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Is it possible to use some "Previous-Next" Buttons instead of a slider as in the example Below when the controlled value is discrete ?

I found the Manipulator one quite ugly and would like some Setter type ones if it is possible.

Manipulate[
           Graphics[
                    {
                     Rectangle[{1, 1}, {3, 3}],
                      Circle[{where, 2}, 1]
                    }, 
                     PlotRange -> {{0, 11}, {0, 3}}, ImageSize -> {300, 60}
                    ],
           {where, 1, 10, 1, Slider}
          ]

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can create your own controls using Button like so:

Manipulate[
 Graphics[
  {Rectangle[{1, 1}, {3, 3}],
   Circle[{where, 2}, 1]},
  PlotRange -> {{0, 11}, {0, 3}},
  ImageSize -> {300, 60}
  ],
 {{where, 1, ""}, 
  Button["Prev", where = Max[1, where - 1], Appearance -> "Palette", 
    ImageSize -> {50, Automatic}] &},
 {{where, 1, ""}, 
  Button["Next", where = Min[10, where + 1], Appearance -> "Palette",
    ImageSize -> {50, Automatic}] &},
 ControlPlacement -> Left]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
@Yoda, Thank You ! –  500 Jun 12 '11 at 16:40
    
@500, you should accept this answer if it solves your problem. –  Joshua Martell Jun 12 '11 at 20:31
3  
@Joshua, I allow myself to let it unanswered to let other experts have the time to propose their solution. From question I have posted and others, I have observed that answers are not redundant but rather fitting different constraints. So when I feel the question raise interest I leave it a open. I give myself a day or two. Yoda answer is the one I use , and it will be the one checked. "Only in grammar can you be more than perfect." (William Safire) This best sum my thought and the respectful idea I make myself of this forum. However, with this respect I am happy to adapt my conduct. –  500 Jun 12 '11 at 22:26
    
@Joshua I find the reverse (i.e., accepting the first answer that seems to do the trick seconds after posting) more annoying. If that would be the default behavior we'd have to circle around like vultures all the time, and I've got more to do than that. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 12 '11 at 23:21
    
@Joshua: A lot of people don't bother answering if there's already an accepted answer, and if one is hasty, one might miss out on experienced folks providing better answers or answers that complement the existing ones. For e.g., in this very question, Sjoerd's answer nicely complements mine and explains how to disable buttons at the end points. This was something I did not know how to do, and it's helpful not only to the OP but to me and perhaps to others as well. –  r.m. Jun 12 '11 at 23:30

As far as I know, if a control isn't specified for Manipulate then Mathematica will decide what control to use based on values given. This is usually the Manipulator control which is distinct from the Slider control (in your example) in that one can expand the control to use step forward / back, play features etc. These may be enough:

Manipulate[
 Graphics[{Rectangle[{1, 1}, {3, 3}], Circle[{where, 2}, 1]}, 
  PlotRange -> {{0, 11}, {0, 3}}, ImageSize -> {300, 60}], {where, 1, 
  10, 1, Manipulator, Appearance -> "Open", 
  AppearanceElements -> {"StepLeftButton", "StepRightButton"}}]

A fairly recent question here on SO addressed how to show these discrete buttons for a Manipulator from the start by using the option: Appearance-> Open How to show the animation control by default.

Edit: You can also specify which discrete buttons you want to appear, e.g. just the step left and right buttons using

AppearanceElements -> {"StepLeftButton", "StepRightButton"}

which I added to the code sample above.

Actually a better and simpler option would be to use the trigger control which will hide the slider bar.

Manipulate[
 Graphics[{Rectangle[{1, 1}, {3, 3}], Circle[{where, 2}, 1]}, 
  PlotRange -> {{0, 11}, {0, 3}}, ImageSize -> {300, 60}], {where, 1, 
  10, 1, ControlType -> Trigger, 
  AppearanceElements -> {"StepLeftButton", "StepRightButton"}}]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You. My problem is that I just found those ugly compared to other forms of Control. –  500 Jun 12 '11 at 15:53

As Yoda showed, Button can be used to for Next and Previous buttons in a Manipulate. Buttons of this kind are often use to go through a limited range of objects. At the beginning and end of this range the Previous and the Next button should be disabled, respectively. To get this to work, the button property Enabled can be used and, since its action depends on an interactively changing value, Dynamic is required. The following toy example shows how this works.

Example code:

votePictures[picturesInput_] :=
 DynamicModule[{pictures = picturesInput, status, i},
  status = Table["Not Voted", {Length[pictures]}];
  i = 1;
  Panel[
   Row[
    {
     Dynamic[Show[pictures[[i]], ImageSize -> 256]], Spacer[72 0.7],
     Column[
       {
        Row[{Style["Status  ", FontFamily -> "Arial-Bold"], 
          SetterBar[
           Dynamic[status[[i]]], {"No response", "Ugly", "Nice"}]}
        ], , ,
        Row[{
           Button["Previous", i -= 1, Enabled -> (i > 1)], 
           Button["Next", i += 1, Enabled -> (i < Length[pictures])]}
        ] // Dynamic,
        Row[
            {
             Style["Picture   ", FontFamily -> "Arial-Bold"], 
             Slider[Dynamic[i], {1, Length[pictures], 1},Appearance -> "Labeled"]
            }
        ], , ,
        Button["Save results", (*Export code here *)]
        }
       ] // Framed
     }
    ], ImageSize -> 750
   ]
  ]

pictures = ExampleData[#] & /@ ExampleData["TestImage"]

votePictures[pictures]

enter image description here

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2  
@yoda Your method of stopping at the ends of the range is perhaps simpler, but from a human factors viewpoint incorrect. Buttons that are ineffective at a given time should be shown as greyed out (depending on the OS metaphore) in order not to confuse the user. This is a very common design pattern. Take for instance the Save button in my example. If the user shouldn't be able to save before all picture have been judged the button should not appear to be active. Just a bit of expectation management. Here, I chose to have this button active all the time, signalling that you can save at any time. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 12 '11 at 22:41
    
For those confused: there was a comment above made by Yoda just 10 minutes ago that disappeared while a wrote the above response. I just leave the response here, just in case it's a technical issue. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 12 '11 at 22:49
    
@Sjoerd: You're definitely correct and I was only agreeing with you. I deleted because what I wrote didn't come out right, and it was too late to edit my comment :) –  r.m. Jun 12 '11 at 23:13
    
@Sjoerd, I have had the time to go through your code, I hope to have this ease with dynamic soon. I believe you should add this to your demonstration on wolfram. It truly is one. –  500 Jun 14 '11 at 3:11
    
@500 Thanks. wrt demonstration: I believe that I have only contributed ideas to one, but I haven't submitted one of my own. Which one were you referring to? –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 14 '11 at 11:09

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