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I have found a bug in IE9 but googling for it hasn't helped finding any solution yet.

The following works fine in FF 3 + 4, Chrome, Opera and even IE8, but not in IE9.

The HTML:

<div class="outer">
    <p class="inner">Lorem ipsum dolor</p>
</div>

The CSS:

div p {
    font-size: 1.2em;
}
div p:after {
    content: " sit amet";
}

div p:after {
    font-size: 1.3em;
}
div.outer p:after,
div p.inner:after {
    font-size: 3em;
}

The "sit amet" is huge in IE9, as it seems to multiply the font-size again and again. It's not possible to overwrite it with "!important" or other means of increasing the specificity (as e.g. the "div.outer" should already do it). It even seems that it gets multiplied within the same declaration, i.e. div.outer p:after, div p.inner:after won't multiply by 3, but by 9!

(Please note that the "inner" and "outer" classes are not necessary here. The same happens by declaring div p {} again and again. But it makes only sense with classes as a real-world example.)

Here is a test page: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/4667354/temp/ie9-bug.html

Is there any solution?

Edit:

To clarify two misunderstandings:

  1. The bug is not the usual behaviour that child elements multiply the font-size of its parent when em are used. The bug is that font-sizes in generated content cannot be overwritten and will multiply anyway when trying to. I.e. setting the font-size in div p:after once works, but setting it again multiplies instead of overwrites it.
  2. To better see what the problem is (in case you don't have IE9 at hand), here are two screenshots of the test page: in IE8 and any other modern browser and in IE9.
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could try using rem instead of em, IE9 supports it, then your sizes will then be relative to the base font size instead of multiplying together. Here's a good explanation.

I would guess the difference here is that IE9 is treating the generated content as a child element while the other browsers aren't, hence the multiplication.

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1  
Wow, I haven't heard of rem yet. This definitely fixes it! :) If IE9 really treats the generated content as a child element, does it mean that its DOM is (at least partly) broken (again)? –  selfthinker Jun 12 '11 at 16:24
    
@selfthinker It might be - I've not checked up exactly how it's supposed to work, if you asked on www-style you would get a definitive answer. –  robertc Jun 12 '11 at 16:29
    
Just for the record: This doesn't fix the real issue, but is a good enough workaround. If the parent font-size should be adjustable, so that every child should automatically grow to the same proportion, this solution does not work. I.e. whenever the parent font-size is increased or decreased, the child with a rem value keeps its (wrong) font-size. –  selfthinker Jun 13 '11 at 0:38
    
Actually, in IE generated content inherits font-size from itself, not the parent element. This causes recursive font-size calculations, with results spinning out of control. It's amazing that Microsoft has left this unfixed for three whole releases (9-11) –  Már Örlygsson Aug 25 at 13:27

This might have something to do with the difference between the parsed DOM trees from IE8 to IE9.

Internet Explorer 8:

  • <html>
    • <head>
    • <body>
      • <div class="outer">
        • <p class="inner">
          • Text - Lorem ipsum dolar

Internet Explorer 9:

  • <html>
    • <head>
    • <body>
      • Text - Empty Text Node
      • <div class="outer">
        • Text - Empty Text Node
        • <p class="inner">
          • Text - Lorem ipsum dolar
        • Text - Empty Text Node
      • Text - Empty Text Node

Bonus Reading

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, good point. But that would mean that removing the whitespace would fix it, which it doesn't. When I remove the whitespace, it looks like the IE8 example (i.e. without the "Text - Empty Text Node" in between) and the bug is still present. –  selfthinker Jul 22 '12 at 8:40
    
this typoe of anwsers are the best –  user1721135 Jan 23 '13 at 22:22

This is the default relative handling as the em unit is supposed to do. em is a size/length unit relative to the parent. For example px to the contrary, is an absolute size unit which doesn't take the unit of the parent into account.

Edit:

Aaah, I now understand the problem. Well, of course it has something to do with the double declaration:

div.outer p:after, div p.inner:after 

But as to which browser renders it correctly, I would not dare taking a guess.

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No, this is not the default handling for the same element (I am only talking about the css content of the paragraph here). One proof is that it works in all the other browsers. –  selfthinker Jun 12 '11 at 16:13

I see the test page "sit amet" as huge in Firefox 4.0.1. Are you sure this is IE only and not actual spec'd behavior?

edit: and safari too. I'm on a Mac. I don't think this is an IE bug.

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1  
No, the "sit amet" is supposed to be big everywhere (i.e. 3em), but in IE9 it is much, much bigger (i.e. 11.7em!). Please take a look in IE9 as well and you'll see what I mean. –  selfthinker Jun 13 '11 at 8:38
    
I just added two screenshots to the question to clarify this. –  selfthinker Jun 13 '11 at 9:01

I've seen similar in other versions of IE using ems too. Try setting

HTML {
    font-size: 100%;
}

Should fix it!

share|improve this answer
    
No, the point is that font-sizes in generated content cannot be overwritten. That's the bug. If you cannot overwrite it, a font-size: 100% can't help as well. –  selfthinker Jun 13 '11 at 8:42

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