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I defined the following function, where List is a structure.

List * LIST_Create()
{
  List * l = calloc(0, sizeof(List));
  unsigned char * pc = (unsigned char *)l;  
  for(i = 0; i < sizeof(List); i++)
  {
    LOG("LIST","0x%1x ", (unsigned char)*pc);
    pc++;
  }
}

When I print out the bytes I get this:

LIST: 0xffffffbf 
LIST: 0x1 
LIST: 0x13 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x1 
LIST: 0x1 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x0 
LIST: 0x5 

what's going on? I know it isn't the printing that's the issue, because the code is reading non-zero values too. The only way I can reliably zero out the List structure seems to be to initialise all the members individually. I don't mind, but shouldn't calloc() work?

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3  
Yet another reason why the "malloc(0) should return a unique nonzero pointer" crowd is on crack... If calloc had returned NULL the program would have crashed right away and the bug would have been apparent... –  R.. Jun 12 '11 at 17:39
    
@R. Interesting. –  BeeBand Jun 12 '11 at 18:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You allocated space enough for 0 Lists:

List * l = calloc(0, sizeof(List));

Therefore your allocated memory is 0 bytes long.

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calloc(0, sizeof(List)) allocates a 0-length buffer; you're printing random data after a "dummy" pointer created so you can realloc() it later. The parameters to calloc are the number of items and the size of a single item; this makes it easier to allocate, say, a vector of 5 (struct foo)s.

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The manual says:

   calloc()  allocates memory for an array of nmemb elements of size bytes
   each and returns a pointer to the allocated memory.  The memory is  set
   to  zero.  If nmemb or size is 0, then calloc() returns either NULL, or
   a unique pointer value that can later be successfully passed to free().

Your function call List * l = calloc(0, sizeof(List));

Therefore you have a 0 length memory block's address or NULL in l. (Probably you have mixed up with memset ?)

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yep. Indeed I sort of got it mixed up with memset(). –  BeeBand Jun 12 '11 at 18:11

You're requesting an allocation of zero bytes. The size allocated by calloc is nmemb*size, and you have nmemb == 0.

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You're calling calloc with 0 elements (no elements). You at least have to pass 1:

List* l = calloc(1,sizeof(List));
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