Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the program:

import Language.Haskell.Exts.Annotated -- from haskell-src-exts
import System.Mem
import System.IO
import Control.Exception

main :: IO ()
main = do
  evaluate $ length $ show $ fromParseResult $ parseFileContents $ "data C = C {a :: F {- " ++ replicate 400000 'd' ++ " -}     }"
  performGC
  performGC
  performGC

Using GHC 7.0.3, when I run:

$ ghc --make Temp.hs -rtsopts && Temp.exe +RTS -G1 -S
    Alloc    Copied     Live    GC    GC     TOT     TOT  Page Flts
    bytes     bytes     bytes  user  elap    user    elap
 ...
 29463264        64   8380480  0.00  0.00    0.64    0.85    0    0  (Gen:  0)
       20        56   8380472  0.00  0.00    0.64    0.86    0    0  (Gen:  0)
        0        56   8380472  0.00  0.00    0.64    0.87    0    0  (Gen:  0)
    42256       780     33452  0.00  0.00    0.64    0.88    0    0  (Gen:  0)
        0                      0.00  0.00

The performGC call seems to leave 8Mb of memory live, even though it seems like all the memory should be dead. How come?

(Without -G1 I see 10Mb live at the end, which I also can't explain.)

share|improve this question
9  
I realize that this is a thoroughly useless comment, but I really love seeing questions here from people who know far more about Haskell than I do, because the answers that follow tend to be utterly fascinating. :] –  C. A. McCann Jun 12 '11 at 18:23
3  
Well, it's a nice change from the steady stream of questions answerable by "don't, but unsafePerformIO", "fromIntegral" and "convert tabs to spaces"... –  yatima2975 Jun 12 '11 at 22:45
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Here's what I see (after inserting a print before the last performGC, to help tag when things happen.

   524288    524296  32381000  0.00  0.00    1.15    1.95    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   524288    524296  31856824  0.00  0.00    1.16    1.96    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   368248       808   1032992  0.00  0.02    1.16    1.99    0    0  (Gen:  1)
        0       808   1032992  0.00  0.00    1.16    1.99    0    0  (Gen:  1)
"performed!"
    39464      2200   1058952  0.00  0.00    1.16    1.99    0    0  (Gen:  1)
    22264      1560   1075992  0.00  0.00    1.16    2.00    0    0  (Gen:  0)
        0                      0.00  0.00

So after GCs there is still 1M on the heap (without -G1). With -G1 I see:

 34340656  20520040  20524800  0.10  0.12    0.76    0.85    0    0  (Gen:  0)
 41697072  24917800  24922560  0.12  0.14    0.91    1.01    0    0  (Gen:  0)
 70790776       800   2081568  0.00  0.02    1.04    1.20    0    0  (Gen:  0)
        0       800   2081568  0.00  0.00    1.04    1.20    0    0  (Gen:  0)
"performed!"
    39464      2184   1058952  0.00  0.00    1.05    1.21    0    0  (Gen:  0)
    22264      2856     43784  0.00  0.00    1.05    1.21    0    0  (Gen:  0)
        0                      0.00  0.00

So about 2M. This is on x86_64/Linux.

Let's think about the STG machine storage model to see if there's something else on the heap.

Things that could be in that 1M of space:

  • CAFs for things like [], string constants, and the small Int and Char pool, plus things in libraries, the stdin MVar?
  • Thread State Objects (TSOs) for the main thread.
  • Any allocated signal handlers.
  • The IO manager Haskell code.
  • Sparks in the spark pool

From experience, this figure of slightly less than 1M seems to be the default "footprint" of a GHC binary. That's about what I've seen in other programs as well (e.g. shootout program smallest footprints are never less than 900K).

Perhaps the profiler can say something. Here's the -hT profile (no profiling libs needed), after I insert a minimal busy loop at the end to string out the tail:

 $ ./A +RTS -K10M -S -hT -i0.001    

Results in this graph:


enter image description here


Victory! Look at that ~1M thread stack object sitting there!

I don't know of a way to make TSOs smaller.


The code that produced the above graph:

import Language.Haskell.Exts.Annotated -- from haskell-src-exts
import System.Mem
import System.IO
import Data.Int
import Control.Exception

main :: IO ()
main = do
  evaluate $ length $ show $ fromParseResult 
           $ parseFileContents 
           $ "data C = C {a :: F {- " ++ replicate 400000 'd' ++ " -}     }"
  performGC
  performGC
  print "performed!"
  performGC

  -- busy loop so we can sample what's left on the heap.
  let go :: Int32 -> IO ()
      go  0 = return ()
      go  n = go $! n-1
  go (maxBound :: Int32)
share|improve this answer
2  
P.S. same graph under hp2pretty i.imgur.com/P0F1N.png (ezyang's new tool). –  Don Stewart Jun 12 '11 at 20:09
9  
Correct, though I'm not sure why Neil was seeing 8M live. 1M is what I'd expect with 7.0.3, because the RTS releases excess stack space until it reaches 1M. Note that with 7.2.1 you'll see that figure go down to 32k, because stack is now allocated in 32k chunks. –  Simon Marlow Jun 12 '11 at 20:12
1  
(FYI: I didn't write hp2pretty :-) –  Edward Z. Yang Jun 12 '11 at 20:14
1  
I compiled the code from scratch and saw 1M this time, so the 8M may be irrelevant (but it definitely was there, so I don't really know what was going on). –  Neil Mitchell Jun 12 '11 at 20:53
add comment

Compiling the code with -O -ddump-simpl, I see the following global definition in the simplifier output:

lvl2_r12F :: [GHC.Types.Char]
[GblId]
lvl2_r12F =
  GHC.Base.unpackAppendCString# "data C = C {a :: F {- " lvl1_r12D

The input to the parser function has become a global string constant. Globals are never garbage collected in GHC, so that's probably what's occupying the 8MB of memory after garbage colleciton.

share|improve this answer
1  
CAFs are garbage collected: see the GHC commentary. –  Don Stewart Jun 12 '11 at 19:51
2  
Don's right - the CAF would be garbage collected after its last use. –  Simon Marlow Jun 12 '11 at 20:15
2  
o///o And apparently that was added to GHC over ten years ago. I stand corrected. –  Heatsink Jun 12 '11 at 20:18
1  
GC of CAFs is relatively new in ghc, so it's an easy mistake to make. :) –  augustss Jun 12 '11 at 21:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.