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When I want a specific menu link to be active at a given page, I'm using this approach in Razor:

On the master layout I have these checks:

var active = ViewBag.Active;
const string ACTIVE_CLASS = "current";

if (active == "home")
{
    ViewBag.ActiveHome = ACTIVE_CLASS;
}
if (active == "products")
{
    ViewBag.ActiveProducts = ACTIVE_CLASS;
}

etc.

The html menu on the master layout:

<ul>
<li class="@ViewBag.ActiveHome"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
<li class="@ViewBag.ActiveProducts"><a href="@Url.Action("index", "products")">Products</a></li>
</ul>

When specifying which layout page to use on a different view:

@{
    ViewBag.Active = "home";
    Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml";
}

Is there a better approach to sepcify active links, than the one I'm currently using?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 118 down vote accepted

A better approach is to use a HTML helper:

using System.Web.Mvc; 
using System.Web.Mvc.Html;

public static class MenuExtensions
{
    public static MvcHtmlString MenuItem(
        this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, 
        string text,
        string action, 
        string controller
    )
    {
        var li = new TagBuilder("li");
        var routeData = htmlHelper.ViewContext.RouteData;
        var currentAction = routeData.GetRequiredString("action");
        var currentController = routeData.GetRequiredString("controller");
        if (string.Equals(currentAction, action, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) &&
            string.Equals(currentController, controller, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            li.AddCssClass("active");
        }
        li.InnerHtml = htmlHelper.ActionLink(text, action, controller).ToHtmlString();
        return MvcHtmlString.Create(li.ToString());
    }
}

and then:

<ul>
    @Html.MenuItem("Home", "Home", "Home")
    @Html.MenuItem("Products", "Index", "Products")
</ul>

To make the above work you need your views to recognize your extension: In Web.config in the Views folder, add <add namespace="yourNamespacehere.Helpers" /> inside the namespaces tag. Then build your project and close and re-open the view you are adding this to.

then based on the current action and controller the helper will add or not the active class when generating the anchor.

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Looks like those mvc html helpers is a great idea, I might look more into that. Thanks, works like a charm. –  Jens Jun 12 '11 at 16:34
    
Nice! I wanted to do this but couldn't figure out how to work out the active controller and action from inside an html helper. –  Richard Garside Jun 28 '11 at 20:58
1  
Needed the same -- exactly -- and this did the trick. We must both be using Bootstrap. Thanks! –  davidbitton Aug 6 '12 at 13:30
1  
@Fergal, make sure you have brought the namespace in which the extension method is defined into scope in the view. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 3 '13 at 14:48
20  
Thank you, just to clarify for fellow newbies to C# and MVC 3, here is what I had to do: create Helpers folder on root, create a class, MenuExtensions.cs, with the above code in this folder. To the top of the file add using System.Web.Mvc; using System.Web.Mvc.Html; In Web.config in the Views folder, add <add namespace="yourNamespacehere.Helpers" /> inside the namespaces tag. –  Fergal Feb 3 '13 at 16:18

Expanding on Darin's example, here's the full class which adds additional optional parameters for RouteValues and HtmlAttributes on the helper. In effect, it behaves just like the base ActionLink.

using System;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System.Web.Mvc.Html;

namespace MYNAMESPACE.Helpers {
    public static class MenuExtensions {
        public static MvcHtmlString MenuItem(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper,
                                             string text, string action,
                                             string controller,
                                             object routeValues = null,
                                             object htmlAttributes = null) {
            var li = new TagBuilder("li");
            var routeData = htmlHelper.ViewContext.RouteData;
            var currentAction = routeData.GetRequiredString("action");
            var currentController = routeData.GetRequiredString("controller");
            if (string.Equals(currentAction,
                              action,
                              StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) &&
                string.Equals(currentController,
                              controller,
                              StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
                li.AddCssClass("active");
            }
            if (routeValues != null) {
                li.InnerHtml = (htmlAttributes != null)
                    ? htmlHelper.ActionLink(text,
                                            action,
                                            controller,
                                            routeValues,
                                            htmlAttributes).ToHtmlString()
                    : htmlHelper.ActionLink(text, 
                                            action, 
                                            controller, 
                                            routeValues).ToHtmlString();
            }
            else {
                li.InnerHtml = htmlHelper.ActionLink(text, 
                                                     action, 
                                                     controller).ToHtmlString();
            }
            return MvcHtmlString.Create(li.ToString());
        }
    }
}

And in the View folder's web.config:

<system.web.webPages.razor>
  <host ... />
  <pages ... >
    <namespaces>
      ...

      ...
      <add namespace="MYNAMESPACE.Helpers" />
    </namespaces>
  </pages>
</system.web.webPages.razor>
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Use this InnerHtml if you'd like to include HTML formatting in your text;

li.InnerHtml = "<a href=\"" + new UrlHelper(htmlHelper.ViewContext.RequestContext).Action(action, controller).ToString() + "\">" + text + "</a>";

text could be "<b>Bold</b>Normal";

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This code worked great for me, even on a new Visual Studio 2013 MVC5/Bootstrap project. Note also that you could change the li.AddCssClass("active"); line to point to a custom class if you want to leave the Bootstrap "active" class alone. I added one called "activemenu" in the project's Site.css file and did any specific navbar styling changes I wanted there.

The line in the code above was just changed to this to get it all working:

li.AddCssClass("activemenu");

In Site.css I added a simple class for my purpose:

.activemenu {
    text-decoration: underline;
}

Alternatively you could change the background color and/or border, etc...

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