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I am trying to make a fully thread-safe initialization function for my library and I couldn't easily find an alternative to pthread_once, which should solve the problem very easily. I've come to this code:


void libInit (void)
{
#ifdef WIN32
    static volatile int initialized = 0;
    static HANDLE mtx;

    if (!initialized)
    {
    	if (!mtx)
    	{
    		HANDLE mymtx;
    		mymtx = CreateMutex(NULL, 0, NULL);
    		if (InterlockedCompareExchangePointer(&mtx, mymtx, NULL) != NULL)
    			CloseHandle(mymtx);
    	}

    	WaitForSingleObject(mtx);
    	if (!initialized)
    	{
    		libInitInternal();
    		initialized = 1;
    	}
    	ReleaseMutex(mtx);
    }
#else
    static pthread_once_t initialized = PTHREAD_ONCE_INIT;

    pthread_once(&initialized, libInitInternal);
#endif
}

The libInitInternal() call leads to a thread-unsafe function, that initializes the library.

I would like to hear any suggestions on what I could be doing wrong or whether you know about a better solution.

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IS this a static library or a dll? –  grieve Mar 10 '09 at 21:52
    
It is not a DLL. I know that there's an initialization function for DLL's but that's not what I want. –  Přemysl J. Mar 11 '09 at 12:31
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5 Answers

I think you want to use the One-Time Initialization functionality. In synchronous mode, all threads block until the first thread to call it completes. Seems analogous to pthread_once().

There is sample code here.

So in your case, you would say:

BOOL CALLBACK CallLibInitInternal(PINIT_ONCE InitOnce, PVOID Parameter, PVOID *lpContex) {
    libInitInternal();
    return TRUE;
}

void libInit() {
#ifdef WIN32
    static INIT_ONCE s_init_once;
    InitOnceExecuteOnce(&s_init_once, CallLibInitInternal, NULL, NULL);
#else
...
#endif
}
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1  
This can be used only on Windows Vista and newer. I'd love to have something that will work on Windows 98. –  Přemysl J. Mar 11 '09 at 14:34
    
Really? I totally missed that in the docs. Sorry. You'll need to write the code and your OP looks close. Probably want to create a named object that everyone waits on so they're all waiting on the same object. –  jeffamaphone Mar 11 '09 at 18:35
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You might want to check what pthreads-win32 does in its pthread_once() implementaion. or just use that, if that proves to be easier.

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After looking at the following source code for pthread_once() (from here), It looks like you're on the right track.

int pthread_once(pthread_once_t *once_control, void (*init_routine)(void))
{
    /* Check first for speed */
    if (once_control->state == PTHREAD_NEEDS_INIT) {
    	pthread_mutex_lock(&(once_control->mutex));
    	if (once_control->state == PTHREAD_NEEDS_INIT) {
    		init_routine();
    		once_control->state = PTHREAD_DONE_INIT;
    	}
    	pthread_mutex_unlock(&(once_control->mutex));
    }
    return(OK);
}

btw, I'll be using pthread_once() to replace some rather convoluted functions in my code.

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2  
Isn't it the Double Checked Locking antipattern? It is supposed to NOT work portably. I would not use it without intensive testing on my platform/outside the platform for which it was written... See the following article by S. Meyers and A. Alexandrescu: aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ_Jul_Aug_2004_revised.pdf –  paercebal Oct 11 '10 at 11:33
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When using GCC or clang, you can use constructor and destructor attributes. These work for both shared and static libraries, and execute code before and after main is run, respectively. Additionally, you can specify multiple constructor and destructor functions. Much cleaner than the singleton approach, and doesn't require you to remember to call libInit() from your main().

static void __attribute__((constructor))
your_lib_init(void)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "library init\n");
}

static void __attribute__((destructor))
vensim_ctx_destroy(void)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "library destroy\n");
}
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This is nonstandard, so I guess it would have to be backed up by the regular "singleton approach" for other compilers anyway. It really looks good, though. If I could, I'd +1. –  Přemysl J. Jun 11 '11 at 5:53
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I would check out this article. It is a solution for C++ singletons, but I believe you can use the solution for your code as well: http://www.ddj.com/cpp/199203083?pgno=1

Sadly the listing for the QLock itself is missing, it looks as if they are trying to sell the CD, but there appears to be enough description of it to write one yourself.

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