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So say I have a subclass that extends a superclass. In what scenarios do I need to explicitly type super() to get the superclass constructor to run?

I'm looking at an example in a book about abstract classes and when they extend it with a non-abstract subclass, the subclass's default constructor is blank and there's a comment that says the superclass's default constructor will be called. At the same time I've also seen instances on here where someone's problem was not explicitly calling super().

Is the distinction from calling the superclass's default/non-default constructor from the subclass's default/non-default constructor?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 73 down vote accepted

You never need just

super();

That's what will be there if you don't specify anything else. You only need to specify the constructor to call if:

  • You want to call a superclass constructor which has parameters
  • You want to chain to another constructor in the same class instead of the superclass constructor

You claim that:

At the same time I've also seen instances on here where someone's problem was not explicitly calling super().

Could you give any examples? I can't imagine how that's possible...

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Yea I should've been more clear. It was super(with arguments). Thanks for your answer. –  jhlu87 Jun 11 '11 at 21:35

The super() method is always called in constructors of subclasses, even if it is not explicitly written in code.

The only time you need to write it, is if there are several super(...) methods in the superclass with different initialization parameters.

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"The only time you need to write it, is if there are several super(...) methods in the superclass with different initialization parameters." Not true. As long as there's a reachable argument less constructor, you can have a hundred other constructors without any problems. –  Voo Jun 11 '11 at 21:28

If you don't explicitly call a super constructor the argument less constructor (super()) will be called. This means you have to call a specific constructor yourself if there's no reachable argument-less constructor of the super class.

But often enough you want a different constructor anyways even if you could use the default constructor - depends on your code.

Also note that if no constructor is declared the compiler generates a public default constructor automatically, but as soon as you write your own constructor this does not happen anymore.

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Just to make sure I understand. If in my superclass, I have one constructor and it's not the default constructor(say it takes a parameter). Then in my constructor for my subclass I need to explicitly call super(param) because the compiler will no longer generate a default constructor for the super class? –  jhlu87 Jun 11 '11 at 21:38
    
@jhlu87, correct –  bestsss Jun 11 '11 at 21:46
    
@bestsss, got it thanks. –  jhlu87 Jun 11 '11 at 21:47

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