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I am creating a form, with warning elements. All works great but need to define my patterns better.

                $("#postcode").inputNotes( 
              {
                warning: {
                  pattern: /^[0-9]+$/,
                  type: 'note',
                  text: 'Only numbers, please ...',
                  inversedBehavior: true
                }
              }
            );
            $("#phone").inputNotes( 
              {
                warning: {
                  pattern: /^[0-9]+$/,
                  type: 'note',
                  text: 'Only numbers, no spaces please ...',
                  inversedBehavior: true
                }
              }
            );

Ok for the Postcode warning, I want the pattern to expect 4 numbers

For the Phone warning, I want the pattern to expect 10 numbers.

Any help appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update:

For 6 digit or 10 digit numbers: pattern: /^[0-9]{10}|[0-9]{6}$/,

For four digit Postcode: pattern: /^[0-9]{4}$/,

For 10 digit Phone number: (if phone number can't start with 0) pattern: /^[1-9][0-9]{9}$/,

(if phone number can start with 0) pattern: /^[0-9]{10}$/,

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Why can't the phone number start with a 0? –  alex Jun 12 '11 at 2:53
    
Thanks so much, sorted Brilliant –  422 Jun 12 '11 at 2:54
    
@alex: Have not seen any 10 digit phone number starting with a 0. Updated the post with a note just in case the numbers do exist. –  Chandu Jun 12 '11 at 2:55
    
Mobile numbers start with 0 and we require user to type in their state prefix ( australia ) which starts 01 , 02 etc –  422 Jun 12 '11 at 2:58
    
@Cybernate Where I and @422 are from (Australia), mobile numbers start with a 0 (unless using their country code prefix, e.g. +61). –  alex Jun 12 '11 at 3:01
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Instead of using the + modifier, try using {num}, where num is the number of instances of the previous atom you want.

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Cheers have added that to my side notes as a pointer appreciate answer :) –  422 Jun 12 '11 at 2:54
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For a 4 digit postcode, you can use /^\d{4}$/.

For a 10 digit postcode, you can use /^\d{10}$/.

Keep in mind some people will type spaces, parenthesis etc into the phone number. You should strip all non digits first before validating with /[^\d]+/g.

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Thnaks, so what is the difference between your regex and @cybernate ? now I am really confused –  422 Jun 12 '11 at 2:57
    
@422 Not a great deal really, I just used the \d shorthand for the [0-9] character class and mine allows a leading 0. –  alex Jun 12 '11 at 3:02
    
Gottya, will use that on other regex, great point. first time I have played with this... –  422 Jun 12 '11 at 3:05
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Here are the rules for Australian postcodes:

ACT: 0200-0299 and 2600-2639.

NSW: 1000-1999, 2000-2599 and 2640-2914.

NT: 0900-0999 and 0800-0899.

QLD: 9000-9999 and 4000-4999.

SA: 5000-5999.

TAS: 7800-7999 and 7000-7499.

VIC: 8000-8999 and 3000-3999.

WA: 6800-6999 and 6000-6799

Regular Expression: ^(0[289][0-9]{2})|([1345689][0-9]{3})|(2[0-8][0-9]{2})|(290[0-9])|(291[0-4])|(7[0-4][0-9]{2})|(7[8-9][0-9]{2})$

Pass: 0200|||7312|||2415

Fail: 0300|||7612|||2915

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