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I'm implementing some algorithms which works on large data (~250 MB - 1 GB). For this I needed a loop to do some benchmarking. However, in the process I learn that F# is doing some nasty things, which I hope some of you can clarify.

Here is my code (description of the problem is below):

open System

for i = 1 to 10 do
    Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
    printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true)) 

Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore
// should force a garbage collection, and GC.Collect() doesn't help either
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))

Console.ReadLine() |> ignore

Here the output will be like:

54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
54000
400000000
800000000
1200000000

Out of memory exception

So, in the loop F# discards the result, but when I'm not in the loop F# will keep references to "dead data" (I've looked in the IL, and apparently the class Program gets fields for this data). Why? And can I fix that?

This code is runned outside Visual Studio and in release mode.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The reason for this behavior is that the F# compiler behaves differently in the global scope than in local scope. A variable declared at global scope is turned into a static field. A module declaration is a static class with let declarations compiled as fields/properties/methods.

The simplest way to fix the problem is to write your code in a function:

let main () =    
  Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
  printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
  Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 |> ignore    
  printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
  // (...)
  Console.ReadLine() |> ignore

main ()

... but why does the compiler declare fields when you're not using the value and just ignore it? This is quite interesting - the ignore function is a very simple function that is inlined when you use it. The declaration is let inline ignore _ = (). When inlining the function, the compiler declares some variables (to store the arguments of the function).

So, another way to fix this is to omit ignore and write:

Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
Array2D.zeroCreate 10000 10000 
printfn "%d" (GC.GetTotalMemory(true))
// (...)

You'll get some compiler warnings, because the result of expression is not unit, but it will work. However, using some function and writing code in local scope is probably more reliable.

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+1 Thanks, interesting :) The first solution works, but ignoring ignore didn't help here. I'm still interested in finding out why it does what it does, though. –  Lasse Espeholt Jun 12 '11 at 17:30
1  
Interesting... It helped when i tried that with the -O option (to enable optimizations). –  Tomas Petricek Jun 12 '11 at 18:30
    
Weird. It worked here too when I ran it outside of Visual Studio. However, now the loop resulted in out-of-memory exception, but ONLY if I had ran the "non-loop" version first :/ I guess I'll just stick to local scope. –  Lasse Espeholt Jun 13 '11 at 8:30

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