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I have the following superclass:

unit DlgDefaultForm;

type
  TDefaultFormDlg = class(TForm)
  published
    constructor Create(AOwner: TComponent); reintroduce; virtual; 
  end;

  FormCreateFunc=function(AOwner: TComponent):TDefaultFormDlg;

which is descended by a bunch of forms as follows:

unit Form1

type
  TForm1 = class(TDefaultFormDlg)
  published
    constructor Create(AOwner: TComponent); override;
  end;

and created as follows:

unit MainForm;

procedure ShowForm(FormCreate:FormCreateFunc);
begin
  (do some stuff)
  FormCreate(ScrollBox1);
end;

When I run

ShowForm(@TForm1.Create);

two things happen:

  1. When I step into TForm1.Create, AOwner=nil, even when it didn't in ShowForm.

  2. I get an EAbstractError at the following line:

    unit Forms;
    (...)
    constructor TCustomForm.Create(AOwner: TComponent);
    begin
      (...)
      InitializeNewForm; //EAbstractError
      (...)
    end;
    

What am I doing wrong?

EDIT: This of course isn't my exact code.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're not using virtual constructors correctly. Try it like this:

type
  TDefaultFormDlgClass = class of TDefaultFormDlg;

function Show(FormClass: TDefaultFormDlgClass; AOwner: TComponent): TDefaultFormDlg;
begin
  Result := FormClass.Create(AOwner);
end;

...
var
  FormClass: TTDefaultFormDlgClass;
...
FormClass := ???;//this is where you specify the class at runtime, e.g. TForm1
MyForm := Show(FormClass, MainForm);

As an aside I do not think you need to reintroduce the constructor in the code you listed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I was wondering if I could hold the class type in a variable. I'll try this out. –  boileau Jun 12 '11 at 11:28
    
Looking good. I'm still getting some errors on closing the form, but I don't thing that's related. –  boileau Jun 12 '11 at 11:35

Delphi constructors take a hidden extra parameter which indicates two things: whether NewInstance needs to be called, and what the type of the implicit first parameter (Self) is. When you call a constructor from a class or class reference, you actually want to construct a new object, and the type of the Self parameter will be the actual class type. When you call a constructor from another constructor, or when you're calling the inherited constructor, then the object instance has already been created and is passed as the Self parameter. The hidden extra parameter acts as a Boolean flag which is True for allocating a new instance but False for method-style calls of the constructor.

Because of this, you can't simply store a constructor in a method pointer[1] location and expect it to work; calling the method pointer won't pass the correct value for the hidden extra parameter, and it will break. You can get around it by declaring the parameter explicitly, and doing some typecasting. But usually it is more desirable and less error-prone to use metaclasses (class references) directly.

[1] That's another problem with your code. You're trying to store a method pointer in a function pointer location. You could do that and still make it work, but you'd need to put the declaration of Self in explicitly then, and you'd also need to pass the metaclass as the first parameter when allocating (as well as passing True for the implicit flag). Method pointers bake in the first parameter and pass it automatically. To make it all explicit, the function pointer equivalent to TComponent.Create is something like:

TComponentCreate = function(Self: Pointer; AOwner: TComponent; DoAlloc: Boolean): Pointer;

Self is a pointer here because it could be of TComponentClass type, or TComponent type, depending on whether DoAlloc is true or false.

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Thanks for the info! –  boileau Jun 12 '11 at 11:48

Based on the information from Barry I tested this code. TSample is a simple class with a paramless constructor. All you need is the pointer to the constructor (@TSample.Create) and the type of the class (TSample). If you've a hashmap key=TClass, value=Pointer ctor you can create any registered type.

type
  TObjectCreate = function(Self: TClass; DoAlloc: Boolean): TObject;

var
  aSample : TSample;
begin
  aSample := TSample(TObjectCreate(@TSample.Create)(TSample, true));
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