to be marginally slower. Also note, that in case of binary formatter all differences evaporate since there is no delimiting involved –  sehe Jun 13 '11 at 18:55
    
I found that using the delimit directive is equivalent to using the generate_delimited API here; I also tracked the difference down to the internal output iterator wrapper using the buffering and counting flags from generator_properties. I'll ask on the spirit mailing list why this happens (and whether it is by design) –  sehe Jun 13 '11 at 22:44
    
fyi: boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/… –  sehe Jun 13 '11 at 23:10

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